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GREETINGS 



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It is always a satisfaction to teachers and administra- 
tive officers of the college to welcome new students to the 
campus and to their classes. It is a further pleasure to 
greet again students with whom we have formerly been 
associated. 

The college year promises to be a most delightful and 
helpful one in every respect, and this note is to assure the 
members of the student body that every effort will be made 
to advance them in their work in the classroom and in 
every worthy activity of the campus. This is an invitation 
to the students to call upon the members of the faculty and 
the several officers of the college for any aid or informa- 
tion they may be able to give. 

C. B. HERSHEY, 

Dean and Acting President. 



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Issued eacH week during: the academic year. Entered at the'ost Office at Colorado Springs as Second-Class Matter. 



THE TIGER 



Friday, September 22, 1933 



V 



M a Iju//v good Cigarette 



J^.v.;.v;.;.V-x:\x.;:;X£.v.;. 



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of them . . . CHESTER- 
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same. They have a pleas- 
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I smoke 'em before 
breakfast and after dinner. 
I smoke 'em when I'm 
working. I smoke 'em 
when I'm resting. And al- 
ways they satisfy. They 
suit me right down to the 
ground. 



© 1933, Liggett & Myers Tobacco Co. 




t/i& cigarette t/ialb milder 
t/i& ci&areffe tAat tastes better 




Quality "Master" Cleaners Tigers Always Welcome 



Only one Quality and the 
Price is uniform 

H. A. Thompson 
Main I -8-1 -I 10 E.Kiowa 



PAYTON STUDIO 

The Place for Good Pholoprraphy 

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FOR THE SAME PRICE 

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and 

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$2.50 and up. 



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THE TIGER 



VOLUME XXXVI 



COLORADO COLLEGE WEEKLY NEWS-MAGAZINE 



Number 1 



♦ e a mp ii 



Activities 

were stressed as a means of fur- 
thering educational advantages at 
COLORADO COLLEGE Thursday 
morning in assembly as Dr. C. B. 
Hershey made his first address as 
Dean and Acting President of 
COLORADO COLLEGE. 




DR. C. B. HERSHEY 
Author, professor, scholar. 

President Hershey is the author 
of articles on universities and uni- 
versity extension in Nelson's En- 
clycopaedia and of other articles on 
education in educational religious 
periodicals. With this background 
he is well fitted for his present post. 

Dr. Hershey is a member of Phi 
Delta Kappa, honorary education 
fraternity for men; of the Rocky 
Mountain Harvard club, of which 
he was president in 1927 and 1928; 
regional correspondent of the 
Graduate School of Education, 
Harvard university; a member of 
the Colorado Schoolmasters club, 
the Colorado-Wyoming Academy of 
Science, and the Winter Night club 
of Colorado Springs. 



Delta Alpha Phi 

won permanent possession of the 
inter-fraternity council scholastic 
cup by winning highest honors for 
grade average for the third time in 
five years. Average for the embryo 
Lambda Chi Alpha chapter was 
80.504 for the year of 1932-33. 

Other averages of the frater- 
nities were Kappa Sigma. 77.489; 
Phi Gamma Delta, 77.357; Sigma 
Chi, 76.503; Phi Delta Theta, 
76.075; Pi Kappa Alpha, 75.834; 
Beta Theta Pi, 75.256. 



Precedent Cracks 

The Chemistry department of 
COLORADO COLLEGE announces 
that the largest class in organic 
chemistry ever to be enrolled in the 
college is meeting this year. Ap- 
proximately 30 students are en- 
rolled. 



Best Season Ever 

was predicted Wednesday for 
Koshare of COLORADO COLLEGE 
by John Craig, president of the or- 
ganization when interviewed by the 
representative of the TIGER. "We 
have better material, shows with 
bigger prospects, and a wealth of 
interest the like of which has never 
been manifest in dramatics before 
at this early period in the school 
year." 

Koshare will present four major 
productions in addition to the twen- 
ty-fifth anniversary presentation of 
the Christmas pageant-play, "Eager 
Heart." Announcement will be 
made later of the entire schedule 
of shows. 

Of especial interest to new 
COLORADO COLLEGE students is 
the first show of the year which is 
cast for the most part of entirely 
new students wishing to break into 
dramatics. The production this 
year is "The Damsel in Distress," a 
hilarious comedy authored by Ian 
May and P. G. Wodehouse. Try- 
outs for this show will be held 
Wednesday and Thursday, Sept. 
27-28 at 4 p. m. at Cogswell the- 
atre in Bemis Hall. 

Kosh?re is an organization made 
up of those interested in the drama 
and its many associate activities. 
Membership is open to anyone sub- 
ject to approval of work done in 
connection with dramatic produc- 
tions. One of the new undertakings 
of the organization this year will 
be a road show which will bill sev- 
eral performances during spring 
vacation. All who are interested in 
any phase of dramatics are urged 
to be present at the tryouts next 
week. 

COLORADO COLLEGE students 
are luckv in having access to the 
entire bill of five performances for 
one dollar. Season tickets may be 
had for this amount from executive 
board members of Koshare. Emma 
Loui?^ Jordan is in charge of sales 
at present. The sale of season tick- 
ets will cease after the first-night 
performance of the freshman pro- 
duction. 



Head Tactician 

is the official title voted Frances- 
ca Hall by the Associated Women 
Students as this organization m?de 
plans this week for the welcoming 
of new women students to COLO- 
RADO COLLEGE. Tactician Hall 
will have student assistants aiding 
her in the business of making new 
additions to the student body feel 
at home. 



Delta Alpha Phi Granted 
National Charter 

Delta Alpha Phi, the only local 
fraternity on the COLORADO 
COLLEGE campus has been grant- 
ed a charter of Lambda Chi Al- 
pha, national social fraternity. 

Delta Alpha Phi's petition for a 
charter, which was granted at the 
national convention of Lambda Chi 
in Chicago during August was the 
first petition ever granted by a 
unanimous vote. 

Lambda Chi Alpha was founded 
at Boston university Nov. 2, 1909, 
being an outgrowth of the Cosmo- 
politan Law club. National head- 
quarters are 701 Circle Tower, In- 
dianapolis, Ind. 

The fraternity badge is a pearl- 
set crescent with the horns turned 
toward the left, enclosing a mono- 
gram of the Greek letters, "Lamb- 
da Chi Alpha." The center of the 
crescent bears the secret Greek let- 
ters, "Delta Pi," in gold on black 
enamel. Colors of the fraternity 
are purple, green and gold: the 
flower, the violet. The pledge but- 
ton is an intricate design of the 
Greek letters, "Lambda Chi Alpha," 
in black and gold. 

Delta Alpha Phi, whose house is 
at 1015 North Nevada avenue, was 
organized here as a local fraternity 
in the fall of 1924, being given rec- 
ognition by the inter-fraternity 
council at Colorado college on No- 
vember 1 7, the day the public an- 
nouncement of its founding was 
made. There were 18 charter mem- 
bers. 

Since its inception at COLO- 
RADO COLLEGE it has striven for 
excellence in scholarship. In the 18 
semesters since its organization the 
fraternity has ranked first in schol- 
arship eleven times; second, five 
times; third, once; and fourth, 
once. 

Formal installation ceremonies 
will be held in Shove Memorial 
chapel, probably on December 9. 
National officers of Lambda Chi and 
undergraduate members of other 
Colorado chapters will come here to 
witness the installation. 

Faculty members of Delta Alpha 
Phi are Pres. C. B. Hershey and 
Prof. F. M. Okey. The Officers are 
Wallace Peck of Grand Junction, 
president; Miller H. Stroup of Colo- 
rado Springs, vice president ; Roger 
Arnold of Colorado Springs, secre- 
tary; J. Sherburne Ayers, Littleton, 
treasurer. • 

The chapter at Colorado college 



Au Revoir 

In a surprise announcement dur- 
ing the initial chapel hour of t h e 
school year, President Mierow bade 
farewell to COLORADO COLLEGE 
students and his many friends in 
Colorado Springs and early Wednes- 
day left overland for New York 
City from whence he will proceed to 
Rome for a year's study in the 
classic arts. 




CHARLES C. MIEROW 
"Goodbye, Good Luck - - " 

Dr. Mierow will spend the ensu- 
ing year in study, traveling thru 
most of Europe before his return 
to Colorado Springs late in August. 

In closing his farewell address 
Dr. Mierow said, "My happiness at 
the prospect of the fulfillment of a 
long cherished ambition — the op- 
portunity of study in my own field 
at Rome — is, not unnaturally 
tinged with regret at my separation 
from my friends here in the College 
and in Colorado Springs. I wish 
you all success and happiness in 
your work during the coming year 
and look forward with keen antici- 
pation to a resumption of my du- 
ties upon my return." 



Lost Ring 

A ring was lost the past week in 
Shove Memorial chapel which can 
be of little value to the finder. It 
was an old fashioned tiffnay setting 
in white gold with three fire opals 
and four small diamonds. It's in- 
trinsic value is small but it has great 
sentimental value because of fam- 
ily connections. A reward is offered 
to the person finding it or for in- 
formation leading to its return. 
Drop information in Tiger box in 
Coburn Library building. 



will be the fourth chapter of Lamb- 
da Chi Alpha in Colorado. The 
other chapters are: Alpha Pi at 
University of Denver, Gamma Pi at 
Colorado Agricultural college, and 
Gamma Mu at University of Colo- 
rado. 



THE TIGER 



Friday, September 22, 1933 




s' 



Acting Editor LEW CROSBY 

Business Manager EVERETT STAPLETON 

+Cherrio 

to President Mierow and to his family as they start upon a year of 
travel. We have enjoyed the associations engendered by their pleasing 
personalities and rejoice with Dr. Mierow at the prospect of being able 
to continue his chosen studies in ancient Rome, the cradle of classic art. 
His quiet smile, his unremitting labor in behalf of COLORADO COL- 
LEGE, and his democratic spirit have left a host of friends who wish a 
hearty "Bon Voyage," a pleasant year in study and travel, and a speedy 
return to COLORADO COLLEGE. 

^Greetings 

to Dr. C. B. Hershey with every wish for a successful administra- 
tion during the ensuing school year. This office wishes to emphasize the 
respect and esteem with which Dr. Hershey is held by the members of 
te COLORADO COLLEGE student body and to offer the fullest coopera- 
tion in making the year 1933-34 one of constructive accomplishment, 
with mutual advantages both to acting President Hershey and to the 
student body of COLORADO COLLEGE. Carry on. 

^Freshman Students 

To you who hold the future of COLORADO COLLEGE within your 
grasp, we extend the right hand of fellowship. You are entering upon 
the happiest, most carefree period of your college career. The days that 
today seem filled with strange surroundings and new environment are 
but stepping stones to a fellowship which most of you will share for 
the next four years. That fellowship means much to you and even more 
to us. Your success and happiness while members of the student body 
the COLORADO COLLEGE student body and to offer the fullest coopera- 
carry on the good work of keeping COLORADO COLLEGE the finest 
school in the Rocky Mountain region. A greeting, and an obligation. 
Good luck. 



A. A. DEGREES 




fltt 
ittmui riant 

Barbara itticnuu 




Associate in arts degrees were 
presented to 105 members of last 
year's sophomore class at the first 
chapel exercises to be held in Shove 
chapel Tuesday. Those who have 
completed the required work for the 
A. A. degree are: 

Adams, Ruth Elizabeth, Colorado 
Springs; Andrews, Stephen Gabriel, 
Walsenburg, Colo.; Arnold, Roger 
Charles, Colorado Springs; Ayres, 
Joseph Sherburne, Littletn, Coolo. 

Beach, Richard Booth, Water- 
town, Conn.; Berry, Paul Dwight, 
Colorado Springs; Bennett, Billie, 
Albuquerque, N. M. ; Bernard, Gil- 
bert Cress, Colorado Springs; Bo- 
hon, John Graham, Manitou, Colo.; 
Brooks, Richard Ensign, Colorado 
Springs; Burnham, Janet Mary, 
Colorado Springs. 

Chilcott, Carl Thomas, Colorado 
Springs; Cochrane, John Preston, 
Colorado Springs; Corrin, Joseph 
Benjamin, Jr., Colorado Springs; 
Costello, Albert Anthony, Salida, 
Colo.; Crawford, Ruth Tillinghast, 
Colorado Springs; Crosby, Lewis 
Clayton, Oklahoma City, Okla. 

Davis, Clyde Webster, Pueblo, 
Colo.; Day. John Arthur, Colorado 
Springs; Dentan, Helen Marilla, 
Colorado Springs; Derby, George 
Jerome, Hastings, Nebr. ; Dewing, 
Charles Edward, Colorado Springs; 
Dorlac, Mary Leona, Colorado 
Springs. 

Ebeling, Ray Clark, Colorado 

i Springs; Edward, Robert Emery, 

! Colorado Springs; Effinger. Cecil 

Stanley, Colorado Springs; Engel, 

Harriet Blanche, Colorado Springs. 

Fisher, Mary Henderson. Colo- 
rado Springs; Foster, Elizabeth 
Edith, Montrose, Colo-; Fowler, 
Lindsay Baker, Harrisville, W. Va. ; 
Frantz, Phyllis Lucelia, Pueblo, 
Colo.; Fuquay, Edna Mae. Everett, 
Washington. 

Garrett, Norma May, Colorado 
Springs; Gill, Audrey Corlett, Colo- 
rado Springs; Gilmore. Helen, Colo- 
rado Springs; Gray, John William, 
Spring Green, Wis.; Grimwood, Al- 
fred Ernest, Colorado Springs. 

Hall, Francesca Tudor, Colorado 
Springs; Harrison, Richard Knight, 
Colorado Springs: Heaton, Eliza- 
betht Jean, Pueblo, Colo.; Hed- 
bloom, Earland Everett, Colorado 
Springs; Heinicke, Alfred Franz, 
Colorado Springs; Hibbard, Donald 
Ayers, Colorado Springs; Hiskey, 
Edith Pearl, Colorado Springs; 
Hoag, Mary Jessie, Colorado 
Springs; Howell, John R. Graves, 
Colorado Springs; Huff, Don Henry, 
Colorado Springs. 

Johnson, Caroline Louise, Colo- 
rado Springs; Jordan, Emma- 
Louise, Colorado Springs. 

Kearney, Harriette M i c h a e 1 a. 



Colorado Springs; Kelly, Robert 
Salmons, New York, N. Y.; Killian, 
Ann Magdaline, Colorado Springs. 
Lagerborg, Dorothy Louise, Colo- 
rado Springs; Larson, Wilbur Hen- 
dricks, Colorado Springs; Lee, Rob- 
ert Pierce, Colorado Springs; Lewis, 
Frances Imogene, Colorado 
Springs; Little, Edward, Colorado 
! Springs; Livingston, John Arthur, 
Colorado Springs; Lowe, Joseph, 
Pueblo, Colo. 

McCoy, Mary Margaret, Colorado 
(Springs; Mansfield, Mary Grace, 
Colorado Springs; Markley, Charles 
Sidney, Jasper, Tex.; Miller, Ellis 
Swartsel, Colorado Springs; Miller, 
| Karlton Bethel, Colorado Springs; 
Mitchell, L. Isabel, Colorado 
Springs; Moshisky, Janet, Montrose, 
Colorado. 

Ostdiek, Aelred Francis, Colorado 
Springs. 

Pachak, Anne Elizabeth, Pueblo, 
Colo.; Paterson, Thomas George, 
', Jr., Larkspur, Colo.; Pelsor, Gene 
Thomas, Colorado Springs; Perkins, 
i Joe Gish, Colorado Springs; Per- 
| kins, Van Kirk Brigham, Colorado 
Springs; Piatt, Elizabeth Aurella, 
Alamosa, Colo-; Poley, Linn Swart- 
ley, Colorado Springs; Polley, 
James Elihu, Glen Kam, Ohio. 

Rasor, Robert William, Pueblo, 
Colo. ; Rayner, Elizabeth Mary, 
Lake Forest, 111.; Reid, Margaret 
Ward, Colorado Springs; Richert, 
Paul Jerome, Colorado Springs; 
Riddell, John Tate, Jr., Evanstown, 
111.; Roberts, Jane Fisher, Colorado 
Springs; Robinson, Florence Car- 
ver, Lexington, Mass.; Robinson, 
George Franklin, Colorado Springs; 
Rohrer, Mary Katherine, Colorado 
Springs; Rothrock, Nancy Alice, 
Colorado Springs; Runyan, Damon 
Ogden, Scottsbluff. Nebr.; Ryerson, 
Stanley Barton, Denver, Colorado. 

Simpson, Reed Morgan, Monroe, 

La.; Sims, John Arthur, Colorado 
Springs; Skidmore, Marka Doro- 
thy, Colorado Springs; Skjoldahl, 
Martha Ragna, Colorado Springs; 
Smith, Bruce Donald, Jr., Colorado 
Springs; Smith, Gerald Howard, 
Colorado Springs; Stannard, Ken- 
neth Edwin, Denver, Colorado. ; 
Swan, Claron McKean, Salt Lake 
City, Utah; Swartz. Lucile Fern, 
Pueblo. Colo.; Swem, Charles Ed- 
ward. Colorado Springs. 

Trimble, Malvina Ellyn, Colorado 
Springs; Twitchell, Raleigh Norris, 
Colorado Springs. 

Walberg, Lillian Adelaide, Colo- 
rado Springs; Walker. Jane, Colo- 
rado Springs; Weaver, Edith, Colo- 
rado Springs; Willett, Niel, Colo- 
rado Springs; Wolfe, Roy Crain, 
Tonopah, Nevada. 

Zuhlke, Helen Hilda, Littleton, 
Colorado. 



Friday, September 22, 1933 



THE TIGER 



Winners 

Marjorie Avalon, '36, rhymed 
her way to first prize in the Evelyn 
May Bridges poetry contest which 
was held under the auspices of the 
English department last year. Al- 
fred Grimwood, '35, received sec- 
ond prize. 

Miss Avalon's contribution, 'for 
which $25 was awarded, consisted 
of a series of sonnets. Grimwood 
submitted a descriptive poem en- 
titled, "The Game of Chess." His 
prize rmsunted to $15. 

Every year the English depart- 
ment awards these prizes for worth- 
while poetry. The awards are giv- 
en in the memory of the late Mrs. 
Evelyn May Bridges by her hus- 
band. 



College Men 
prefer 

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Campus Cords $4.95 

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NOTICES 
The School of Music is open for 
consultation and registration daily, 
from 9:30-12 and 2-4:30. Piano 
students needing financial aid may 
see Dean Hale. The School Office 
is room 10, Perkins Hall. 



Please notify the Secretary's of- 
fice at once if you have moved 
since registration. We want all ad- 
dresses as accurate as possible for 
the Student Directory. 



Sponsors and sponsor captains! 
Have you forgotten? Of course you 
haven't, but just in case you may 
have - - - the tea dance for spon- 
sors, sponsor captains, and spon- 
sees will take place this afternoon 
in Bemis Hall from 3:30 to 5:30. 
Don't Forget! And this for you, 
new coed — if you by any chance 
have not come in contact with your 
sponsor, come to Bemis this after- 
noos and meet her. 



All applications for editor of the 
Tiger will have applications with 

Jack Lawson before Saturday night. 

••• ••■ ••• 

Will the person who borrowed 
the typewriter from the journalism 
room in Montgomery Hall please 
return it immediately. This machine 

is needed at once for class use. 

••• .«. tat 

The School of Music will sponsor 
an operetta to be given in late No- 
vember under the direction of 
Fanny A. Tucker, Instructor in 
Voice and Singing, Room 1, Perkins 
Hall, and Maria Fielding. Instruc- 
tor in the Dance, Room 15, Perkins 
Hall. Tryouts for all voices and 
dancers will be held Monday, Tues- 
day and Wednesday afternoons at 
these studios. 

... Telephones, Main 4347-W, Main 
285, Main 4706-J. 

CHAPEL CALENDAR 
Sunday, Sept. 24, 4 p. m. Vesper 
services 

The rnnual COLORADO COL- 
LEGE Sunday will be observed with 
a service given for the college by 
the First Congregational church. 
The services were formerly held at 
the church, but will be held at 
Shove Memorial chapel, with mem- 
bers of the faculty and students in- 
vited to attend. Rev. Charles Staf- 
ford Brown will be the speaker. 
There will be special music by the 
chrpel choir. 

Tuesday, Sept. 26, 10 a. m. Chapel 
service 

The sDeaker for the occasion will 
be the Rev. W. R. Medzie, D. D., 
Secretary of Educational Institu- 
tions for the Congregational Church 
in America. 



New Book 

"Overland to the Pacific" is the 
title of the second volume in the 
series of publications on western 
history edited by Dr. Archer B. 



Hulbert of COLORADO COL- H^tory and the Denver Punlic Li- 
L£Q£ brary are publishing the di. of 

Under the general title of "South- I earl ,y )*avelers on the Santa Fe 
west on the Turquoise Trail" the \ tr£ul \ | hes< : volumes contain ma- 
Stewart Commission on Western | te 7?Y h f. has neve , r before been 

published in comprehensive form. 



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THE TIGER 



Friday, September 22, 1933 



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Department Store 



Groceries, Meats,Fruits 

WE APPRECIATE YOUR BUSINESS 



Phone 2602 
123 N. Tejon 



KNORR'S 

Market 



MEET ME 

AT 

McRae's 

RESTAURANT 

105 Phone 

Pikes Peak M. 5300 



Fresh Frosh 

cast perspiring glances over the 
yearly intelligence barometers held 
each year at Palmer hall and won- 
dered if, after all, college was the 
good time it was cracked up to be. 
Three hours later calloused profs 
opened wondering eyes at the ap- 
parent mentality of future COLO- 
RADO COLLEGE studes. The av- 
erage grade of the 1933-34 COLO- 
RADO COLLEGE freshman ranks 
the class among the best in the na- 
tion scholastically. 

First-year students who distin- 
guished themselves by attaining av- 
erages of from 90 to 97 follow: 

1 . Charles H. Strang, Colorado 
Springs High School. 

2. Herbert F. Newhall, Colorado 
Springs High School. 

3. Kenneth C. Rule, University 
of Chicago. 

4. Muriel Hess, South Denver 
High School. 

5. Mary W. Hyatt, Centennial 
High Schcol. 

6. Robert M. Tabley, Colorado 
Agricultural College. 

7. Gilmore B. Hersom, Colorrdo 
Springs High School. 

8. Betty Predovitch, Joliet Jun- 
ior College. 

9. Dori« Shock, Colorado 
Springs H.gh School. 

10. Edward O'Neil, Colorado 
Springs High School. 

1 1 . Merlin Pete, Colorado 
Springs High School. 

12. Margaret Kelley, Colorado 
Springs High School. 

Prof. William A. B'akeley, who 
was in charge of the tests, states 
that the records are equrl to those 
f past years. 



New Aims For A. W. S. 

The annual fall conference of the 
Associated Women Students was 
held at Chipita lodge, Chipita park 
September 12 and 13. Tuesday 
evening the A. W. S. had as their 
guests President and Mrs. C. C. 
Mierow. Prof, and Mrs. R. J. Gil- 
more, Mr. and Mrs. Lloyd Shaw 
and Mrs. Louise W. Fauteaux. 
Members of the A. S. C. C. attend- 
ing were Don Glidden, Virginia 
Bersrer. Fred Miles and Ed Little. 

Mr. Shaw, who was the speaker 
of the evening, pointed out many 
different plans which would not 
onlv benefit A. W. S. but also 
COLORADO CO' LEGE in general. 

A. W. S. for C. C. was the new 
motto adopted. Under this slogan 
A. W. S. will try to carry forth its 
new aims. There will be an effort 
made for men and women students 
to participate in the same activities, 
a more mutual understanding be- 
tween the faculty and student body 
and to establish more social con- 
tacts between sorority and indepen- 
dent women. 



Friday, September 22, 1933 



THE TIGER 



PORT 



The First Roar 

of the COLORADO COLLEGE 
Tiger was heard September 10 as 
a snarling pack of 28 reported to 
ringmaster "Bully" Van de Graaff 
and his assistants, "Spick" Spicer 
and Art Gray. Conditioning, per- 
fection in plays and fundamentals 
were stressed during the first week, 
in developing an offense which will 
click in the Teachers game, Sept. 
29. 

The squad, though handicapped 
by its lack of numbers has plenty 
of quality, and with the traditional 
never-say-die Tiger spirit should go 
places this year. 

With but one week remaining be- 
fore the Greeley game, "Bully" is 
polishing his charges into a snappy, 
fast charging aggregation. The 
Bears appear to be the dark horse 
of the conference and it is rumored 
that they have a formidable array 
cf bail luggers. 

At present writings, Creager 
would appear to have the inside 
track for calling signals. Roach and 
Griffiith will probably do the kick- 
ing. The other backfield positions 
will probably be filled by Funk and 
Beery. In the line LeMaster and 
Bernard look good at the ends, 
Swan and Andrews at tackles and 
Mihalick and either Carlson, Bick- 
nell or Winters at Guards. With a 
second squad of huskies nearly 
equal to the above named, COLO- 
RADO COLLEGE should be in the 
money. 

The game schedule: 

Sept. 29 — Teachers at Greeley. 

Oct. 7 — Wyoming here. 

Oct. 20— N. M. Normal here. 

N ov . 4_C. U. at Boulder. 

Nov. 11— B. Y. U. here (home- 
coming). 

Nov. 18 — Mines here. 

Nov. 25 — Aggies at Denver. 

Menu 

W. A. A. has outlined its sports 
schedule for the coming year. 
Events listed are: Tennis from 
September 25-October 25 under 
Eleanor Hastings' leadership; Tena- 
quoit from September 25-October 
25 under Norma Garrett; Basket- 
ball from November 1 -December 1 
under Betty Platte; Shuffleboard 
from November 1 -December 1 un- 
der Norma Garrett; Swimming un- 
der Clara Haeker — all the first se- 
mester; winter sports through De- 
cember and February; Baseball 
from April I -May 1 under Helen 
Dentan; the May Fete in May; 
Hiking for all year; and Archery 
during the Fall and Spring under 
the leadership of Helen Margaret 
Shaw. Any woman may become a 
member of W. A. A- by participat- 
ing in one of these sports. 



Frosh 

Twenty-three freshmen have re- 
ported for football under the guid- 
ing eyes of Ray Fries and Owen 
Owens, ex-varsity stars. All indica- 
tions point toward an exceptionally 
fine team, as their number is gen- 
erously sprinkled with prep stars. In 
the line we find such notables as 
Mclntyre, all state end from Ft. 
Collins, and Cool and Riley of C. S. 
H. S. Jay Schoyer a transfer from 
Kansas U. and a former star tackle 
there, should make history here. 
Red Schwartz a Pueble Centenial 
speedster and Vincent Young a 
triple threat from Kansas, are prom- 
ising backfield stars. 

Conditioning has been the feature 
of the week, with a few light scrim- 
ages in preparation for a tangle with 
the varsity tomorrow morning. 

The remaining Cub roster and a 
schedule of their games follows: 

Frank Von Steege of Alamosa; 
Wayne Meil, Fort Collins; Harold 
Haines and Kenneth Hall of Den- 
ver; Dick Alderson, Withers Cool, 
Jim Mclntyre, Curtis Perryman, Jim 
Riley, Norman Trainor, John John- 
sen, Marcus Shivers, Hobart Corn- 
ing, Kenneth Deppen, Russell Van 
Skike, Jimmy Roberts, Tom Dilling- 
ham, Howard Dostal, Willis Arm- 
strong, Grant Lester, all of Colo- 
rado Springs. 

The Tiger Cubs play only two 
games this season. The first is with 
the D. U. Yearlings at Denver on 
Oct. 27- On Thanksgiving day they 
meet Mines frosh, here. 



^IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIMIMMIIMIIMIIMMIMIMIIIMIMMIMIIIIMMIMIIIIHIIMIIIIIIIIIMIMMIIIIMIMMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIA 



Denver's Flood Area 

served as a background for an 
exciting return trip for the board 
members of W. A. A. who were 
guests of Miss Marion Fezer at her 
cabin "Rockhurst-on-the-Poudre" 
the week-end of September 8. 

Enioyable events numbered dur- 
ing the four days' outing included 
fireplace pow-wows at which new 
elections took place and plans for 
the future year discussed, an all- 
dav hike to Lake Agnes, and a val- 
uable exchange of ideas with Miss 
Elizabeth Forbes, Miss Ruth Prout, 
and Miss Bertha Smith, all mem- 
bers of the Women's Physical Edu- 
cation Department at Colorado 
Agricultural College. 

Cross Country 

All men interested in cross coun- 
try will see Jo Irish at once as 
workouts begin immediately. The 
annual inter-fraternity meet will be 
held between the halves of a foot- 
ball game this fall, date to be an- 
nounced later. A tentative dual 
meet with Denver University is 
planned this year. Freshmen are 
eligible. 




^Chc one and only 

COLLEGE 
CLEANERS 

for 

College People 



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Main 



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Freshmen, Sophomores, Juniors, Seniors and Faculty- 
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BOOKS 



C. C. and 
FRATERNITY 
STATIONERY 



Official Distributors 

Colorado College Text Books 

AND SUPPLIES 

The Murray Drug Co. 

Across from the Campus 
832 N. TEJON 21 S. TEJON 



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from Five Famous Makes 

From Sheaffer, Wahl-Eversharp, Parker, Waterman and 
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Reading Lamps. Coio.aJo Sr.inns Colo, 



THE TIGER 



Friday, September 22, 1933 



AS ADVERTISED IN 
VOGUE AND HARPER'S BAZAAR 



CAMj to K/fcO/f 

VASSARETTE 





bo light and supple . . . you 
have to remind yourself you're 
wearing a Vassarette Girdle. It's 
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and will keep your curves con- 
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The Dude From Boston 

was the clever costume chosen 
by Dean Fauteaux at the clever 
supper given last Sunday by the 
W. A. A. in honor of new women 
students at COLORADO COL- 
LEGE. In the costume competition 
Mary Jo Sparkman as the "Hotcha 
Maiden From Honolulu" wiggled in 
for first honors. Jane Wahtola, 
wealing a replica of Mae West's 
"hourglass" and Louise Arens as 
"The Lille French Maid" furnished 
serious competition. 

Normr Garrett headed the invi- 
tation committee and an excellent 
menu was offered through the ef- 
forts of Helen Dentan. 



Neophytes 

"When the smoke of the battle 
cleared" the four Greek letter wom- 
en fraternities announced the Fall 
pledging of the following girls: 

Beta Delta of Delta Gamma: 
Betty Anderson, Fort Morgan; 
Susan Braerton, Denver; Jean 
Carney, Greeley; Adelaide Dix- 
| on, Pueblo; Virginia Graham, 
Denver; Pauline Hoopes, 
Colorado Springs; Martha Frances 
Howell, Colorado Springs; Caro- 
lyn Hurley, Clayton, N. M,; Jean 
James, Denver; Ruth Liverman, 
Denver; Helen Meinholtz, Colorado 
Springs; Wilhelmina Meinholtz, 
Colorado Springs; Ellen Louise 
Perry, Denver; Virginia Thornton, 
Colorado Springs; Helen Walker, 
Denver; Dorothy Weaver, Colorado 
Springs; Imogene Young, Pueblo. 

Beta Omega of Kappa Alpha 
Theta pledged the following; Gra- 
tia Adams, Brookline, Mass.; Eliza- 
beth Chaney, Denver; Ann Espe, 
Santa Fe, N. M.; Anne Florey, 
Colorado Springs; Lucile Hampton, 
Monte Vista; Ruth Anne Johnson, 
Denver; Miriam Rothgerber, Den- 
ver; Martha Louise Statton, Monte 
Vista; Ruth Mary Webster, Denver. 

The pledges of Alpha Phi of 
Gamma Phi Beta are: Mary Eliza- 
beth Figge, Silver Cliff; Muriel 
Hess, Denver; Helen McCandish, 
Colorado Springs; Reba Haney, 
Colorado Springs; Betty Reid, Fort 
Morgan; Elizabeth Richter, Den- 
ver; Marguerite Ridge, Colorado 
Springs: Doris Shock, Colorado 
Springs; Virginia Botsford, Monte 
Vista; Elizabeth Dewing, Colorado 
Springs; Barbara Dutton, Pueblo; 
I uzilla Eubank, Colorado Springs; 
Edith Southard. Greeley; Bertha 
Trotter, Colorado Springs; Doris 
Wylvie. Denver; Esther Alexander, 
Burlington, Colo. 

Delta Zeta of Kappa Kappa 
Gamma pled«e the following: Lucy 
Blackmail, Tulsa. Okla.; Martha 
Jane Blackmail, Colorado Springs; 
Mary Gilmore, Colorado Springs; 



Carrie Coed's Letters 

Dear Sis: 

Rush week is over and we can 
all settle down now to pursuing the 
elusive education, but I must tell 
you about some of the parties. 

Friday noon I tripped forth to a 
Delta Gamma cabaret luncheon at 
their chapter house. They had 
small tables all around the room 
with decorations and flowers in 
their colors of bronze, pink and 
blue. Dancing occupied us all be- 
tween courses, with a grand floor 
show during the main course. There 
were some very cute tap numbers, 
a solo dance, and some blues from 
Marian MacMillan. Dodo Skidmore 
lent color and atmosphere by play- 
ing cigarette girl in a very realistic 
manner. 

Kappa entertained us Saturday 
afternoon at a Bohemian tea in 
Tabor Utley's studio. Such atmo- 
sphere — checked table cloths, can- 
dles in bottles, menus to order 
from, 'n everything. Betty Britain 
handed us stage money as we en- 
tered, and we found all manner of 
ways to lose it upstairs. During the 
afternoon someone cut our silhou- 
ettes and Lorna Dorlac told our 
fortunes. Dot Chamberlin passed 
cigarettes, looking very Bohemian 
in attire. It was great fun. 

From this we rushed to a Theta 
party at Mrs. Sinclair's home in 
Broadmoor. It was a dinner, in the 
hotel manner. We continually re- 
ceived wires and telegrams during 
the course of the evening. A fash- 
ion show was presented after din- 
ner. Four girls modeled the new 
fall fashions. We loved it. Songs 
completed the evening. 

The "House of Fu Manchu" was 
entered Sunday afternoon at t h e 
Gamma Phi house. We ate Chinese 
food in a Chinese manner with Chi- 
nese decorations all around us. It 
was so cute— chop sticks, chop 
suey and queer coolies and candies, 
we had our fortunes told later. 

All in all, what with many other 
parties just as clever and nice, rush 
week was a whirl. Now all I need 
is a bid to one of them to be per- 
fectly happy. 

See you soon, and look hopefully 
for a pledge button. 

Yours in a rush, 

CARRIE. 



Dorothy Jameson, Colorado 
Springs; Helen Kirk, Pueblo; Car- 
olyn Morrison, Colorado Springs; 
Margaret Simpson, C o lo r a d o 
Springs; Frances Stevenson, Colo- 
rado Springs; Priscilla Swan, Pitts- 
field, 111.; Mary Tyson, La Grange, 
111. 




nnouncing 



our appointment as 
Sole Accredited Distributors for the 

Crosby Square 

SHOES 

$6.50 

Where ever you go you will find 
the under-graduate preferring this 
wing-tip shoe, year in and year out. 

PERKINS- 
SHEARER 

COMPANY 



"You're Sure It's Pure" 

Plantation 
Stick 25c lb. 

An old favorite — creamy 
centers with molasses- 
flavored outside shell. A 
most pleasing combina- 
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23rd. 



26 S. Tejon 



Bern's J 



GRAND CAFE 

105 South Tejon 
Main 398 
A Cheese Sandwich and 

a Stein of Beer — 15<^ 



Friday, September 22, 1933 



THE TIGER 



9 



Paddles Will Swing 



on 80 hopeful pledges of COLO- 
RADO COLLEGE fraternities whose 
debut in the social whirl was made 
in pledging Saturday night. Buttons 
were distributed to representatives 
of every section of the United 
States, listing California on the 
west and Massachusetts'on the east. 

Pledges announced by Kappa 
Sigma were George Fisher, Edward 
McKea, Norman Traynor, Jake 
Johnson, George Miller, Kennth 
Deppen, Frank von Steeg, Raymond 
Price, William Tudor, Thomas 
Ross, Russ van Shyke and Irving 
Roberts. 

Sigma Chi neophytes numbered 
John Dickey, Curtis Perryman, 
James Riley, George Clamp, Rich- 
ard Alderson, Herbert Conzen, Jim 
Roberts, Robert Stagg, Loring 
Lennox, Tom Mclntyre, Wayne 
Neil, Maxwell Frick, Charles Mc- 
Donald, and George Villars. 

In Phi Gamma Delta's pledge 
group were Harold Packard, Rob- 
ert Razor, Willis Armstrong, Bud 
Alston, Jack Green, Dick Alston, 
Jim Ranson, Hoeart Corning, Jim 
Mclntyre, Jack Murray, Marcus 
Shivers, Bob Walsh, Charles Woess- 
ner, Bill Frey, Vincent Young, Jay 
Shreyer, Owen Wright, Joe Rustin, 
and Joe Hardwick. 

Phi Delta Theta pledged Fritz 
Baker, Bud Udick, Bert Price, Carl 
Swartz, Dudley Bruce, Kenny Hall, 
Otis Elliot, Russell Lohnbakken, 
Ted Knecht, Gilmore Hersom, Bud 
McMahon, Howard Dostal and 
Charles Dewing. 

Beta Theta Pi: Withers Cool, 
William Paddock, Stanley Reid, 
Herbert Dorricott, Edward O'Neil, 
William Sode, Gene Gustavson, 
James Walsh, Wilmer Hemming, 
Charles Webb, Roy Wolfe, Tom Dil- 
lingham, Ronald Rolph, Dave Bak- 
er, Harrison Lee, and Lee Gross. 

Delta Alpha Phi: Bill Davis, Gil- 
bert Verba, Bob Hayward, Richard 
Jones, Bob Glew, and Paul House. 



mmm i nm i tmm i innmmm tii mmt 



A Typwriter 

— an Aid to Education 

The investment is small — 
payment as low as $4.00 a 
month may be made — and we 
carry every make machine. 



The 

Typewriter 

Man 



125 N. Tejon St. 
Phone Main 95 




nrmn miiiii nni i ii iiiiiii i i ituni iii m' it 



JVlucli lias been printed 
about tobacco 



"cool" "burns slowly" 
"doesn't smoke hot" "don't bite" 

And all of these things can be 
said about Granger — the tobacco 
that's made to smoke in a pipe. 

Granger is made of White 
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a sensible package 
10 cents 





ranger Rough Cut 

_the tobacco that's MADE FOR PIPES 



© 1933, Liggett & Myers Tobacco Co. 



IRA C. DUGAN 

Jeweler and Optometrist 

Fine Watch and Clock Repairing 

Eyes Examined — Glasses Fitted 

— Lenses Duplicated — 

Phone Main 1702-J 9 N. Tejon St. 



|pOL>I>EGBb 
^ "INN" 

ACROSS FROM MURRAY'S 



CANDIES AND NUTS 
FOR ALL OCCASIONS 

HUGHES 
CANDY SHOP 

128 N. TEJON 



10 



THE TIGER 



Friday, September 22, 193: 





OF THE TOBACCO 
PLANT 



Because . . . 

we use only fine center 
leaves, no stems, no stalks 

We actually discard ?>£>% 
of the tobacco plant. 
Because we use only the 
fine center leaves — no 
stem — no stalk. And each 
Lucky comes to you fully 
packed with ripe, mel- 
low, choice tobaccos — 
round and firm — no loose 
ends. Is it any wonder 
that Luckies are always 
so mild — so smooth? 



ALWAYS thejtnest tobaccos 
ALWAYS the finest workmanship 
Always Luckies please! 



«L 




;•:•:•:•:•:•:•:•:•:*:•:••••' 



Copyright, 1983. The American Tobacco Company. 



its toasted ' 

FOR THROAT PROTECTION-FOR BETTER TASTE 




7 


m 


^^^^^B( 








' 




i '^ft*^^-^ 






. 




. ^ 










5" rfe^g 


p?fr 




tort**" jgE$bi 






'*•-•- '- - 




* 






I 




■ '">., 





Where The TICKER K 



oams 



Issued each week during: the academic year. Entered at the'ost Office at Colorado Springs a* Second-Class Matter. 



THE TIGER 



Friday, September 29, 192 





Turkish tobacco is 
packed thousands 
of tiny leaves to the 
hale. It averages 
400 leaves, a pound. 



Tobaccos grown in this 

country are "seasoned" 
with tobaccos from 
Turkey and Greece 

THE ANSWER IS VERY SIMPLE: 



TOBACCOS to taste right in a 
cigarette need to be flavored 
or seasoned just the same as you 
might season a steak or a pudding. 

No tobaccos have ever been 
found that equal the spicy aro- 
matic tobaccos of Turkey and 
Greece for this purpose. That's 
why we send 4000 miles for aro- 
matic tobaccos from Samsoun and 
Smyrna, Xanthi and Cavalla. 

When blended and cross- 
blended in just the right amounts 
with Chesterfield's mild ripe Do- 
mestic tobaccos, the result is a 
rich flavor and a fine fragrance. 

Chesterfields are seasoned right 
— they taste right. May we sug- 
gest you try them. 



tL 



kesterileld 



/'(//<• ///rtlj milder . . . the* cigarette fnat tastes better 



cf/iarr 

<c) l<m. I.if.'.rrr \- Mymh Tru 



Tigers Always Welcome 
PAYTON STUDIO 

Th« Plao« for i,<*«\ I'lmtogrnphy 
r.ii and Styl.'* for Kvcry Pun* 
80 8. T»jon o»»r Robbin* on the Corner 



CANDIES AND NUTS 
FOR ALL OCCASIONS 

HUGHES 
CANDY SHOP 

128 N. TEJON 



GRAND CAFE 

105 South Tejon 
Main 398 
A Cheese Sandwich and 

a Stein of Beer — 15<^ 



NOTICES 

All students who desire to woi 
on the Tiger are expected to be 
a meeting in the Pit (Room 3 
Palmer hall, Monday, Oct 2, 
1:30. This includes all who ha 1 
worked on The Tiger in the past 
well as new students. 
-»- .». .». 

All fraternities, sororities, ai 
other groups must have their r 
quests for social dates for the fii 
semester in Dean Fauteaux's offii 
by Tuesday, Oct. 3. 

••■ ■•■ ■•• 

Conditional examinations will 1 
held Saturday, Sept. 30. Tho 
wishing additional informant 
about the examinations should s> 
the registrar or the instructor in tl 
course in question. 

••- ••■ -•> 

Any change of address since re 
istration should be reported to tl 
office of the secretary immediate! 
The student directory will go 
press in a short time and it is d 
sired to make the directory as a 
curate as possible. 

.». .». .». 

All organizations wishing to s 
cure money from A. S. C. C. mu 
have their petition and budget 
the Associated students' box in tl 
Administration building before not 
Monday, Oct. 2. 

••• ••• ■•• 

Automobiles should not be parki 
in the driveways north of Palm 
hall. Cars parked there would hi 
der the entrance of the fire depai 
ment in case of fire. All studen 
are hereby requested to assist 
keeping these driveways clear. 
— W. V. Lovitt, 

Dean of Men. 

••* ••• ••• 

Everyone wishing to work on tl 
advertising staff of the Tiger du 
ing the coming year meet in tl 
Pit, Palmer hall, Monday at 2:3 

Orchestra Rehearsal 

An organization meeting and c 
chestra rehearsal will be held 
Perkins hall Friday, Sept. 29. 
7:15. All students who are inte 
ested are urged to be presei 
Charles William Bybee will ha 
charge of the rehearsals and w 
direct the orchestra. 



Colorado College 

TEXT BOOKS 

AND SUPPLIES 

C. C. and Fraternity 

Stationery 

Murray Drug Co. 

Across From the Campus 



THE TIGER 



VOLUME XXXVI 



COLORADO COLLEGE WEEKLY NEWS-MAGAZINE 



NUMBER 2 



♦ e A M P u 



♦ Comedy 



Two Hips 

and a hurray — is the jaw tilting 
description the show girl in "The 
Damsel in Distress" gives her job 
and co-authors Ian Hay and P. G. 
Wodehouse should know what they 
were writing about. This d u o of 
gloom chasers have long been 
known for their efforts in the fields 
of the short story, novel and the 
stage. "The Damsel in Distress" is 
one of their frothiest. A lilting, 
aughing farce, sandwiched be- 
tween a musical comedy setting 
and bits of Macheavalian humor 
which would bring smiles to t h e 
weather-beaten exterior of a wood- 
en Indian cigar advertisement, the 
show has, in the parlance of those 
who delight in excusing bad eyes 
with a pair of opera glasses, "what 
it takes." 

Koshare of Colorado college is 
■offering "The Damsel in Distress" 
in keeping with a tradition origi- 
nated some years ago of giving the 
first production of the season over 
to those who are new to the gal?xy 
of college dramatic satellites. This 
season the largest number of hope- 
fuls ever listed, 75 to be exact, 
answered the first call and interest 
to date has assured Director Arthur 
G. Sharp, Jr. of a winner. Dates 
for the two-night performance will 
be announced later. 

Season tickets, admitting the 
holder to four major productions 
and the Christmas pageant play, 
"Eager Heart", are still on sale for 
a limited time. 



Concert Series 

Much interest has been mani- 
fested in the recent announcement 
that Colorado college students are 
to be given an opportunity to wit- 
ness a series of concerts to be pre- 
sented by Robert Slack and Arthur 
M. Oberfelder. Such prominent ar- 
tists as Lawrence Tibett, Richard 
Crooks and Carola Goya are sched- 
uled to appear. 

The first of the concerts will be 
held Saturday, Oct. 21, with Law- 
rence Tibbett. The next will be 
held on March 6, when Vladmir 
Horowitz entertains. On January 
1 7. Richard Crooks whose Metro- 
politan operatic debut created a 
sensational success will be here. 
November 15, Hall Johnson, fam- 
ous colored entertainer will be pres- 
ent with his famous choir of 30 se- 
lect negro voices. 

Jack Kintz is in charge of tickets 
for the series. 



New Course Offered 

Colorado college students have 
the privilege of aligning themselves 
with the new course in fundamen- 
tals of gesture and stage deport- 
ment now offered with the coordi- 
nation of Dean Hale through the 
music department, and under the 
direct supervision of Miss Ruth 
Langston, graduate of Horner con- 
servatory, Kansas City, Mo. 

Miss Langston, in addition to 
training in the dramatics school at 
the conservatory has also two years 
experience with the National Pro- 
ducing company as professional 
background. She will be associated 
with Colorado college under the 
same affiliation as Dean Hale and 
her students will have the privilege 
of college credit if they desire. 

Miss Langston's studio is located 
at 817 N. Tejon. Her telephone 
number is Main 2133-W. At pres- 
sent Miss Langston is producing 
the current drama club production, 
"Mary the Third." 

Registration 

Latest figures on registration 
show 553 students enrolled in Colo- 
rado college. Of these 247 are 
women and 306 are men students. 

Enrollment by classes is as fol- 
lows: 

Freshmen, 172; Sophomores, 
118; juniors, 135; seniors, 92; 
and graduate, special, and visiting 
students, 36. 



Choir 

Many new singers have joined 
the Colorado college chapel choir 
and it is preparing for another year 
under the direction of Dr. Frederick 
Boothroyd. The choir sings at the 
vesper services which are held in 
Shove Memorial chapel the last 
week of every month as well as at 
the regular Tuesday services. 

Practice begins each Monday and 
Wednesday at 4:30 and attendance 
must be regular if credits are to be 
granted. One-fourth credit is giv- 
en each semester or a full credit for 
two years work. 



Bemis Elects 

Presidents for second, third, and 
fourth floors were elected recently 
at Bemis hall. They are Ruth For- 
bush, second floor; Mauguerite 
Dixon, third floor; and Virginia 
Graham, fourth floor. It is the duty 
of the presidents to see that the 
halls are kept quiet at all times. 
Complaints of any sort are taken 
to the presidents, who in turn pre- 
sent them to the Quadrangle asso- 
ciation officers. 



Dr. Henry Suzzallo 

Dr. Henry Suzzallo, originator of 
the new plan at Colorado college, 
died Sept. 25, at Seattle, Washing- 
ton. He was 58 years of age. 

Two years ago Dr. Suzzallo made 
an extensive survey of conditions 
at Colorado college, and recom- 
mended the new plan of dividing 
the college into various schools, and 
offering the Associate in Arts de- 
gree. 

Dr. Suzzallo was president of the 
University of Washington from 
1915 to 1926. He has been presi- 
dent of the Carnegie foundation for 
the advancement of teaching since 
Aug. 1, 1930. 



Newspaperman 

Various functions of the Asso- 
ciated Press will be explained and 
some of his experiences as a news- 
paperman abroad will be related 
by Edward Stanley, Ex- 1924, when 
he addresses journalism classes of 
Colorado college. The address is 
slated for Thursday, Nov. 2, in 
Montgomery hall. 

Mr. Stanley is chief of the AP 
bureau in Denver. He has long 
been connected with the Associ- 
ated Press both in this country and 
abroad, particularly in England. 



Faculty Picnic 

One day each year the faculty 
forgets woes and cares, Shake- 
speare and test tubes and goes to 
Camp Colorado for its annual pic- 
nic. 

This year the picnic will be held 
Saturday, Sept. 30, at Camp Colo- 
rado near Woodland Park. The 
high light of the day will be a real 
old fashioned picnic dinner, served 
at noon. 

All members of the faculty, their 
wives and families attend. 



"Chance or Purpose" 

"Reduced to the simplest terms, 
the universe is either chance or pur- 
pose", said Rev. W. R. Kedzie, D. 
D., in his chapel address Tuesday. 
Rev. Kedzie is secretary for educa- 
tional institutions of the Congrega- 
tional church. 

"If it is purpose," he continued, 
"then we must ask our selves the 
questions What? and Why?" These 
purposes when applied to our own 
existence should prove that the 
glory of life comes in serving, not 
in being served; in loving, not in 
being loved." He then offered the 
conclusion that if this policy be ac- 
cepted and applied, most of the 
worlds ailments would vanish. 



♦ No Election 

Without Editor 

No Tiger editor was elected 
Thursday night by the publications 
board due to the necessity of hav- 
ing an additional member on t h e 
board, bringing it to a total of sev- 
en. The board referred the matter 
to the A. S. C. C. council which 
meets Tuesday night. The council 
is expected to elect one of its num- 
ber to the chair usually occupied by 
the Tiger editor, this person to serve 
only during the election. 

The meeting last night was made 
necessary because Dave Scott, the 
editor elected last semester, did not 
return to school. The members of 
the publications board who partici- 
pated in the meeting were, J. F. 
Lawson, chairman, Dr. R. J. Gil- 
more, Don Glidden, Ladislaus de- 
Holczer, Ruth Laughlin, and Ever- 
ett Stapleton. 

Council Elects 

Elections to fill four student of- 
fices occupied the A. S. C. C. 
council Tuesday night. Ruth Laugh- 
lin was elected a member of t h e 
publications board; Harry Fontius, 
homecoming chairman; Dick Hall, 
traditions chairman; and Henry 
Finger, enthusiasm chairman. 

Henry Finger was seated as jun- 
ior man, taking the place of Ed 
Little, who is not in school. Tues- 
day night's meeting was the first of 
the scholastic year. 



Of Interest To A. W. S. 

A tea dance for Colorado college 
women will be held in Bemis hall. 
Oct. 12. Good music and an inter- 
esting program has been promised. 

New members who have been 
elected to the Associated Woman 
Students' legislative board are 
Marie Hoag, Kappa Alpha Theta 
representative; Martha Skjoldahl. 
junior representative; Helen Walk- 
er, quadrangle representative; and 
Francesca Hall, W. A. A. represen- 
tative. 

A program is being planned 
which will bring all the girls in 
Colorado college into one section at 
the football games. It is believed 
that this will create more enthusi- 
asm on the part of the girls as a 
whole. 

The attention of all new girls is 
called to the A. W. S. room on the 
second floor of Palmer, which can 
be used for recreation or study. 



THE TIGER 



Friday, September 29, 1933 



THE TIGER 




Acting Editor - 
Business Manager 



- - JOSEPH LOWE 
EVERETT STAPLETON 



^A Friendly School 

While the belt line is a tradition at Colorado college it is not a 
form of torture. The performance yesterday was a form of chastisement 
used each year, but it does not reflect the school's attitude toward fresh- 
men. Years ago, it seems it was almost a necessity for the life of the 
freshman to be hard and filled with all sorts of punishment. But times 
have changed. 

Now it is the desire of the college and the student body to be as 
helpful as possible to all new students. Much more can be learned by 
courteous helpfulness than by rough methods. It is hoped that each 
year this spirit will prevail in a greater degree, adding further to the 
name C. C. has earned as being a friendly school. 

^Enthusiasm 

School spirit is the usual subject for an editorial this time of year, 
especially as the football season shifts into high. This year it appears 
there is little need for harping on the subject as school spirit appears 
to be better than usual. A boosting school spirit is a necessity for a 
winning team. An enthusiastic team and an enthusiastic student body 
can accomplish wonders. Remember the Praying Colonels? It was 
school spirit that carried them thru. 

While Colorado college students and football teams may not rise 
to superhuman heights, they have in the past shown that they could 
rise above the ordinary. The reputation of Colorado college, its stu- 
dents, faculty and alumni has spread far and wide. And it has been 
the school spirit, the enthusiasm, which has done it. 

+More Music 

At various times thruout the years something is said about the 
school band and orchestra. At times the two organizations have ap- 
peared to be headed for oblivion, but always before it was too late 
something has happened to bring them back to life. 

The need for such music groups is self-evident. No matter how 
good or how bad they are, students will still cheer them if only they will 
put in an appearance more often. The more they appear before the 
students the greater they will grow. 



♦ Exchanges 

Oredigger comes thru as the first 
college newspaper in the Rocky 
Mountain conference to join the N. 
R. A. They express the desire that 
others follow their step. We won- 
der if they solicited this opportun- 
ity. 



Poison gas antidote has been dis- 
covered by Dr. J. H. Draize, mem- 
ber of the University of Wyoming 
faculty. It is said to be very effec- 



tive against carbon monoxide. 

••« ••« ••• 

Tubbing tank for the beneft of 
freshmen who might be somewhat 
obstinate is being constructed on 
the Aggies campus. This is being 
built to supplant the traditional 
belt line. 



Dr. Emmetl Martin, member of 
the research staff of the Carnegie 
institution, has returned to Santa 
Barbara, Calif, after completing 
the summer experiments in the Al- 
pine Laboratory in Manitou. 



Jungle Jargon 

It looks as though the Delta 
Gammas can really throw a pledge 

dance this year It has been 

rumored Pinky Swartz and her 
Beta are having difficulties these 
days — Lyda Roark received a beau- 
tiful green enamel cigarette case, 
compact and ring the other day. 
No card enclosed. She suspects 
Fred. We wonder — Ray Lowell 
looks faintly reminiscent of dia- 
gram C in Darwin's Evolution of 
Man. 

Fannie Buckley is such a sweet 

looking young thing We see 

that a Sigma Chi pin has been 
eliminated from the D. G. house. 
What will Gardner do now? And 
Foster can't seem to get away from 
the Sigma Chi's. McClintock this 
time. Love is the sweetest thing. 
. . . . We saw Gracia Adams and 
Phyllis Frantz together the other 
day. What a contrast. . . . Wonder 
when the Gamma Phis will sere- 
nade again. . . . deHolczer looks 
lonesome. ... Is Chilcott still lis- 
tening to "Ochay, Bebe?" Where 
is the good old masculine taste for 
battle? 

Professor Swart thoughtfully ad- 
vises his students to study, remind- 
ing them that the grades of some of 
last year's students are still being 
held in "animated suppression." 

Gaylord and her Beta friend are 
happy again. ... Or do our eyes 
deceive us? ... . The good old 
soap and water remedy seems to be 
rather popular around Bemis these 
days. We understand that some of 
the staff members and students 
went "leaf and bough" gathering 
in the woods Sunday and returned 
home with arms loaded with 
bunches of beautiful poison ivy. 
According to them, they thought 

poison ivy had five leaves 

Question: What collegian has gone 
anti-Bemis? 



Commandments 

for freshmen on the Utah cam- 
pus as published in their paper are 
of a very stringent nature this year. 
Freshmen are not allowed to wear 
high school insignia of any kind. 
One can sympathize over that six 
bits spent on the glee club pin of 
old Cucumber county high school 
has to go to waste, but orders is 
orders and that bauble will have 
to be removed from the coat front. 
Second, freshmen are not allowed 
to take girls to any game or rally. 
This ruling was adopted after lead- 
ing psycho-analysists decided that 
such close proximity on the part of 
the opposite sex led to an unhealthy 
nervous condition among those still 
in the adolescent period. Third, 
underclassmen are denied the privi- 
lege of wearing a mustache. As if 
they could! This is one thing the 
frosh and sophs have in common. 



♦ More Pep 

No little pep and enthusiasm 
were displayed at the first pep meet- 
ing held in Perkins hall Thursday 
morning. Coach W. T. "Bully" 
Van de Graaff addressed the stu- 
dent body and assured all Tiger 
fans that the 1933 edition of the 
Colorado college football team is 
as full of fight, pep, and determina- 
tion as last year's squad which won 
second place in the Eastern divi- 
sion of the Rocky Mountain con- 
ference. 

Henry Finger, enthusiasm chair- 
man, had charge of the pep meet- 
ing at which four frosh candidates 
for yell leader were brought before 
the student body. By popular ap- 
plause the students chose Dave 
Baker, Beta Theta Pi pledge as the 
third member of the trio which will 
radiate pep this year. 

Immediately following the as- 
sembly, the freshman boys ran the 
longest gauntlet seen at C. C. in 
many years. 

Fire Captains 

Fire captains for Bemis hall have 
been chosen by Miss Marion Fezer, 
physical education director for 
girls. They are: Lyda Rroak, Vir- 
ginia Graham, Martha Statton, El- 
len Perry, Betty Heaton, Mary Eliz- 
abeth Pitts, Kay Lingham, and 
Edith Forbush. The duty of the fire 
captains is to see that the building 
is efficiently and quickly emptied in 
case of fire, and each captain is in 
charge of certain girls. 

Fire drills will be called by Miss 
Fezer at least once a month. The 
drills will not be at any specific 
time, but will be planned to take 
the girls by surprise. 



Koshare to Travel 

Koshare will make a road trip 
thru the state some time during 
spring vacation, according to a 
tentative announcement issued by 
Arthur G. Sharp, Jr., director of 
dramatics at Colorado college. 

Plans, which as yet are not def- 
inite, indicate that a special cast 
will be selected to produce plays 
suitable for the trip. 






Alpha Kappa Phi 

A prominent citizen of Colorado 
Springs will speak on an economic 
subject at t h e Alpha Kappa Psi 
meeting Wednesday, Oct. 4, at 
7:30 in Cossitt commons. It will 
be open to members of the stu- 
dent body. 

Alpha Kappa Psi held its first 
meeting of the scholastic year 
Wednesday night. 



Friday, September 29, 1933 



THE TIGER 



PORT 



New Plans 

were formulated in the inter-fra- 
ternity council meeting Monday 
night with regard to the scheduling 
and awards given in intramural 
sports. 

Hereafter, the sports will be di- 
vided into two classifications with 
football, track, basketball and base- 
ball listed as major sports while 
tennis, horseshoes, and swimming 
falling into the class of minor 
sports. Cups given for major 
sports will be much larger than 
those given in the lesser events, al- 
though the winners of minor titles 
may pay the additional cost and 
get a larger cup. 

Nov. 1 , was decided upon as the 
starting date for intramural basket- 
ball. 



Major Sports 

"Sprains and Bruises" from the 
Mines' Oredigger has this tit bit to 
offer; "I see where horse shoe 
pitching has been accredited as a 
sport at Mines. That pleases me, 
for if there ever was anything that 
upset me more, it was the realiza- 
tion that we had no comprehensive 
course in horse shoe pitching." On 
the same subjecl there is "I still 
maintain that ping pong is a lot 
more important than the athletic 
department will admit. Look how 
much publicity Colorado University 
has received in late years because 
of their Drowess in the kitchen table 
sport. If the ping pong contingent 
could get together with the ski 
club, the golfers, and the horse 
shoe pitchers, I think we could 
bring some pressure on the athletic 
department. Address all inquiries 
to this column." 



Annual Breakfast 

Members of W. A. A. will en- 
tertain new women students at the 
annual Austin bluffs breakfast Oct. 
7. 

Helen Margaret Shaw, Lois May 
Lear, Ruth Edwards, and Mary Jo 
Sparkman are in charge of the 
food; Florence Robinson and Clara 
Haeker are in charge of transpor- 
tation; Pauline Johnson, Catherine 
Ragle, ad LaRue Wiley, of invita- 
tions; and Harriette Kearney is in 
charge of entertainment. Those 
planning to go should be at Mc- 
Gregor at 7:30 a. m. 



And then there was the timid 

young man who preferred blondes 

because he was afraid of the dark. 
••• >•• ••• 

Sales resistance is the triumph of 
mind over patter. 



♦ Power 

and lots of it for those Teach- 
ers." In this terse manner Coach 
W. T. "Bully" Van de Graaff para- 
phrased at once his need and plan 
of attack for tonight's football 
game with State Teachers at 




"BULLY" VAN de GRAAFF 

Greeley. The northern school is 
noted for surprise attack unleashed 
at the most improbable moment 
and the Tiger mentor is not taking 
chances. Pre-season reports give 
the Greeley eleven strong prospects 
with possible weakness to lie in the 
dearth of reserve material. The 
Tiger team is entering the game to- 
night with a determination to fight 
its hardest, with slight odds in fa- 
vor of a Tiger win. 

Indications are that, with the ad- 
vantage offered by having tickets 
included in activity books, many 
C. C. students will trek northward. 
The weather should be ideal for 
football, especially under the arcs. 
A special rooting section will, as 
usual, be provided for those mak- 
ing the trip. 

Probable starting lineups: 

TIGERS Pos. TEACHERS 

Lemaster le Clifton 

Swan It Olson 

Mihalick lg Twist 

Roark..... c O'Hanlon 

Carlson rg R. Hay 

Andrews rt Murphy 

Bernard re Ratterree 

Creager qb Butler 

Funk Jib Brennecke 

Beery hb Bishop 

Roach fb Merriman 



New Game 

Topsy Turvy Tennis doubles 
meant a new and exciting game 
for new C. C. co-eds who were 
thus entertained Monday on the C. 
C. courts. Spotted balls flying 
through the air and ballons form- 
ing net hazards were but a few of 
the clever features offered in this 
original combination of sport and 
burlesque 



"Another word from you" said 
the pugnacious lady to her husband, 
"and I'm a widow! " 



Sometimes a pessimist is a man 
to whom an optimist owes money. 



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THE TIGER 



Friday, September 29, 1933 



^zeemfflt 



FASHION-BUILT 



Expert Watch and 
Jewelry repairing 

Best of luck to 
The Tigers 



oeiAi> 




SOCIAL CALENDAR 
Sept. 30— 

Faculty picnic at Camp Colo- 
rado. 
Sept. 30— 

Kappa Sigma pledge dance. 



REEMAN Fashion-Built 
Shoes for Fall and Winter 
are now on display. See the 
many new models built for 
Winter wear and stormy 
weather. They are the 
value and style leaders of 
the season. 

WuMSAoe a. 

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110 S. Tejon St. 



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FOR INFORMATION PHONE OR CALL AT 

Rumstead's 



Phone M. 597 



414 E. Dale 



Campus Chic 

Fall is here, and new ensembles 
are showing. That little purple 
wool worn by Priscilla Swan is very 
attractive, with white collar, gloves, 
shoes, and ear-rings and a trim 
purple hat. Gracia Adams wears a 
suit of pale purple, a skirt and 
swagger coat, with a yellow sweat- 
er. It's different. 

Charming, too, is the wool suit 
that Helen Walker wears with a 
chatreuse green blouse. The grey 
fur on the shoulders marks it as 
one of the season's own. They are 
likable, these new sport things. 



"You're Sure It's Pure" 

Black Walnut 
Molasses Chews 
for 25c lb. 

Fine new black walnut 
meats used in a "chewy" 
candy with a pleasing 
tang of good molasses. A 
tempting feature for Sat- 
urday, the 30th. 



26 S. Tejon 



De 



CHAPEL CALENDAR 
Oct. 3, 10 a. m.— 

Tuesday chapel service. Dean 
McMurtry, speaker. 
Oct. 4, 5:15 p. m.— 

Organ recital. Organist, Miss 
Leta Gale. Guest soloist, Mrs. 
E. S. Zell. 



rns 



r 



z ^ 



College Sunday 

The First Congregational church 
conducted the first vesper services 
in Shove chapel Sunday. "In Love 
with Living" was the title of the 
sermon delivered by Rev. Charles 
S. Brown of that church. 

The musical program consisted 
of organ numbers by Frederick 
Boothroyd, hymns by the college 
choir, and solos by Mrs. Lester 
Howard, vocalist, and Margaret 
Williams, violinist. 



COLLEGE 
Shoe Shop 

AND 
SHINE PARLOR 

Prompt Service 
Across from Murrays 



MEET ME 

AT 

McRae's 

RESTAURANT 

105 Phone 

Pikes Peak M. 5300 



Add Pledges 

The C. C. sororities have added 
four new pledges to their list this 
week. They are Mary Jo Spark- 
man of Colorado Springs. Kappa 
Alpha Theta; Mary Hyatt, Pueblo: 
Phyllis Thompson and Winifred 
McBroom both of Colorado Springs 
whom Gamma Phi Beta pledged 
Sunday night. This makes a total 
of fifty-seven sorority pledges on 
the campus. 

*•• ■•■ ••• 

Kappa Alpha Theta held a t e a 
dance from four to six, Friday, 
Sept. 22 at the club house. 

Guests included representatives 
of all fraternities and sororities. 






Couture's 



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DYEING CO. 



We Solicit Your Patronage 

218 N. Tejon SI. 

Colorado Springs, Colo. 

Phone Main 1288 



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Shove Recital 

Leta Gale will be the organist at 
the next organ recital which is to 
be held in Shove Memorial chapel 
Oct. 4, at 5:15 o'clock. She will 
be aided by Mrs. E. S. Zell, vocal- 
ist. 



Pack Bags 
Laundry Bags 
Hikers Supplies 

THE OUTWEST 

TENT and AWNING CO. 



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Friday, September 22, 1933 



THE TIGER 




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SUPERIOR FORD SERVICE 
827 N. Tejon M. 1317 

HOW ABOUT A STUDY 
SIDELINE? 

What's that? More study? Well, yes 
and no. We've started a new Radio 
Course for you "bugs" who like to 
build or tinker with radio's. It's 
called "Theory of Radio," and is 
in charge of an expert. Classes daily 
from 8 to 9 a. m. Night School 
Classes Mondays and Thursdays at 
7 p. m. 

Blair's Business College 

DeGraff Bldg. Phone 1160 



IRA C. DUGAN 

Jeweler and Optometrist 

Fine Watch and Clock Repairing 

Eyes Examined — Glasses Fitted 

— Lenses Duplicated — 



Phone Main 1702-J 



9 N. Tejon St. 



Fellowships 

Miss Josephine Dickison, Colo- 
rado Springs, and Miss Mariana 
Sackett, Fort Collins, who gradu- 
ated from Colorado college in June, 
1933, have received fellowships to 
Mills college, Oakland, California. 

Eleven fellowships were granted 
by Mills college this year. Of these, 
six were granted to graduates of 
Mills college, three to graduates of 
Vassar and two to graduates of 
Colorado college. 



Alumnus Guest 

Edwin Foss, '26, president of the 
Golden Gate alumni chapter of 
Colorado college and Mrs. Foss 
were guests at the home of Prof, 
and Mrs. Paul E. Boucher Tuesday 
and Wednesday. 

Mr. Foss, who is assistant to the 
vice president of the Pacific States 
Telephone and Telegraph company, 
left Wednesday for Chicago with 
Mrs. Foss to attend the Century of 
Progress. 



Alumni Author 

The Omi Mission Book Depart- 
has recently published a book en- 
titled "Goro Takagi — Musician", a 
tribute by William Merrel Vories, 

LL. D. 

Author Vories is a graduate of 
COLORADO COLLEGE in the 
class of 1904 and has lived in Ja- 
pan for many years. He. is distin- 
guished both as an architect and 
as head of the Omi Mission. In 
June 1930, Dr. Vories received 
from COLORADO COLLEGE the 
honorary degree of Doctor of Laws 
on the occasion of his appointment 
as Baccalaureate speaker at his 
Alma Mater. 



Believe It Or Not 

Colorado college was represented 
at the economic conference held 
during the summer in London. 

That is, it was represented by a 
graduate of C. C, C. Kuangson 
Young of Shanghai, China. 

After completing his education 
in the United States Mr. Young re- 
turned to China and entered the 
government's service, being made 
head of the intelligence and public- 
ity department of the government 
at Nanking. He is now Chinese 
Consul General at London and was 
in this capacity an active member 
of the Chinese delegation. 



Prof. E. S. Moll, former instruc- 
tor in English at Colorado college, 
has published "The Appreciation of 
Poetry" through F. S. Crofts and 
company, New York publishers. 

Professor Moll, now at the Uni- 
versity of Oregon, has already pub- 
lished two volumes of poetry, 
"Sedge Fire" and "Native Mo- 
ments". 



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THIS NEW PARKER PEN 
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Use our circulating library for the new books 
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Department Store 



Printing 

JUL DENT AN 

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Co. 



'Phone Main 602 
23 West Colorado Ave. 

COLORADO SPRINGS 



s 



THE TIGER 



Friday, September 29, 1933 



G 



ranger smokes right 



in a pipe 

. . . because it is 
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It is the right cut. It has 
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Granger is what it says 
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a sensible package 
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ranger Rough Cut 

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We wash everything with 
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LAUNDRY 



Reward's 

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{ 19 East Bijou Street i 

I | 



W. I.LUCAS 

—HAS— 

EVERYTHING IN SPORTING 
GOODS— 

"Tigers Always Welcome" 

120 North Tejon Street 
Main 900 



WE IX) BUPERIOR WOKK 
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THE GOLDEN CYCLE 
SHINE PARLOR 

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Only one Quality and the 
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^ "INN" 

ACROSS FROM MURRAY'S 



To Maintain 
A Payroll in 
Colorado Springs 




Phone Main 577 




WHAT? 

Inter- Fraternity Dance 

WHEN? 

Saturday October 7th. 

WHERE? 

Hiawatha Gardens 

WHO? 

Johnny Metzler 






Issued each week during: the academic year. Entered at the >ost Office at Colorado Springs as Second-Class Matter. 



THE TIGER 



Friday, October 6, 1933 




t Thou Be Saved ? 

We sell For Cash and buy 

for cash, hence 

Sell For Less. 

"To be saved, or not to be, 
is the Question." 
We cannot do so against your 
will — any more — than one 
can feel the thrills of a good 
Football game, Without see- 
ing It 

Let us make a Bargain; 
You visit our popular store 
and we will go to your Foot- 
ball games. 

"Well, we go Anyway" 
You Too Be A Good Sport. 
If you come here and buy, 
You do not pay for dead 
horses, in other words, you 
do not liquidate any part, of 
the other fellows account, who 
don't pay — and your savings 
therefore is considerable. 

FURMBILT Standard 
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$17.50 

FURMBILT-DE-LUXE 

$22.50 

FURMBILT 

STORE 

20 N .Tejon 
P. L. Thorsen, Owner 




We have a service for 
every purse. 

We wash everything with 
Ivory Soap. 

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en you happen 
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a sensible package 
10 cents 





ranger Rough Cut 

_the tobacco that's MADE FOR PIPES 



© 1933. Liccbtt & Myers Tobacco Co. 

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ACROSS FROM MURRAY 



THE TIGER 



VOLUME XXXVI 



COLORADO COLLEGE WEEKLY NEWS-MAGAZINE 



Number 3 



♦ e A M P u 



+ Dr. Vories 

Alumni Speaker 

Conditions in Japan and the re- 
lation of Japan to Manchuria will 
be discussed by Dr. William Merrill 
Vories, graduate of Colorado col- 
lege is the class of 1904 and 30 
years a missionary worker in Ja- 
pan, Sunday afternoon at 4 o'clock 
in Shove Memorial chapel. Dr. 
Vories is closely connected with 
many of the movements of the Jap- 




DR. WILLIAM MERRILL VORIES 

anese government and has a knowl- 
edge of conditions there. 

Dr. Vories will be in Colorado 
Springs only Saturday and Sunday. 
On account of the hurried nature 
of the trip he will be able to be 
here only those days, instead of 
longer as had been planned. It is 
expected that he will speak Satur- 
day before some civic club. 

In 1931 Dr. Vories delivered the 
baccalaureate address at Colorado 
college, taking as his topic "Let No 
Man Despise Thy Youth". He was 
awarded the degree of Doctor of 
Laws in June 1930. 

In Japan Dr. Vories herds the 
far-famed Omi mission and is an 
architect as well. He is not only 
well known thruout the Orient, but 
in the United States also. 



The first home foolball game of 
the season will be played on Satur- 
day, Oct. 7. Tickets for the single 
game or for the season may be se- 
cured from Miss Owen. 

JO E. IRISH, 
Graduate Manager of Athletics. 



Page Sir Walt 

Visions of Sir Walter Raleigh's 
velvet coat may be brought to some 
people by "The Damsel in Distress", 
but to Colorado college freshmen it 
means their first opportunity for big 
time drama and the knowledge that 
the first production is their own. 

The production, written by I a n 
Hay and P. G. Wodehouse, author 
of such mirth-producing vehicles as 
Golf Without Tears, Hot Water, 
and Indiscretions of Archie, leaves 
little to the imagination, but gives 
much to the lungs and vocal cords. 
A show written for just such over- 
fllowing spirit as that of the year- 
ling class. 

Plans are bing made to give frosh 
salesmen a chance to sell season 
tickets for Koshare of Colorado col- 
lege productions. Selling at o n e 
dollar, they entitle the holder to 
admission to the entire 1933 billing 
of Koshare which includes four 
major productions and the twenty- 
fifth annual presentation of the 
Christmas fantasy, "Eager Heart." 
Frosh who are interested in selling 
tickets should see Emma Louise 
Jordan. This represents a chance 
to make Koshare by participating 
in the business activities of the or- 
ganization. 



Additional Pledges 

Delta Alpha Phi announces the 

pledging of Paul McConnell of 

Truckton, Fred Shantz and Ben 

Kirby of Colorado Springs. 
••> *•• *•* 

KaDpa Kappa Gamma announces 
the pledging of Lois Ward of Colo- 
rado Springs. 

••• .«. ■•• 

Beta Omega of Kaopa Alpha 

Theta announces the pledging of 

Louise Kirkpatrick of Walsenburg. 
••- ■•- ••• 

Beta Omega of Kappa Sigma an- 
nounces the pledging of Murray 

Lorenz of New Jersey. 
••• *•* ••• 

Beta Theta Pi announces the 

pledging of I ee Gross of Denver, 

and Jerry Driscoll of Colorado 

Springs. 

The publications board has ask- 
ed for applications from eligihle stu- 
dents for the position of editor of 
The Nugget, college year book, to 
fill a nossible vacancy. AnDh'cations 
must be in the hands of .1 F. Law- 
son, chairman of the board, not lat- 
er than Tuesday. 



Prexy 

A pleasant trip was experienced 
by Dr. and Mrs. C. C. Mierow and 
family from the time they left Colo- 
rado Springs until they arrived at 
New York, according to word re- 
ceived here. They sailed Saturday 
for Italy. 

The trip to New York was made 
by auto. 

Visitor 

The Rev. George Herman Wise, 
pastor of the First Baptist church 
in Fort Collins was the speaker at 
the student chape! service Tuesday 
morning. He took as his subject, 
"The Challenge that Youth Presents 
to the Church." 

Rev. Wise called attention to the 
fact that the youth of today are liv- 
ing in an age of new experiences, 
and advised that, in their under- 
takings, they should be comrades 
with the older generation. 



Alpha Kappa Psi Meets 

A small group of the nation's 
future business leaders was held 
Wednesday night in Cossitt Com- 
mons. They were led by Mr. 0. M. 
Williams, a public accountant. 
Practical points from a man who 
knows his ropes were stressed. It 
is planned to have these meetings 
every week during the regular 
school year. 

AH students are invited to attend 
as well as members of Alpha Kappa 
Psi members. 



Margaret F. Heyse is working for 
her master's degree at the Univer- 
sity of Rochester, Rochester N. Y. 



Few Engineers 

Decreased funds of the average 
student, and the announcement that 
the B. S. degree would not be given 
after the year 1934 were cited as 
possible motives for the decreased 
enrollment in the engineering de- 
partment of Colorado college by 
Prof. Okey, head of the Engineer- 
ing department. 

Even though the deoartment is 
under the supervision of one of the 
most competent instructors in the 
state, and compares favorably with 
the best equipped schools in the 
west. Prof. Okey stated that the 
enrollment this year has dropped 
considerably from that of last year. 
A total of forty students were reg- 
istered last year while this year the 
tot--4 is twenty-five. 

"Although the Bachelor of Sci- 
ence degree will not be conferred 
after '34, the school of Engineering 
will remain open to anyone who 
wishes to attend," said Professor 
Okey. 



♦ Rhodes 

C. C. Has Chance 

While the school year is just 
starting it is already time to begin 
thinking about plans for next year 
and years to follow. Information 
has been received at Colorado col- 
lege on the Rhodes scholarships. 
Applications may be handed in to 
the state secretary this year as late 
as Nov. 18. Elections will be held 
the first week in January. 

Students who desire to work for 
a Rhodes scholarship should see 
the committee for scholarships of 
which Pres. C. B. Hershey is chair- 
man. Students are nominated by 
the faculty at one of its regular 
meetings. Colorado is in the sev- 
enth district which includes Cali- 
fornia, Nevada, Arizona, New, 
Mexico. Four scholarships will go 
to each district. 

A candidate to be eligible must 
be a male citizen of the United 
States with at least five year domi- 
cile and unmarried, must have 
passed his nineteenth birthday and 
not have passed his twenty-fifth, 
and have completed at least his 
sophomore year of college. 

Colorado college has had its 
share of Rhodes scholarships. Doug- 
las McHendrie, class of 1927, re- 
ceived one of the scholarships as 
did Albert Russell Ellingwood, 1910. 



A. A. U. W. 

The American Association of 
University Women held its first 
meeting of the year in Bemis hall 
last Wednesday. The programs this 
year will be international in aspect, 
presenting music, and literature 
from foreign lands. 

All who are eligible to join the 
association are invited to get in 
touch with Mrs. Roy Bayless, 1215 
Wood avenue. 

Miss Louise Kampf is president 
of the association. 

Prof. Archer B. Hulbert delivered 
a lecture in Palmer hall Tuesday on 
the subiect of "Inland Waterways 
in the United States." This was the 
first in a series of faculty lectures 
which will be offered from time to 
time to which the students are in- 
vited. 



Miss Bessie East, head of t h e 
Collegiate Bureau of Occupations, 
will be available for interviews to 
all freshman women and others in- 
terested in Bemis hall for one week 
starting Oct. 16. 



THE TIGER 



Friday, October 6, 1933 




Acting Editor Miller Stroup 

Business Manager Everett Stapleton 



+ KINTZ 

That's the spirit, you loyal C. C. students who went to Greeley Fri- 
day night to see another fighting Tiger team in action; and how you 
cheered! When the going was hardest and the prospects blackest you 
cheered loudest; but what would you have done without smiling Jack 
Kintz to lead you? You wouldn't cheer for Anderson, you wouldn't cheer 
for Finger, but how you did cheer for Kintz. So now altogether; He's a 
Tiger! Who's a Tiger! Jack, Jack Kintz! 

♦ RHYTHM 

Let's all get together and support the first inter-fraternity dance of 
the year Saturday night. Its for all the school, and the independent men 
should be just as much interested in supporting it as the Greeks. The 
independent teams in intramural sports have the same chance of winning 
cups as fraternity teams, and the cups are paid for out of receipts of 
this dance. The committee has been very fortunate in securing Johnny 
Metzler's orchestra. In fact everything has been done to make this one 
of the outstanding dances of the school year. 

* FIVE AND TEN 

While we are on the subject of dances, it is well to note what other 
schools in the conference are doing to get the students together more 
often. 

One school has inaugurated five and ten cent all college dances once 
a week; not five and ten cents for each dance but a nickel for ladies 
and a dime for men to dance the whole evening! 

These dances are held in the college gymnasium, fraternity and 
sorority houses, and other places easily accessible to the students. The 
purpose is not to make money but to provide more social life for the 
college as a whole. 

One fraternity or sorority could well sponsor such a dance each 
week at Colorado college. Who will be the first to start? 



Initiations 

The sororities are initiating now 
for the girls they pledged the first 
of last February. 

The Gamma Phis were first. They 
held initiation last June just after 
school was out. After the ceremony 
at the chapter house there was a 
dinner dance at Stratton Park Inn. 
The girls initiated were Winifred 
Vessey, Lois May Lear, Lois Ann 
Weber, Mary Lewis, Janice Green- 
wood and Mary Elizabeth Lovitt. 

Theta's initiation is Friday at the 
Theta lodge. The initiation dinner 
is to be at Briarhurst. Margaret Ut- 
terback. La Rue Wiley, Katherine 
Ragle, Elizabeth Evans, Marybelle 
Poer and Ruth Bradley are the 
lucky ones. 

Delta Gamma initiation is Octo- 
ber 14th at the chapter house. They 
will have their formal initiation 
banquet at the Broadmoor Hotel. 
The girls on whom the anchor will 
be pinned are Betty Barrie, Cath- 
erine Corning, Jane Kimzey. Helen 
Miller. Betty Piatt, Virginia San- 
ford, and Margaret Wilm. 

The Kappa date is indefinite. 
They have to wait until the addi- 
lion on their house is completed, 
but it won't be long. 



Tandem Bicyclists 

There are ways and ways of get- 
ting to the World's Fair, varying 
from hitch-hiking to flying in an 
aeroplane, but "Punk" Harter of 
Kappa Sigma and Orville Hawver 
of Beta Theta Pi found a unique 
and very interesting way to get 
there. They left Colorado Springs 
August 27, and pedaled the 1225 
miles on a tandem bicycle to t h e 
World's Fair by September 1 1 . 
After spending a week in Chicago 
they started pedaling toward Colo- 
rado Springs, and upon arrival 
here, September 30, Harter enrolled 
in Colorado college. 



At the Chapel 

Wednesday afternoon, many mu- 
sic lovers at Shove chapel heard the 
graceful harmonies of Corelli's Con- 
certina in F. and two fine examples 
of Choral Prelude forms of Welsh 
Hymn tunes. Leta Gale, well known 
Colorado Springs organist and as- 
sistant to Frederick Boothroyd was 
assisted in presenting this recital by 
Mrs. Edward Zell, popular Colo- 
rado Springs vocalist. 

Recitals will be given semi- 
monthly. Mr. Boothroyd and Miss 
Gale will each play once a month. 



CAM PUS 
PERSONAL 



Perfection 

The Perfect Girl 

—HAS— 

Hair — Jim Growder 

Eyes — Mariam Rothgerber 

Nose — Lillian Walberg 

Mouth — Phyllis Frantz 

Teeth — Ruth Bradley 

Complexion — Lydia Roark 

Dimples — Winnie McBroom 

Brains — Loretta Kekeisen 

Form — Jane Kimzey 

Athletic Ability — Harriet Kearney 

Gift of gab — Emma Louise Jordan 

Personality — Sally Tompins 

Clothes — Mary Jean McDonald 

Wit — Catherine Corning. 

Manners — Martha Kelly 

The Perfect Boy 

— Has— 

Hair— Gale Middlestetter 

Eyes— Bud McMann 

Nose — Wilbur Larson 

Mouth — Jim Brady 

Teeth — Fred Miles 

Complexion — Carl Maynard 

Smile — Jack Kintz 

Physique — Owen Owens 

Brains — John Mihalick 

Athletic Ability — Swede Roark 

Gift of gab — Sticky Glew 

Personality — "D" Glidden 

Clothes — Lew Crosby 

Wit— Punk Harter 

Manners — Loren Marcroft 

The Perfect Prof. 

— Has— 

Hair— Mr. Powell 

Eyes — Mr. Boucher 

Nose — Mr. Latimer 

Mouth— Mr. Penland 

Teeth — Mr. Sharp 

Patience — Mr. Rose 

Smile — Mr. Dewing 

Physique — Mr. Barnes 

Brains — Mr. Hershey 

Athletic Abilitv — Mr. Van de Graaff 

Gift of gab— Mr. Okey 

Personality — Mr. Mathias 

Clothes — Miss Ellis 

Wit— Mr. Gilmore 

Manners — Mr. McMurtry 

Form — Miss Cogan 



Did they eat? - - - - everything 
from beans to smoozies at that 
Faculty Picnic held last Saturday. 
Dr. Sisam, Dr. Douglas and Presi- 
dent Hershey showed their ability 
in winning the teniquoit tournament. 
In horseshoes. Prof. Gilmore was 
declared champion bv default, com- 
peting against Prof. Brown and 
Dean Lovitt. The rest of the fac- 
ulty were engaged in gossip, noth- 
ing new, but merely used materials 
turned over kept them contented. 

The next recital will be given on 
Wednesday, Oct. 18, at five-fifteen 
p. m. 



JUNGLE JARGON 

Things we-ve always prayed for: 

That Peggy Utterback will never 
get that phone call. 

That Tompkins won't suffer a 
brain fog from too many appear- 
ances in the library. 

That the Phi Delts from now on 
will keep their pledges clad in pub- 
lic at least. 

That the Bemis gals would get 
enough to eat. 

That Gavlord would control her 
mother instinct. 

That Corning would do something 
about her hats. 

That we could have a real col- 
lege hangout where at least ten 
people could sit at once. 



What do you think of the Tyson- 
Lowell combination? Maybe we're 
wrong. Oh yes, the summer roman- 
ces, Sinton — Gray and Evens — Dan- 
iels. Well here's to 'em. Then we 
have the Kelly — Robbins combine 
working again — they always come 
back don't they Martha? We can 
say one think for Kimzey, she at 
least sticks to Sis; Chi. Look out 
Adams or you will be wearing that 
pin again. And then Willis asked the 
question — if I married — . Even with 
P. Eckles new car we see that cer- 
tain Beta is getting in. May the best 
man win. We see that M. Stewart is 
again in circulation — take your turn 
boys. Aren't Elizabeth Dewing's 
boby socks ducky? Little Finger 
about got his whole hand into it 
Friday night at Greeley. The D. G's 
have gone hoarsey — lamp the Wea- 
vers some Monday — pretty nifty I'd 
say. We wonder about that power 
M. Kimball has over brunettes. And 
then there all those signs in Bemis. 
Whats that, oh just another buzz for 
Echternach. 



The Betas would like to be their 
sister's keeper wouldn't they Mc- 
Candlish. 



CHAPEL CALENDAR 
Sunday, Oct. 8, 4:00 p. m. Vesper 
Service — 

Speaker: Dr. Wm. Merrill Vor- 
hies of Japan. He will speak on 
certain phases of recent move- 
ments in Japanese Nationalism. 
Students are urged to be present 
as it is unlikely that we shall 
have another address on the Far 
East problems this year. 
Tuesday, Oct. 10, 10:00 a. m.— 
Chapel Service 
Speaker: Dean James G. Mc- 
Murtry. 



Friday, October 6, 1933 



THE TIGER 



W. A. A. for Men. 

Possibilities of hiking for both 
men and women of Colorado college 
were discussed by Women's Athletic 
association Wednesday night. Ef- 
forts are being made to stir up in- 
terest in hikes over mountain trails 
and organize a club for men and 
women enthusiasts. 

W. A. Play day, initiation of new 
members, the archery contest spon- 
sored by the Long Bow club, the 
tennis and tenniquiot tournaments 
were all discussed at the meeting 
which was held in the Jungle club- 
house. 

Further arrangements were made 
for the ansual Austin Bluffs break- 
fast to be held Saturday. 



Visiting 

William D. Copeland, Secretary 
of the college and high school visi- 
tor, is visiting schols in the Western 
Colorado and is attending the ses- 
sions of the Colorado Education as- 
sociation in Durango this week. 

Mr. Copeland will give an address 
before the delegates of the Colorado 
Education association on Friday af- 
ternoon. His subject will be, "The 
Ultimate Goal in Speech Educa- 
tion". 

Several of the Colorrdo college 
alumni clubs is the Western and 
southern part of the st?te have ask- 
ed Mr. Copeland to address them on 
this trip. 



Speech. 

Mrs. J. V. Paige has resumed her 
classes in Artistic Speech, in the 
Fine Arts building. She has been 
connected with the College for three 
years, and offers courses in Orel 
Interpretation of Literature, Imper- 
sonation and Dialect sketches, and 
Speech Technique. This year Mrs. 
Paige is stressing, more than ever, 
the value of being able to speak 
fluently and convincingly before an 
audience, and hopes to arouse in 
the students a finer appreciation of 
this art. 



The Colorado college quartet 
composed of Don Reid, David Bem- 
mels, Curtis Westfall, and Evert 
Boerrighter is presented over sta- 
tion KVOR every Wednesday night 
at 8:45. Their broadcasts, which 
include classical and collegiate num- 
bers, are rapidly becoming favorites 
with the radio audience. 



The opera, planned by Mrs. 
Tucker and Miss Fielding, has been 
definitely postponed because of lack 
of funds. 



A caption in "The Blue and 
White Courier" of the Fort Lupton 
high school reads, "Boys Sing at 
Church." Suppose we can get them 
at Colorado college next year? 



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THE TIGER 



Friday, October 6, 1933 



A PICTURE WITH A MORAL- 




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by name, p ease! 



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JOIN THE CRUSADE AGAINST "PRETTY PANTS' 7 

If a man wants to lead the life of an outcast 
then tricky corduroys are his dish. But if he want 
to be a campus leader, then distinctive, conserva 
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Campus Cords set the character for good style in 
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straight hang have been widely imitated — but 
seldom equalled. 

This approved corduroy trouser welcomes tough 
going, and easily survives countless cleanings or 
tubbings. 

The Campus Cords dealer generally appreciates 
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correct apparel, as well as Campus Cords.* 

* You'll like CAMPUS FLANNELS, CAMPUS 
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CAM PUS CORPS 

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Tigers Always Welcome 
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The- II. .n for Good Photography 

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Jeweler and Optometrist 

Fine Watch and Clock Repairing 

Eyes Examined — Glasses Fitted 

— Lenses Duplicated — 

Phone Main 1702-J 9 N. Tejon St. 



Frosh 

Freshman initiation was held the 
other evening at Bemis during din- 
ner. Miss Lyda Roark, chairman of 
the occasion, said, "Tonight we are 
having the traditional initiation of 
the Freshmen into Bemis dining 
room by the Sophomores. We know 
you Freshmen will all show your 
good sportsmanship by doing the 
things we ask you to do." 

Roll was called, and much to 
the joy of the Sophomores every 
Freshman was present. Miss Roark 
continued: 

"Before each act, the girl or 
girls to perform will raise their 
hands over their heads, bow, and 
say, 'Hail Mighty Sophomores, 
Hail.' The sophomores have decid- 
ed that Freshman Rothgerber be 
appointed to see that the water 
glasses in the dining room are al- 
ways filled." 

Miss Rothgerber was then ask- 
ed to stand and briefly tell the ad- 
vantages of being late to meals. She 
answered by saying that having 
been late only a few times, she was 
not adequately informed. She did 
say, however, that it was an excel- 
lent chance to show off a new derss. 
Freshman Dutton and Freshman 
Hurley entertained by giving a de- 
lightful conversation between Rey- 
nard the Fox and Brier Rabbit. 
Freshman Peck gave an impression- 
istic dance of the wind blowing thru 
the rushes. Freshman Adams and 
Freshman Cortilini entertained by 
giving a balcony scene between 
Romeo and Juliet. Freshman Chen- 
ey was asked to read Little Boy 
Blue in baby talk, with character- 
istic gestures. Freshman Buckley 
and Freshman Carney very roman- 
tically enacted a "Proposal in the 
gay '20's", while Freshman Reid 
and Freshman Dixon entertained 
with a "Proposal in 1950". Fresh- 
man Espe, Statton, and Wylie gave 
a Hulla dance. Freshman James led 
everyone in a school yell. Freshman 
Marriot flitted around the room like 
a bird singing "Let's all sing like 
the birdies sing". Freshman Bost- 
ford described her ideal man, while 
Freshman Webster and Hamptan 
impersonated cuckoos at the hour 
of twelve. Freshman Alexander told 
of the advantages of being light on 
one's feet, and Freshman Perry gave 
a dance. Freshman Hess told of the 
advantages of being coy, and Tyson 
wrestled with temptation. Freshman 
Hyatt tripped the light fantastic, 
and Anderson discussed the three 
times when a bird's bill is overdue. 
The performance ended by all the 
Freshmen and the new students 
singing "Colorado C Men". 



In the absence of Mr. Boothroyd 
the choir is being conducted by 
Mr. Frank Gillis assisted by Miss 
Leta Gale. 



Friday, October 6, 1933 



THE TIGER 



Campus Chic 

Black, they say, is the color this 
fall; so some of our best dressed 
coeds are wearing black. Sally Tom- 
kins, when she has a date with Jes- 
sie, wears a black ensemble trimmed 
in red. The dress is wool with a 
black and red plaid collar which 
buttons in a great bow in front. 
There are small black caps on the 
sleeves. She wears a big black hat, 
tiny red ear-rings, and black gloves 
and pumps. It's cute. 

Beret hats look well on only a 
few people, but Margaret Kirby 
wears a black one charmingly. Her 
black coat is enlivened by red but- 
tons. A dashing black and white 
scarf, a black dress and black slip- 
pers complete the ensemble. 



A. W. S. 

The Associated Women Students 
tea dance will be given Friday, Oct. 
13 at 3:30 o'clock. This tea is giv- 
en in honor of the freshmen wom- 
en. One of the interesting features 
of the program will be a dance giv- 
en by Miss Marianne Elser. 



The legislative board of A. W. 
S. will be the guest of Dean Faut- 
eaux at dinner Oct. 10. The regu- 
lar meeting of the board will fol- 
low. 



The first A. W. S. meeting for all 
women students will be held in Per- 
kins hall Oct. 12. There will be an 
election of a freshman woman rep- 
resentative to A. W. S. legislative 
board. An interesting program is 
also planned. 






Bemis News 

There are sixty-seven girls in 
Bemis this year. Of course Denver 
has the largest representation with 
seventeen, but Pueblo runs a close 
second with thirteen. The other Col- 
orado towns represented are, Ala- 
mosa, one; Burlington, one; Cal- 
han, one; Colorado Springs, one; 
Delta, one; Fort Collins, one; Fort 
Lupton, one; Fort Morgan, two; 
Grand Junction, three; Greeley, 
two; La Junta, two; Leadville, 
one; Monte Vista, three; Montrose 
two; Trinidad, one; Walsenburg, 
one. There are two girls from Mas- 
sachusetts, four from Illinois, one 
from Wyoming, one from Texas, 
four from New Mexico and one 
from Oklahoma. 

When each Bemis girl came out 
of her room Wednesday morning, 
she was confronted with a slogan, 
clipped from the headlines of some 
of our better known magazine ad- 
vertisements, tacked on the right 
hand side of her door. How they 
came there is p deep dark mystery. 
Some of these little signs were very 
amusing and manv of them were 
extremely pointed. Shall we be kind 
and hope that some of the girls nev- 
er catch on? 




aooi/fK_Jv 










• J^ntui / 





garettes 

vJf all the ways in which 
tobacco is used the cigarette 
the mildest form 



YOU know, ever since the Indians 
found out the pleasure of smoking 
tobacco, there have been many ways of 
enjoying it. 

But of all the ways in which tobacco 
is used, the cigarette is the mildest form. 

Another thing — cigarettes are about 
the most convenient smoke. All you 
have to do is strike a match. 

Everything that money can buy and 
everything that science knows about is 
used to make Chesterfields. 

The right home-grown tobaccos- 
seasoned *with just enough aromatic 
Turkish— are blended and cross-blended 
the Chesterfield way. 

Then the cigarettes are made right 
—firm, well-filled. Chesterfield uses the 
right kind of pure cigarette paper. 

There are other good cigarettes, of 
course, but Chesterfield is 

the cigarette that's milder, the 
cigarette that tastes better. 
Chesterfields satisfy — ive ask 
you to try them. 



esterfi 




© 1933. Liggett & Myirs Toracco Co. 



the cigarette that's MILDER 

the cigarette that TASTES BETTER 



Professor and Mrs. C. H. Sisam 
entertained at a party for the fac- 
ulty of the School of Natural sci- 
ences Wednesday night at their 
home. 



Let us design a new coiffure for 
your fall hat. 

PAUDRE PAUFFE 

BEAUTY SHOPPE 
Phone 717-J 222 N. Tejon 



Strachan's 

SWEET SHOP 

Bijou and Nevada 



THE TIGER 



Friday, October 6, 1933 



PORT 



Tiger Huddle 

by "Chris" Marlowe 
The Tigers gave the Teachers a 
course in elementary football Fri- 
day night at Greeley and in ex- 
change treked to the home grid- 
iron with a "happy go lucky" 9-7 

score dangling from their belts. 
>•• ■•- ••• 

And all this week, we have heard 
a continuous growl from the Bear 
encampment. It seems that the 
cause for argument lies with the 
decision of Vidal, an official of that 
game. Vidal is accused bv the up 
state followers of over-officiating. 
Perhaps a certain amount of over- 
officiating; did exist, but how often 
has C. C. lost heart breaking foot- 
ball Barnes bv the mere margin of a 
point and took defeat with a smile, 
onlv to return to the field of battle 
with added determination ?"d fight. 
We wonder — can the Teachers 
take it? 

And then . . . there was the 
crowd — C. C. students much in evi- 
dence. Teachers were also there — 
with an over-ripe collection of to- 
matoes which were ad vn nta«eoiisly 
used in the third period Ask Hen- 
ry Finger for particulars. 
>•• ••• *•* 

Now, that game tomorrow after- 
noon. Our team is going to need 
the full support of ev^rv "tudent if 
Cutler is to rug Let's all get out 
there ^nd push We ^on't expect to 
lose but it takes a better sport to 

support a loser. 

••■ ••• ••• 

We grab in the dark and null out 
a host of scattered nredictions for 
the Rockv Mountain conference 
and non-conference games to be 
be nlaved th's week-end. 

Utah 6, University of California 
12. 

Colorado Aggies 6, Denver Uni- 
versity 13. 

Brigham Young 10. Teachers 7. 

Western State 6, Mines 12. 

Wyoming 7. Colorado college 13. 



Pep Assembly 

Beat Wyoming! That was the 
general cry of all loval Timers at 
the pep assembly held in Perkins 
Thursday morning. The student 
body radiated lots of school spirit 
and seemed over enthused over the 
Tiger's 9-7 defeat over the Teach- 
er Bears last week. 



"C" Club 

Carl Carlson was elected presi- 
dent of the Colorado college "C" 
club Thursday. Clanton Roach was 
made vice president and Raymond 
LcMaster was elected treasurer. 

All three officers arc members of 
the 1933 Timer eleven. Carlson is 
a senior and a member of Sigma 



Tigers vs. Teachers 

The Colorado college Tigers won 
their first conference go at Greeley 
last Friday night by a close score of 
9-7. 

It was the educated toe of Steve 
Andrews, Tiger right tackle that 
cinched the game for the Bengals. 
The fourth period found the Bears 
holding the scant margin of a one- 
point lead and the chance of a Ti- 
ger come-back seemed hopeless. It 
was at this juncture of the game 
that Andrews was called back from 
the line and told to do his stuff. He 
got off a beautiful kick which drop- 
ped between the goal posts for the 
three point tally that brought the 
Timers home in triumph. 

The Ti^er team was for the most 
part of the game completely out- 
classed and outplayed by a deter- 
mined Pedagog crew but tb*» Tiger 
iinx held good and the 1933 foot- 
ball season was off to a successful 
start. 

Colorado college vs. Wyoming 

The Tiger's home football sched- 
ule will be ushered in tomorrow af- 
ternoon when the Bengals play host 
to the Wyoming cowboys. 

On paper, the two teams look 
very evenly matched, but anything 
may happen, and a great game is 
in prospect when the two teams 
d-sh tomorrow nn Washburn fie'd 
The Cowboys held the strong Aggie 
aggregation to a 7-0 score last St- 
urday and are out for Tiger meat 
this week-end. In Colorado Springs, 
the latest reports from the jungle 
are that the Tigers are planning on 
takmg the. cowboys for a ride. 

One thing is certain however, 
that with both te^ms so evenly mat- 
ched and with the game having a 
definite bearing on conference 
standing, the final score will be more 
or less decided by a scant margin 
of a few points. 



Fossil 

Prof. H. E. Mathias of the Geol- 
ogy department is preparing a fossil 
turtle for the college museum. The 
turtle measures 20 inches in length 
and 15 inches in width. The fossil 
was found last spring by Damon 
Runyon, a student here last year, 
near his home at Scotts Bluff, Neb- 
raska. 



I See By The Papers 

Picturesque Taos was the setting 
for the school of painting conduct- 
ed by the University of New Mexi- 
co from June 19 to July 29. A 
number of Taos artists gave class 
criticisms during the session. 

— New Mexico Lobo. 



George Meredith, C. C. alum- 
nus, has returned to the Univer- 
sity of Colorado, where he received 
his masters degree, to continue re- 
search in the field of cosmic rays 
and to serve as instructor in phy- 
sics During the past summer he 
has been employed by the Carne- 
gie institution at the Alpine Labo- 
ratories in Manitou. 



At a meeting held in Bemis hall 
Monday night, Kay Lingham was 
elected senior representative to A. 
W. S. Other candidates were 
Ethelda Gardner and Billie Sulli- 
van. 



Touch Football 

The interfraternity touch football 
bal'le will get under way this week- 
end when six teams will see action. 

The schedule for the week-end: 
Friday — 4:00 p. m. 

Kapna Si<»m-'> vs. Sigma Chi. 
Saturdav — 9:30 a. m. 

Be'* Theta Pi vs. Delta Alpha 
Phi. 

S-turdav — 10:45 a. m. 

Phi Gamma Delta vs. Phi Delta 
Theta. 

Players are urmed to st»rt their 
games on time in order that \he fol- 
lowing game may get started. 

Chi fraternitv Rnnch and I eM"S- 
ter belon" to Phi Gamma Delta fra- 
ternity. They are juniors. 



"You're Sure They're Pure" 

Cream Patties 
at 25c lb. 

Derngood Chocolate and 
Vanilla Genesee Cream 
Patties will be in this 
assortment of five kinds. 
A delicious feature for 
Saturday, the 7th. 



26 S. Tejon 



Dern's 



The best way to tell of the 
beauty of Colorado, Stand- 
ley's Color Pictures, Hand- 
Colored — 35 cents up. 

H.L. Standley 

PHOTOGRAPHER 

224 No. Tejon St. 

Colorado Springs 



Colorado College 

TEXT BOOKS 

AND SUPPLIES 

C. C. and Fraternity 

Stationery 

Laundry Bags — $2.00 Each 

Murray Drug Co. 

Across From the Campus 



To Maintain 
A Payroll in 
Colorado Springs 




El 

Phone Main 577 



For ALL 

Out-of-Doors 

Activities 



Leather 
Jackets 

Fine first quality leathers — 
Suede or Cowhide. Made 
with patented Zipper fronts 
— New Smart Shades. 

$795 to $1350 



Cant Bust 'Em 
Cords $0 95 

WAYMIRE 

CLOTHING CO 



Friday, October 6, 1933 



THE TIGER 



oeiAL 



Kappa Sigma 

Beta Omega of Kappa Sigma en- 
tertained at a dance last Saturday 
evening at the chapter house. The 
dance was given in honor of the 
pledges. The pledges are Tom Ross, 
George Miller, Jr., Kenneth Deppen, 
Frank Von Steeg, Norman Trainor, 
James Johnson, R. M. Price, Will- 
iam Rudor, Eddie McRea, Murray 
Lorenz, Russell van Skyke and 
George Fisher. The chaperones were 
Prof, and Mrs. Mathias and Mrs. 
O'Connell. 

The guests included, Harriet 
Kearney, Martha Kelly, Dorothy 
Kittle, Catherine McCullough, Reba 
Raney, Betty Piatt, Viola Robert- 
son, Alice Boatright, June Mary 
Chapman, Doris Shock, Catherine 
Deppen, Louise Vaden, Mabel Dav- 
ies, Mary Lovitt, Ersestine Stroup, 
Louise Kirkpatrick, Betty Trailer, 
Pauline Hoopes, Margarite Greig, 
Margaret Utterback and Virginia 

Graham. 

... .»• ••• 

Inter-Fraternity Dance 

Say, talk about a dance! The 
Interfraternity Council is throwing 
a REAL one Saturday night, Oct. 
7 at Hiawatha Gardens in Manitou. 
Just drop around any time after 
9:30. And the prices are low 
enough for anyone's pocketbook. 
Only 75 cents per couple or 40 
cents a stag and what's more John- 
ny Metzler and his Aces are going 
to furnish the music. It's rumored 
that its going to be a plenty swell 
hop so I'd suggest that all of you 
get out that old Tiger spirit and be 
there with bells on. See you Satur- 
day night, folks! 

••• ••• ••• 

College Group 

The college group of the First 
Congregational church will hold its 
first meeting of t h e year at t h e 
home of Prof, and Mrs. Gordon 
Parker, 1401 Wood avenue Sun- 
day, Oct. 1 at 7:30. All students 
enjoying discussions of personal or 
world problems are urged to at- 
tend. 

Rev. Charles S. Brown leads the 
meetings in channels of timely in- 
terest each week. The group fol- 
lows no set program and h a s no 
formal organization. It welcomes 
new members with new interests 
and problems. 



After a brief visit in Colorado 
Springs, Howard Goff has returned 
to the University of Iowa for grad- 
uate work in physics and mathe- 
matics. 



President and Mrs. C. B. Hershey 
will be at home Tuesday evening, 
Oct. 10 to the trustees and faculty 
of Colorado college. 



SOCIAL CALENDAR 

The Social Committee of A. S. 
C. C. submits the following tenta- 
tive calendar of social events as 
scheduled from applications re- 
questing dates. 

Changes and additions must be 
made through the office of the Dean 
of Women. 
Friday, Oct. 6 — 

Sigma Chi Tea Dance for Gam- 
ma Phi Beta 

Phi Gamma Delta Tea Dance 

Beta Theta Pi Pledge Dance 
Saturday, Oct. 7 — 

W. A. A. Breakfast Picnic 

Interfraternity All-College 
Friday, Oct. 13— 

A. W. S. Tea Dance 

Phi Gamma Delta Pledge Dance 

Gamma Phi Beta Pledge Dance 
Saturday, Oct. 14 — 

Delta Gamma Initiation and Ban- 
quet 

Kappa Alpha Theta Pledge Dance 

Kappa Kappa Gamma Dance 
Friday, Oct. 20— 

Delta Gamma Pledge Dance 
Saturday, Oct 21— 

Lawrence Tibbett Concert 

Sigma Chi Pledge Dance 

Delta Alpha Phi Pledge Dance 

Kappa Sigma Barn Dance 
Friday, Oct. 27— 

Sigma Chi Tea Dance 
A. W. S. Costume Ball 
Friday, Nov. 3 — 

Sigma Chi Tea Dance 
Kappa Kappa Gamma Dance 
Friday, Nov. 10 — 

Kappa Sigma Tea Dance 
Saturday, November 11 — 
Home Coming 
Friday, Nov. 17 — 

Sigma Chi Tea Dance 
Delta Alpha Phi Tea Dance 

Delta Gamma Dance 
Saturday, Nov. 18 — 

Phi Delta Theta Dance 
Friday, Nov. 24 — 

Phi Gamma Delta Dance 

Beta Theta Pi Dance 
Thursday, Nov. 30 — 

Kappa Sigma Breakfast Dance 
Friday, December 1 — 

Sigma Chi Dance 
Friday, December 8 — 

Kappa Alpha Theta Dance 

Phi Gamma Delta Dance 
Saturday, Dec. 9 — 

Delta Gamma Christmas Dance 

Gamma Ph iBeta Dance 

Lambda Chi Alpha installation 
formal. 
Friday, Dec. 15— 

Kappa Kappa Gamma Formal 

Kappa Sigma Dance 
Friday, January 12 — 

Kappa Sigma Tea dance 
Friday, January 19 — 

A. W. S. Tea Dance 
Saturday, Jan. 20 — 

Phi Delta Theta Dance 



Wagner- Fults Studio 



Official Photographer 

for 

Colorado College 



"Portraits that Please 



M 



Burns Theatre Building 



Elevator Service 



7 N 

PRESIDENTS AND DEPARTMENT HEADS OF 
THE LEADING UNrVERSlTIES RECOMMEND 

WEBSTER'S 
COLLEGIATE 




"The best American dictionary that has yet appeared 
for a college student to keep within arm's reach. What he 
does not find between its covers in relation to the general 
use of words in speech or on printed pages will not be 
necessary to a liberal arts degree." — Orion Lowe, Direc- 
tor, Winter Institute of Literature, University of Miami. 

The best abridged dictionary because it is based on the 
"Supreme Authority" — Webster's New International Dictionary. 

106,000 entries including hundreds of new words, with defini- 
tions, spellings, and correct use; a dictionary of Biography; a 
Gazetteer; rules of punctuation; use of capitals, abbreviations, 
etc.; a dictionary of foreign words and phrases. Many other 
features of practical value. 1,268 pages. 1,700 illustrations. 

See It At Tour College Bookstore or Write for Information to 
the Publishers. 

©. & C. MERRIAM CO. SPRINGFIELD. MASS. 



THE CHIEF NOW BECOMES THE 
RIGHTFUL LEADER! 

The CHIEF, again leads the way and 
offers the people of Colorado Springs the 
pick of the pictures from five of the nine 
major companies at sensational low prices. 
NOW all Colorado Springs can attend the 
leading theatre as the price is within the 
reach of all and the pictures are the best 



ANY 
SEAT 




ANY 

TIME 



Starts SATURDAY 

1933's Greatest Football Picture! 

"SATURDAY'S 

MILLIONS" 

from the Saturday Evening Post Story 

with 
Johnny Mack Brown — Robert Young 

And 1932's ALL-AMERICAN STARS 




THE TIGER 



Friday, October 6, 1933 



HOLDS WORLDS RECORD 

612 Sold in One Day 
AN ECONOMICAL NECESSITY 

STOKOL 

THE WORLD'S GREATEST STOKER 



Reduce 



COAL BILLS 20% to 50% 
OIL BILLS - 40% to 75% 
GAS BILLS - 50% to 80% 



FOR INFORMATION PHONE OR CALL AT 

Bum stead's 



Phone M. 597 



414 E. Dale 



iOIIIIIII illlllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllillllllilllillllllllTI 



)ee 



tf\ct> 



POT — 
SPIGOT 

No Cover Charge 



IIIIIIIIIIIIIWIIIHIIIIIIHlKliU 



Howard's 

| Q_/9 Barber 
■ Shop 

19 East Bijou Street 



IMIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIilltl Ill II I II 



Watch inspectors for C. R. I. & P. Ry. 
and U. P. Ry. 

C.B.LAUTERMAN 

JEWELER and OPTOMETRIST 

FINE 

WATCH — CLOCK 

AND JEWELRY 

REPAIRING 

40 years at 121 North Tejon St. 
Colorado Springs 

lllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll 




MEET ME 

AT 

McRae's 

RESTAURANT 



105 
Pikes Peak 



Phone 
M. 5300 



;ittittmi{ i i{ i t iiiiiiiiti »mn ii i i n ii nntt 






:-!i!Sllllllliiiiliillilli!ISllliilliiiiil 






illlllllliiiiiiiiiiiii 



COLORADO COLLEGE 




Palmer Hall entrance 



"IN STEP WITH THE MARCH OF TIME" 

Since 1874 outstanding among the 
highest ranking colleges of the 
country for its close super- 
vision of students, thor- 
oughness of training, and 

healthful location, 
COLORADO COLLEGE 
again steps for- 
ward in the a- 

doption of 
a New PLAN 

permitting 
greater freedom 
in choice of sub- 
jects under expert 
guidance to insure the 
best procedure in fields 
of concentration. A LIBERAL 
ARTS COLLEGE, C. C. offers com- 
plete foundational courses for 
advanced study. For catalog write 



tt r —mi.-- H ^M 



Palmer Hall portico 



William D. Copeland, Secretary, 

Colorado College, 

Colorado Springs, Colorado. 



C. B. HERSHEY, A. M., ED. D., Acting President 




One of the regional 
scenic gems which clas- 
sify the COLORADO 
COLLEGE Campus 
background as one of 
the most beautiful in 
the United States. 



THE TIGER 



Friday, October 13, 1933 



Pack Bags 
Laundry Bags 
Hikers Supplies 

THE OUTWEST 

TENT and AWNING CO. 



M. 1261 



18 E. Kiowa 



W. I.LUCAS 

— HAS— 

EVERYTHING IN SPORTINC 
GOODS— 

"Tigers Always Welcome" 

120 North Tejon Street 
Main 900 






Couture's 

FRENCH CLEANING & 
DYEING CO. 



We Solicit Your Patronage 



218 N. Tejon St. 

Colorado Springs, Colo. 

Phone Main 1288 



■]• lllllllllllll Illllllll 1 1 1 1 J 1 1 J 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 J 1 1 1 1 1 1 J 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 II Ml nil I II I !,{, 



Say Boys 






Campbell's 
Barber 
Shop 



109 East Pikes Peak Ave. 



>iniiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiii[:iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiI]I!IIIIIIIIiiiiii|[IIIIIIIIIIIIII<| 



»»»n» i > i M»»n»»»n » »» » »»» » M t 



A Typwriter 

— an Aid to Education 

The investment is small — 
payment as low as $4.00 a 
month may be made — and we 
carry every make machine. 



The 

Typewriter 

Man 



125 N. Tejon St. 
Phone Main 95 




Do you remember 



... all of the claims that have been made 
about smoking tobacco — how it was that 
one was this and that one was that? 

After all, what you want to know 
when you get a thing for a certain pur- 
pose is . . . 

fr Was it made for tliat?" 
Granger is made of White Burley — 

the kind of leaf tobacco that's best for 

pipes. 

And old man Wellman, who taught 

us how to make Granger, knew how. 

Granger is made to 
smoke in a pipe — and 
folks seem to like it. 



a sensible package 
10 cents 





ranger Rough Cut 

_the tobacco that's MADE FOR PIPES 



191?. Liggett & Myers Tobacco Co. 



eiitfWF i> cnM Wit l" Wfif " tars 

|j ijtlJur r Ql kjUll Only one Quality and the 



SUPERIOR FORD SERVICE 
827 N. Tejon M. 1317 



ttimmmnnntmtnmmmmmimtm 



Price is uniform 

H. A. Thompson 
Main 1-8-1-1 10 E. Kiowa 



|pOI>I>EGE9 

^ "INN" 

ACROSS FROM MURRAY'S 



Iuticd each week during th» academic year. Entered at the 'ogt Office at Colorado Spring! aa Second-Claai Matter. 



VOLUME XXXVI 



THE TIGER 



COLORADO COLLEGE WEEKLY NEWS-MAGAZINE 



Number 4 



# e A M P u 



♦ Elections 

Editors 

Heads of v the two COLORADO 
COLLEGE publications, the COLO- 
RADO COLLEGE TIGER and the 
PIKES PEAK NUGGET were elect- 
ed Wednesday at a meeting of the 
publications board. The appoint- 
ments were necessary due to t h e 
TIGER editor vacancy caused by 
the failure of Dave Scott, appoint- 
ed last spring, to return to school. 




EMMA LOUISE JORDAN 

Activities - - 

Miss Emma Louise Jordan, jun- 
ior in the school of literature, was 
given the job as year-book editor. 
She has been active in the publi- 
cations for the past two years. She 
is a member of Kappa Gamma, Tig- 
er Club, A. W. S. board, Koshare, 




LEW CROSBY 

Ye Olde Ed. 

and has held various class offices. 
Lew Crosby, junior enrolled in 
the school of fine arts was elected 
editor of THE TIGER. Crosby is 
a member of Phi Delta Theta fra- 
ternity, and Koshare, the college 
drmatic organization. He has been 
active on the staff of THE TIGER 
since he entered COLORADO 
COLLEGE, a transfer from Okla- 
homa A. & M. 



"Speed" 

Marion Deutsch, former Tiger 
football star and voted most out- 
standing man in the 1933 senior 
class, has entered the technical di- 
vision of the Boeing School of 
Aeronautics in California. He 
plans to specialize in the radio 
communication field of aeronautics. 

Deutsch, Red Lanterner, "C" 
Club, Sigma Delta Psi, majored in 
physics while in COLORADO COL- 
LEGE. 



Silver Glade 

Long recognized as a center for 
COLORADO COLLEGE gatherings 
in Denver, the Silver Glade in the 
Cosmopolitan hotel holds its grand 
opening Oct. 13, 14, 15. 

Carol Lofner and his 1 5-piece 
orchestra will appear at the Silver 
Glade during the 1933-34 season. 
He has played engagements at the 
St. Francis hotel in San Francisco, 
the Grand hotel, Santa Monica, and 
the nationally known Bal Tabarin 
in San Francisco. 



After College— What? 

This will be the theme for the 
women of the college for next 
week, especially the new women, 
for Miss Bessie East, the Vocation- 
pi Counsellor, will be at Bemis Hall 
from the morning of Monday, Oc- 
tober 16, until Friday afternoon. 
She will be holding the individual 
conferences with new women for 
the discussion of their plans for 
the future. Any woman in college 
who desires an appointment with 
Miss East may arrange for a time 
through the office of the Dean of 
Women. Main 727. 

The Collegiate Bureau of Occu- 
n?tions in Denver, of which Miss 
East is director, has been conduct- 
ing an occupational survey of the 
women srr?duates of COLORADO 

COT LEGE f rom 1928 through 
1932, which has great value in 
showing present undergraduates the 
experiences of former students and 
in aiding them to plan their courses 
more profitably. Replies received 
in this study, which will be pub- 
lished later, show the value of the 
vocation?] counseling program in 
giving a knowledge of occupations, 
the opportunities open and the 
preparation needed. 

As a preliminary to this week of 
conferences. Mrs. Fauteaux is giv- 
ing a tea at Bemis Hall on Monday, 
Oct. 16 at four o'clock for Miss 
East and Mrs. Blanche E. Hyde, ?n 
authority in the field of home eco- 
nomics and a writer for magazines 
on tonics connected with the home. 
Miss East will talk on "How to get 
» Job" and Mrs. Hyde on "Home 
Making as a Career." Guest' will 
be all new women of the college, 
women on the facult", advisers to 
sororities, officers of the Associrfpd 
Women Students. Assisting the 
hostess will be members of the Vo- 
cational Guidance Commitfee of A. 
W. S., Alice Sutton, chairman: 
Catherine Corning. Lois Mav Lear, 
Virginia Botsford and Victoria 
Kneip. i 



Japanese People 

and their message were presented 
to the people of Colorado Springs 
Sunday when Dr. William Merrell 
Vories, an alumnus of COLORADO 
COLLEGE, who has lived in Japan 
the past 25 years was the principal 
speaker. Dr. Vories believes that the 
United States and the League of 
Nations have placed too much 
blame on Japan and are asking too 
much of her after her recent troub- 
le with China. 

Writer, musician, architect, busi- 
ness man, missionary Vories has re- 
cently published a book entitled, 
"Goro Takagi — Musician". He has 
planned and constructed over a 
thousand buildings in Japan. He 
plays both the piano and organ and 
has written several hymns. He 
heads the Omi mission and has en- 
tered the life of Japan thru many 
other channels. He is an emminent 
speaker. 

Monday Dr. Vories addressed the 
student body. He took as his topic 
two inscriptions found on the build- 
ings of COLORADO COLLEGE and 
interpreted them as "You shall 
know the truth about your neigh- 
bors" and "The things you see 
about your neighbors are temporal, 
the things unseen are eternal". The 
sermon was short and to the point. 
The illustrations filled and illumi- 
nated the text. 

The point of view a person takes 
is often a big factor. The Japanese 
eat raw fish, the Americans eat raw 
oysters. Both look askance at the 
other. Dr. Vories admitted he ate 
and liked both. In Japan there are 
no bread lines. The family system 
takes care of all those who might 
otherwise be in the bread lines. Ev- 
en a thirty-first cousin would be 
taken care of while there was any- 
thing to eat. In America it is the in- 
dividual. Instead of expecting tips, 
the Japanese hotel gives the depart- 
ing guest a gift. 



Active Profs. 

The Colorado and Wyoming 
Academy of Science will hold its 
1933 meeting in Laramie Wyo., 
Dec. 1 and 2. 

Dr. R. J. Gilmore, COLORADO 
COLLEGE is secretary of the acad- 
emy and Prof. F. W. Douglas is 
chairman of the chemistry section. 
R. E. Landon of Fairplay, Colo., 
who was associated with COLO- 
RADO COLLEGE last year, is chair- 
man of the geology and geography 
section. 



♦ Brains 

The Highest Average 

on the campus has an intrinsic 
as well as a scholastic reward this 
year as far as Kappa Kappa Gam- 
ma is concerned. Saturday, Miss 
Leonna Dorlac represented the so- 
rority at a luncheon of the Wom- 
an's Panhellenic Association in 
Denver and received a 16-inch sil- 
ver-embossed bronze trophy on be- 
half of the local Kappa Chapter 
for having the highest scholastic 
average on the COLORADO COL- 
LEGE campus for the year 1932- 
33. 




LEONNA DORLAC 

"Three Straight Years - - 
Miss Dorlac characterized the 
situation tersely with "This is just 
the first of three straight years." 
Three years winning of the cup 
means permanent possession. 

A similar trophy is given the so- 
rority chapter having the highest 
average for the proceeding year at 
Denver University, Colorado Uni- 
versity and Colorado Agricultural 
College. This is the first year the 
cup has been awarded on the 
COLORADO COLLEGE campus. 
Kappa's winning average for the 
year was 82.29. 



Fish Bait 

that does not exist in Colorado 
waters was recently banned by the 
State Fish and Game commission 
but Dr. R. J. Gilmore of the biology 
department of COLORADO COL- 
LEGE soon pointed out the error. 

The commission used the name 
corydahs cornutus in defining the 
species of hellgrammite which is 
used as fish bait. Dr. Gilmore states 
that this type does not exist in this 
state and that the correct name 
should be pteronarcys californicus. 



Bert Vandervliet is attending the 
School of Public Administration at 
the University of Cincinnati, Cin- 
cinnati, Ohio. 



THE TIGER 



Friday, October 13, 1933 



THE TIGER 




Editor LEW CROSBY 

Business Manager .. Everett Stapleton Big Time Musicale 

Radio, Stage, Metropolitan op 



♦ Inference f 

peddled by the Pick Handle Pictorial up at Golden as to the prob- 



CHAPEL CALENDAR Appropriation Cuts 

Tuesday, Oct. 17^10:00 a. m. Due to the smaller amount al- 
CHAPEL SERVICE. Speaker: loted to the Budget committee of 
Dean McMurtry. the Student Council this year, a- 

Wednesday, Oct. 18, 3.15 p. m. | propriations for student organiza- 
ORGAN RECITAL. Dr. Frederick tions will necessarily be smaller 
Boothroyd. this year. The committee made out 

the budget without bias and cuts 
were made with every possible at- 
tention and interest to the appro- 
straight from Broadway to pri ations concerned. 

The council agreed that the bud- 
get be adopted and approved by 



Colorado Springs — is this operatic 
dish to be offered to music lovers 



able "panning" of the NRA act by "every other college paper in the ' ™ . tms \ e % l0n - Ihe magnificent I them provided the student enro „. 



country" is not to be taken too seriously by serious minded or discrim 
inating readers. Sensation-addled hunt-and-peckers sometimes forget to 
qualify their muddlings in their zeal to inject verve into reading matter. 
In fact, a short editorial is time wasted giving notice to such gibberish. 
•^ Criticism 

which is sure to follow the cut in appropriations this year is both 
untimely and thoughtless. COLORADO COLLEGE is but doing this year 
what most schools did two and three years ago. Activities are necessary, 
indeed they are vital to the welfare of this or any other educational in- 
stitution. But when other college appropriations must be cut, activities 
should follow in their turn. 

And to you who profess to know much and say more, the commit- 
tee in charge of the budget had a gigantic task cut out for them in deal- 
ing fairly with each item in the budget. They had so much money to j bejt opening on Oct. 21 : the Hall 
spend and divided it proportionally as best they could. We need co- I l? hnso " n ^ ro , choir , fo1 \ owm % on 
operation more at this period of COLORADO COLLEGE growth than ! Nov 
at any time in the past few years. Here's a chance to be a sore-heod or 
to show "we can take 'em." A choice that shouldn't have to be offered 
to any LOYAL TIGER. 



baritone, Lawrence Tibbet, and the j __„,. l ij „ 

r , n> i i o i i i ment held up in this and in the rol- 

ramed tenor, Kichard Lrooks, both i_ •„_ „„„,„„! r *i 

lowing semester. Lonsequently or- 
ganizations will not receive their 



from the Metropolitan opera, 
"Green Pastures", Hall Johnson, 
negro choir, Vladmir Horowitz, in- 
ternationally honored pianist, and 
then the queen of the castinets, 
Mme. Carola Goya in her vivid in- 
terpolations of dazzling Spanish 
dances. 

The city auditorium is to be the 
scene of the presentation of the) Tiger Manager - 
concert series with Lawrence Tib- I Tinker Editor - - 



total appropriation until the figures 
for second semester enrollment are 
tabulated. 

The budget follows: 

Budget for 1933-1934 As Accept- 
ed by the Stundent Council of 
COLORADO COLLEGE 

- - $700.00 

- - 250.00 



ance on Jan. 17. after which comes 



Debating 250.00 

Nugget Editor (Salary) - 1 50.00 

Band 225.00 

Koshare 200.00 



Ime. Goya on Feb. 1 , and on Mar. , A. W. S. 
6, Horowitz brings the series to a Enthusiasm 



215.00 
50.00 



KEYHOLE KEEPER. have on, y heard of the National 

I and the American this Epworth 



grand finale. This year's concert Social -----__ 110.00 
eries is under the management of Graduate Manager - - - 150.00 



Resuming the old key-hole keep- j League takes the dip like Minnie j . 

* f. ii,) l\ c *. l 1 ■ 1 *l * I S3.ICS. 



Messrs Slack and Oberfelder. lack 
! Kintz is in charge of the ticket 



ing after all these months seems 
like old times before the N. R. A. 
and everything — doesn't it seem 

like years ago and I feel that if 

I had conscientiously kept in con- 
dition I would have been just full 
and running over with gore — 
that's what everybody craves, the 
good old dirst — but I have allowed 
myself to get run down and flabby 
so what little snatches did get dur- 
ing an uneventful summer have 
just sort of oozed out and melted 
away (don't take me wrong, bud- 
die). 

••• ••. ••• 

With so many of the really shin- 
ing lights of the campus discharged 
via graduation and other less con- 
ventional ways, the old place this 



Switchbingle wearing last summer's ' 
straw cady at South Elbowbend's 
(Kans.) mid-Jaunary ball. This 
place is really about as exciting as 
a couple of freshly caught clams 
holding hands during mating sea- 
son in Bill the Butcher's. 

(These last quips were swiped 
from a fraternity brother's letter — 

you see how low some people sink). 
••• ••• ••■ 

Tip to freshmen: When you get 
yourself noticed in this column 
consider yourself in the dough — 
it's swell publicity. 

Betty Blue is back in town for a 
month. . . . just visiting . 



Office ExDense - - - - 25.00 
Nuggett Manager ($4.25 

per Stud't) - - - - 2018.75 
475 students each semester 
General and Miscl. - - 50.00 
Homecoming Parade and 

Prizes 35.00 



Prexy Travels. 

Pres. C. B. Hershey will go to 
Canon City Tuesday, Oct. 1 7, to de- 
liver an address to the University ; elections 25.00 

club, a group of Canon business 
men who are interested in the wel- 
fare of today's youth. Dr. Hershev's 
subject for his talk will be "The 



Youth in Modern Germany." 

Sundav afternoon Dr. Hershey 
will SDeak at the Fountain Valley 
school at an informal meeting. 



$4503.75 



The Geology department reports 
this | having nine students in the mineral 
quotation from a local lumber class, the largest number since 1977. 
company's ad must suggest some- ; This class is being tau°hr bv Rich- 
thing or other to certain minds: ard Ragle. The first field trip was 



Total Budget - 
Total Received 

from College - - - 4573.71 

Surplus 69.96 

Respectfullv submitted. 

JO E. IRISH, 
LOTS deHOLCZER. 
DON GLIDDEN 
MARTHA KELLY. 



years seems to be minus some 
that fire. It's funny how freshmen 
come to college, carve out a niche 
for themselves in the wall of cam- 
pus life, definitely establish reputa- 
tions by the time they're juniors, 
and then when thev are seniors and 
graduated, the little niches are left , up . 
empty and we notice the blank 



of "We make Fraternity Paddles" . . made up the Corlev Mountam Literature, which will devote most 



New English Courses. 

Two courses in Masterpieces of 



. . the Delta Gammas sort of Highway last week. A nnmbf"- of 
swined the Kappas' stuff on the minerals were collected and will be 
pledges this year .... girls, that j determined. Another trip is planned 
dark handsome man standing soon to the Jim Mines near Alori- 
around is Lamazure, Sigma Nu son. 
from Virginia, so just buzz n«ht j ~ 

... we all imagine Proffv Ma- < nlaying pro football with Staten Is- 

: must feel terribly inefficient land. N. Y iust a word about 

the wail left" staring us in without his little bikey-wikev .... nur ^m* with Wyotnine: The st- 
and the dav Amanda Ellis was dent body made almost as much 
honored by being chosen as the ! noise as a bunch of deaf mutes 



the face. "Ah, those four short 
fleeting years" that chapel speak- 
ers love to linger on! 

Is the very young upcoming gen- 
eration already getting blase in 
high school or what? Whatever it j let . 

is this year's freshmen are about ; at Brown this year . ^ m H n)| »h e nni«e— so ron 

as devilish as a recently graduated | is at Missouri taking up Journalism c ; der ;, w ,i lc simnovt ,h at was given 
class from the Epworth League and (poor J.) . . . . Helen Goodsell is ^ team ^„ olir hniste'ons students 
as 95% of the guys around Here | at D. U. and the great Marty is | t h e gan g did mighty fine. 



of the year to Stevenson,, Shakes- 
peare, Browning and Milton, will be 
introduced in the English depart- 
ment by Prof. A. H. Daehler. 

The course is primarily for fresh- 
men and will run parallel to the 
regular survey of literature. 



Aspiring young members of t h e 
C. C. Chapel Choir have signed up | 
for participation in "The First Wal- 



best dressed woman facultv mem- throwing bi«! wads of cotton at one 

ber. she was caught wearing a ' another and during the game Tom. | purgis", an opera by Felix Men- 
tricky little thing in pink and scar- the allev cat. walked across the un- j delssohn, which will be presented 
Webb-Chapman are both per Dart of the stands and whole in the later part of November. Dr. 
** ■ r a section turned around to see who Boothroyd, director is on a trip m 
11 * L - - -~"- east and in his absence, Mr. Frank 

Gillis, who is at the present time 
directing the Chapel Choir, is in 
charge of the rehearsals. 



Friday, October 13, 1933 



THE TIGER 



The Social Calendar 
Friday, Oct. 13. 

A. W. S. tea dance. 

Rhi Gamma Delta pledge dance. 

Gamma Phi Beta pledge dance. 
Saturday, Oct. 14. 

Woman's Educational society 
luncheon. 

Delta Gamma initiation and ban- 
quet. 
Monday, Oct. 16. 

Mrs. Fauteaux's tea for new 
women. 
Friday, Oct. 20. 

Delta Gamma pledge dance. 

Delta Alpha Phi pledge dance. 
Saturday, Oct. 21. 

Lawrence Tibbett concert. 

Sigma Chi pledge dance. 

Kappa Sigma Barn dance. 

Kappa Sigma barn dance. 



Tea for two 

fraternities on Friday afternoon, 
Oct. 6, was the occasion for the tea 
dances given at the Phi Gamma 
Delta and Sigma Chi chapter hous- 
es. 

The fijis and their guests danced 
to the strains of Johnny Metzler's 
orchestra from 4:00 to 6:00. 

The Sigs entertained in honor of 
the Gamma Phi Beta chapter to the 
tunes of Johnny Day's syncopations. 



Theta Kites 

The Theta Lodfe was the scene 
of secret rites on Friday afternoon, 
Oct. 6, when the following initiates 
became the proud wearers of the 
black ?nd gold kite: The Misses 
Ruth Bradley, Elizabeth Evans, 
Marybelle Poer, Katherine Ragle, 
Margaret Utterback, LaRue Wiley, 
and two contemporary alumnae 
from Denver, Miss Blanche Cald- 
well and Mrs. E. S. Cass. 

Following the initiation ceremony 
a banquet was held at the Briar- 
hurst Inn in honor of the new in- 
itiates, each of whom found a cor- 
sage of rose buds at her place. 

Black Ribbons 

under Kappa Kevs signify the 
death of the Grand President of 
Kappa Kappa Gamma, Mrs. H. C. 
Barney. She passed away after a 
very brief illness at her home in 
Minneapolis, Minn. Mrs. Barney was 
present in Colorado Springs for the 
installation of the local K^Dpa Kap- 
pa Gamma chapter in November, 
1932. She also visited the city a 
few months before her death with 
the other members of the Grand 
Council, at the time of the biennial 
Council meeting. 

A period of mourning has been 
declared by the national fraternity 
to terminate on November 3. Dur- 
ing this time all unnecessary enter- 
tainment will be dispensed with by 
all the Kappa chapters in the coun- 
try. For this reason the Kappa Sub- 
scription dance which was scheduled 
for Oct. 14 will be postponed until 
a later date to be announced. 



me 



somemm. 




tg. 



what makes a 
cigarette taste better 

WHAT makes anything taste bet- 
ter? It's what is in it that makes 
a thing taste better. 

CHESTERFIELDS taste better because 
we buy ripe tobaccos. These ripe to- 
baccos are aged two and a half years 
— thirty months. During this time the 
tobaccos improve — just like wine im- 
proves by ageing. 

CHESTERFIELDS taste better because 
they have the right kind of home- 
grown tobaccos and Turkish Tobac- 
cos "welded together." 




© 1933, Liggett & Myers Tobacco Co 



the cigarette that's MILDER 

the cigarette that TASTES BETTER 



THE GOLDEN CYCLE 
SHINE PARLOR 

WE DO SUPERIOR WORK 

FOR THE SAME PRICE 

GOLDEN CYCLE BUILDING 

HATS CLEANED AND BLOCKED 

TODD COLBERT. Prop. 



* PHOTOGRAPHS 

The Gift that only you can give 
Official Photographer, C. C. Nugget 



30 



PAYTON 

S. Tejon 



STUDIO 

Phone M. 477-J 



Stretchout's 

SWEET SHOP 

Bijou and Nevada 



THE TIGER 



Friday, October 13, 1933 



Let us design a new coiffure for 
your fall hat. 

PAUDRE PAUFFE 

BEAUTY SHOPPE 
Phone 717-J 222 N. Tejon 



Same quality work — 
a real Hair cut for 

PETE'S BARBER SHOP 

8 E. Cucharras 



NOTICE 
Don't forget the Associated Wom- 
men's Tea held in Bemis Commons 
Friday afternoon, Oct 13, at three- 
thirty o'clock. Music will be fur- 
nished by John Day. One of t h e 
most interesting features of the 
program will be a dance given by 
Marianne Elser and John Love. 



PORT 



Tiresfonei 

ONE STOP 
SERVICE 



OFFICIAL 

COLORADO 

BRAKE AND LIGHT 

CERTIFICATES 



STATE APPROVED 
REFLECTORS 



FREE INSPECTION 



Washing — Greasing 

Motor Oils — Tires 

Batteries 

Texaco Gasoline 

Tu**fao« Tires 

115-121 N. Nevada 
Phone M. 202 



*-. 



There will be a meeting of the 
Tiger Staff at 3:30 Tuesday in the 
Pit, Palmer hall. The entire edi- 
torial staff is expected to be pres- 
ent unless excused by the editor or 
because of classes or work. This is 
the last call for all who desire to 
work on the paper and have not 
yet turned in their names. 

"You're Sure They're Pure" 

Pecan Penouchi 
for 25c lb. 

Made with brown sugar 
and sweet cream — and 
with pecan meats — this is 
a most delightful feature. 
Be sure of enjoying it by 
getting some early on 
Saturday, the 1 4tru 



26 S. Tejon 



Bern's 



IRA C. DUGAN 

Jeweler and Optometrist 

Fine Watch and Clock Repairing 

Eyes Examined — Glasses Fitted 

— Lenses Duplicated — 



— 4» Phone Main 1702-J 



9 N. Tejon St. 



C^O£ 



/rOM/IWAIL 



niLLi/Kny 



1 to/r »Ue/ took. Ave 
(OiOlAkO SUlbtCS (OLOUViO 



Strikingly 
Different 



are the New Blouses for 
afternoon and evening wear 



Convincinqlestimona 

** That ** 

WEBSTER'S 
COLLEGIATE 

Is the Best 
Abridged Dictionary 

"\ can hardly believe I shall ever apply to It any 
test It will not creditably sustain. It Is an amazing 
product of accurato and usable scholarship,' said 
H. L. Seaver, Massachusetts Institute ot Technology. 

Piesl'i nti and l) partm ' leading Unlver- 

, 0| Inlon. Websl I Mate Is 

i r| 'y' — 

106.000 en- 

I new words, with drllnltlnns. 

of Biography: 

Qui Mr i punctuation: ii it ol capitals, abbre- 

dletlonary ot foreign words nn.l phrases. Many other fca- 

sagu. 1,700 II. i|. 'rations. 

n t.'Mioruhllshcrs. 



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G. & C. MERRIAM CO. 



SPRINGFIELD. MASS. 



Nothing-To-Nothing 

Victory was twice snatched from 
the Wyoming Cowboys last Satur- 
day afternoon at Washburn Feld 
when a stubborn Tiger defense 
functioned as the occasion called. 
The two times that Wyoming was 
on the COLORADO COLLEGE five- 
yard line were the only serious scor- 
ing threats made during the entire 
game by either club. The visitors 
were held for downs on one occa- 
sion and an alert Tiger end muffed 
the plainesman's other chance by 
by recovering a fumble when a 
Cowboy touchdown seemed certain. 
As a result of this more or less de- 
fensive game the struggle ended in 
a scoreless tie. 

These two teams have met nine 
times in the past twelve years and 
up to Saturday the Wyoming boys 
never as much as hoped for a win, 
but were much more fortunate Sat- 
urday due to the Tiger's failure to 
function on offense. COLORADO 
COI LEGE sorrowfully missed two 
j of t^eir regulars with the absence 
of Claron Swan and Carl Zeiger 
who were held out due to injuries 
received in the Teacher's game the 
preceding week. 

Intramural Basketball Schedule 
Tuesday, Oct. 17 

Phi Gamma Delta vs. Indepen- 
dents. 
Beta Theta Pi vs. Sigma Chi. 
Thursday, Oct. 19 

Phi Delta Theta vs. Delta Alpha 

Phi 
Kaopa Sigma vs. Phi Gamma 
Delta. 
Tuesdav, Oct. 24 

Phi Delta Theta vs. Independents 
Sigma Chi vs. Kappa Sigma 
Thursday, Oct. 26 

Phi Gamma Delta vs. Delta Alpha 

Phi 
Beta Theta Pi vs. Phi Delta Theta 
Tuesday, Oct. 31 

Sigma Chi vs. Delta Alnha Phi 
Ph> Gnmma Delta vs. Beta Theta 
Pi. 
Thursday, Nov. 2 

Kapna Si^ma vs. Independents 
Phi Delta Theta vs. Sigma Chi 
Tu«»sdav, Nov. 7 

Sigma Chi vs. Independents 
Phi Gamma Delta vs. Phi Delta 
Theta. 
Thursday. Nov. 9 

Delta Alnha Phi vs. Indenendents 
Kanna Sisrma vs. Beta Theta Pi 
Tuesday. Nov. 14 

Bet-' Theta Pi vs. Delta Alpha 

Phi 
Phi Delta Theta vs. Kappa Sig- 
ma. 
Th'irsdav. Nov. 16 

Rela Theta Pi vs. Independents 
Delta Alpha Phi vs. Kappa Sig- 
ma. 



Tiger Huddle 

"Chris" Marlowe 

Perhaps our fair college should 
go in for touch-football. Methinks 
more thrills were witnessed at the 
interfratemity games played last 
week than were viewed on Wash- 
burn greensward Saturday when 
two highly demoralized varsity ag- 
gregations displayed their wares 
which ended up with a 0-0 tie. The 
referees had a busy afternoon step- 
ping off some 120 yards in penalties. 
Methinks the officials should have 
received a bonus. 

*■ ••• ••• 

Who's afraid of the big, bad 
wolf? We wonder? The Utes in 
their Rocky Mountain gridiron com- 
petition have had very little trouble 
in downing their foes the past five 
years. C. U., Denver, Mines, and 
even C. C. have time after time 
taken severe beatings at the hand 
of the Utes. But — when the Utes 
left their realm of supremacy last 
week and traveled to California for 
a game with the strong U. C. L. A. 
team; the final score was somewhat 
different and the Utes are now hold- 
ing the bag. 

••• «•» ••• 

Not a few people were elated up- 
on hearing the news of Dutch 
Clark's initial win at the Oredigger 
encampment last week. The Clarks- 
men, in their game with Western 
State came out on the long end of 
a 19-13 score. And may we — 
COLORADO COLLEGE wish him 
continued success at his new post as 
head coach at Colorado School of 
Mines. 



It is rumored that members of 
the band are planning on going na- 
tive Homecoming — and have al- 
ready removed the moth balls from 
their track suits to enter the Cross^i 
country run. Methinks it is a goo/ 
idea. Long winded tooters are cap- 
able of holding their own in such 
an event. Traditionally, the cross- 
country is run on Homecoming and 
this year it is to be held between 
halves of the C. C. Brigham Young 
game. 

After all, there is nothing like 
possessing a sense of patriotism for 
dear "ol whose it". Last week we 
predicted a 6 point margin for C. C. 
over Wyoming. Consequently, the 
"Lucky Tigers" were fortunate to 
emerge from the field of battle with 
a no game verdict. D. U. and Ag- 
gies also played a 0-0 tie — hence 
our percentage last week — 800^. 
Who can tell — we might hit the 
score on the nose someday. This 
week : 

Utah Aggies-6 Denver U-13 
Mines-0. Colorado U.-13 
Montana State-0 Wyoming-9 
Brigham Young-0 Utah-36 



Friday, October 13, 1933 



THE TIGER 



Colorado College 

TEXT BOOKS 

AND SUPPLIES 

C. C. and Fraternity 

Stationery 

Laundry Bags — $2.00 Each 

Murray Drug Co. 

Across From the Campus 



To Maintain 
A Payroll in 
Colorado Springs 




[1E¥3EW 
COAL/ 

Phone Main 577 



Starts SATURDAY Oct 14 



The book that 
fired a nation's 
heart .... is 
burning up the 
screen I 




IRENE DUNNE 
WALTER HUSTON 

with 
EDNA MAY OLIVER 

Conrad Naoel • Bruce Cabot 



— On the stage — 

THE TEXAS 
YODELING 
COWBOYS 

Radio and Recording Artists 



ANY 
SEAT 



25c 



ANY 
TIME 




Interfraternity Touchball 

Interfraternity touchball started 
out the year of intramural sports 
Saturday morning when the Betas 
eked out a 3 to victory over the 
Delta Alphs with Stanley Reid boot- 
ing a field goal in the second extra 
period of play. The Phi Delts easily 
won the second game played last 
week by defeating the Phi Gams 
19-0. 



Yearlings 

Freshmen prospects were some- 
what shattered Monday when two 
experienced underclassmen were in- 
jured and will undoubtedly see lit- 
tle action this season. Kenneth Dep- 
pin, a guard from St. Johs's mili- 
tary School of Salina, Kansas, and 
Carl Swartz, star from Centennial 
high school team both suffered 
shoulder fractures in the past week. 

Despite these troubles frosh 
coaches are impressed by the en- 
thusiasm being manifested by the 
yearlings. Haines, a tackle from 
South Denver high, and Withers 
Cool, flash of the 1933 Terror team 
along with Jim Riley all look good 
on the line. Tom Mclntyre, all-state 
man from Fort Collins and Jim Mc- 
lntyre, a Colorado Springs product 
are holding down the wing positions. 
Dck Alderson, regular center, is in- 
eligible and as yet no man has been 
found for his position. Other line- 
men showing up well in practice in- 
clude Corning, Armstrong, Lester, 
Gross and Perryman, who has start- 
ed practice only recently. 

In the freshman backfield we 
find Von Steeg of Alamosa, Train- 
or of St. Mary's Myers of Flint, 
Michigan, and Walsh, Roberts and 
Stan Reid all of Colorado Springs 
available for action. The first year 
men play two games this year, at 
Denver Oct. 27, and with Mines at 
Washburn on Turkey day. 



New Mexico State Normal 

"Stu" Clark, well known in the 
Rocky Mountain conference will 
drive his troop of Cowboys all over 
Washburn field next Friday after- 
noon in an attempt to down the 
"Lucky Tiger". To date the Nor- 
mal boys have lost their only game 
by a score of 14-4. This game was 
played with the strong New Mexi- 
co Aggies. 

"Stu" is a former D. U. coach 
and also filled coaching positions 
at Wyoming and Western State. He 
is a brother of "Potsy" Clark, men- 
tor of the Portsmouth Spartan pro- 
fessional team with which "Dutch" 
Clark formerly played. 



Alumni Notes 

William N. Baker is a medical 

student at Northwestern university. 
••* ••• ••• 

Janet Fisher is a student at Sim- 
mons college. 



Edgar Gregory is attending the 
Chicago Theological seminary. 



CANDIES AND NUTS 
FOR ALL OCCASIONS 

HUGHES 
CANDY SHOP 

128 N. TEJON 




For your Convenience 




QYitk 

CAROL 

and his rapturous West Coast 
Dance Orchestra . . . and 

BAVID and HILDA MURRAY 

distinguished dance team whose engagements at the 
most noted Night Clubs, both here and abroad, have 
made them internationally famous ... Hilda Murray- 
is dressed exclusively by W®Vtll ©f P«tl°i$ 

A MORE BEAUTIFUL, more gorgeously decorated 
flk Silver Glade will be presented next Friday, Sat- 
XTLurday and Sunday . . . and what pleasures are in 
store for you these gala opening nights. There's a brand 
new star on Denver's amusement horizon . . . Hail to 
Carol Lofner, the West Coast's most scintillating 
music-master! He's all set to do his brightest shining, 
his gayest "moanin' low" for you at the Silver Glade 
Grand Opening! 

It's going to be the biggest attraction of the season 
. . . Everybody who's anybody will be there! Come 
dance with inspired, happy feet and a gay, glad heart 
to the thrilling, teasing, light-asairness of Carol 
Lofner's divine dance music . . . And don't forget 
David and Hilda Murray ... and the Cosmopolitan 
Hotel's famous Parisian cooking. 

The prices? We'll whisper them, but they deserve 
to be SHOUTED out loud! 

FRIDAY . . . Dinner and Dance 6:30 to I, $1.50 per person 
(no couvert charge). Dancing only, 8 to 1, 75c per person. 

SATURDAY . . . Dinner and Dance 6:30 to 1, 81.50 per person 
(no couvert charge). Dancing only, 8 to 1, $1 per person. 

SUNDAY. .Dinner and Dance 6:30 to 12, 81 per person 
(no couvert charge). Dancing only, 9 to 12, 50c per personf 

Cosmopolitan 

Denver's Leading Hostelry Sfi||||^| 



_6_ 
*■ 



THE TIGER 



Friday, October 13, 1933 






WAGNER-FULTS 
STUDIO 

Official Photographer 

for 

Colorado College 

"Portraits That Please" 



Burns Theatre Building 
Elevator Service 



♦ 
t 

t 
t 
t 
t 
t 
t 
t 
I 
t 



Let us do the Dirty 
Work This Year 

Expert Furnace Cleaning 
Reasonable Rates 

HEYSE 

SHEET METAL 

WORKS 

219 No. Weber St. 




College Days 

are here 
again 



— and what 

could be smarter 
than these fashionable 



— and only 

$7.50 



COLLEGE BRED 
OXFORDS 

with built up leather 
heels and Kiltie tongues 

In suede finish brown service 
calf and brown mandrucca — 
just the shoe to wear to the 
games. 



^ : 



>ee 



jfrco 



POT — 
SPIGOT 

No Cover Charge 



m 



MIIIIIIIIIMIIIMIIIIII Illlllllllllllllllllllllllll Illllllllllilll Illllll I , 

Watch inspectors for C. R. I. & P. Ry. 
and U. P. Ry. 

C.B.LAUTERMAN 

JEWELER and OPTOMETRIST 

FINE 

WATCH — CLOCK 

AND JEWELRY 

REPAIRING 

40 years at 121 North Tejon St. 
Colorado Springs 

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I Reward's 

0^2 Barber 
■ Shop 



19 East Bijou Street 



Don't Miss This 
BACHELOR'S 

DANCE 

BROADMOOR NITE CLUB 
Johnny Metzler's Orchestra 

Friday, October 20 
Couples $1.00 Stags 75c 



Subscribe NOW for The 



GAZETTE ^TELEGRAPH 

Morning— Evening— Sunday "All The News All The Time" 



Daily Only 
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Daily and Sunday 
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Combination 
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26 N. Tejon 



HOLDS WORLDS RECORD 

612 Sold in One Day 
AN ECONOMICAL NECESSITY 

STOKOL 

THE WORLD'S GREATEST STOKER 



Reduce 



COAL BILLS 20',; to 50'/, 
OIL BILLS - 40% to 75% 
GAS BILLS - 50% to 80% 



FOR INFORMATION PHONE OR CALL AT 

Bum steads 



Phone M. 597 



414 E. Dale 



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BUY LAUNDRY SERVICE NOW 



WRA 




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The^ President's program that all who can should buy applies to 
the service we render as much as to the purchase of merchandise. 
Each additional bundle sent us increases the buying power of 
our forty-seven employees. 

Notwithstanding the increase in salaries and supplies the follow- 
ing articles are laundered at the old prices. 



Quilts 

Rag Rugs, per pound 

Navajo Rugs, per pound 

Pillows, each 

Feather Beds 

Cotton Blankets, per pair 

Woolen Blankets, per pair 



35^ 

$1.50 
30^ 
60^ 



We Wash Everything With Ivory Soap 



Pearl Laundry 

329-331 North Tejon St.— at Boulder 
Phones Main 1085—1086 

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"SWEDE" ROARK 

"Tradition says - - - - 
We are the fighting 
Tigers 

We are out to uphold 
this tradition - - - 




JOHN MIHALICK 

"The Tigers are out 
to beat New Mexico 
Normal as a stimulant 
for the game of games 
next week with Den- 
ver." 



••» , 



Issued each week during the academic year. Entered at the >ost Office at Colorado Springs as Second-Class Matter. 



THE TIGER 



Friday, October 20, 1933 



Pack Bags 
Laundry Bags 
Hikers Supplies 

THE OUTWEST 

TENT and AWNING CO. 



M. 1261 



18 E. Kiowa 



To Maintain 
A Payroll in 
Colorado Springs 




COAL 

Phone Main 577 



*• 
» 



The best way to tell of the 
beauty of Colorado, Stand- 
ley's Color Pictures, Hand- 
Colored — 35 cents up. 

H.L. Standley 

PHOTOGRAPHER 



224 No. Tejon St. 

Colorado Springs 



Same quality work — 
a real Hair cut for 

PETE'S BARBER SHOP 

8 E. Cucharras 



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A Typwriter 

— an Aid to Education 

The investment is small — 
payment as low as $4.00 a 
month may be made — and we 
carry every make machine. 



The 

Typewriter 

Man 



125 N. Tejon St. 
Phone Main 95 




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sensible package 



We wanted to sell it for 10 cents 
so we put Granger in a sensible soft 
foil pouch — easy to carry and keeps 
the tobacco just exactly right — just like 
it was made. 

Granger . . . good tobacco . . .Well- 
man Method . . . cut right . . . packed 
right. And there is this much about it: 

We have yet to know of a 
man who started to smoke 
Granger who didn't keep 
on. Folks seem to like it. 



a sensible package 
10 cents 





ranger Rough Cut 

— the tobacco that's MADE FOR PIPES 



|B 19^. l.tcr.TTTf: MYERS TotMrro Co. 



IRA C. DUGAN 

Jeweler and OptometrUt 

Fine Watch and Clock Repairing 

Eyes Examined — Glasses Fitted 

— Lenses Duplicated — 

Phone Main 1702-J 9 N. Tejon St. 



Quality "Master" Cleaners 

Only one Quality and the 
Price is uniform 

H. A. Thompson 
Main 1-8-1-1 10 E. Kiowa 



^ "MM" 

ACROSS FROM MURRAY'S 



THE TIGER 



VOLUME XXXVI 



COLORADO COLLEGE WEEKLY NEWS-MAGAZINE 



Number 5 




♦Stars 

Koshare — 

Presenting the P. G. Wodehouse 
comedy, "A Damsel in Distress" 
with a first-year cast, Koshare opens 
its season in Cogswell Theater next 
Wednesday and Thursday evenings, 
Oct. 25 and 26 




ANN DANIELS 

"Alice Farraday" 

Koshare is fortunate in having 
an unusually experienced cast this 
year with Tom Ross, a graduate of 
Shenandoah high school, Shenan- 
doah, la., playing the important 
part of Captain Plummer. Ross 
played the lead in "Fifty-Fifty" in 
high school, and also appeared in 
"The Belle of Barcelona", "The 
Ferguson Family", and "The Thir- 
teenth Chair." 

Elizabeth Dewing, who plays 
Lady Caroline Higgins, is from Le- 
ander R. Peck high school, West 
Barrington, R. I., and also attended 
Packer Collegiate Institute in 
Brooklyn, N. Y., where she played 
in "Skidding," "Milestones", and 
"Queen Halsheput'*. 

Dick Rogers has the part of 
George Bevan, is from Colorado 
Springs high school where was was 
president of Masque and Sandal, 
and played the lead in "The Goose 
Hangs High", "So This is London," 
and "Broken Dishes". 

Marion Marriott graduated from 
East high, Denver, and has the part 
of Lady Maud. Pauline Hoopes, 
from Colorado Springs high school, 
plays Lady Prudence. 




JAMES McCARTY 

"Percy" 

James McCarty, played Dr. Ea- 
bry in "R. U. R." last year, and 
Joseph Rustin, who takes the part 



Tintypes 

For many years there has been 
evidence of dissatisfaction because 
photographs for the Nuggett could 
be taken at only one studio. Be- 
cause of this, a new system will be 
introduced this year. Arrangements 
have been made with three studios 
in Colorado Springs to take photo- 
graphs for the 1934 Pikes Peak 
Nugget. These are Payton studio, 
30 South Tejon; The Wagner-Fults 
studio, Burns building, and the 
Emery studio, 1 7 East Cache la 
Poudre. 

These photographers are cooper- 
ating with the Nugget staff to make 
all the pictures uniform as to size, 
background, etc. The price will also 
be uniform at all the studios; $2, 
entitling the student to four sittings 
and all the solios needed, or $3.75 
for four sittings, all the solios need- 
ed and a dozen finished photo- 
graphs. 



Alumni Club 

of COLORADO COLLEGE in 
Denver will hold a dinner meeting 
at the Olin hotel, Friday, Nov. 3. 
Prof. C. B. Malone will speake on 
"The Manchurian Conflict". Dr. C. 
B. Hershey will give current events 
at C. C. Stewart Wilson, '30, is 
president of the club. Mrs. W. D. 
Van Stone, '13, is president of the 
women's group. Peter Holm will 
preside at the meeting. 



"Boost Colorado College" 

will be the slogan of the reor- 
ganized Y. M. C. A. club which 
will present a program Thursday 
night at 9 o'clock in Cossitt Com- 
mons to which all C. C. men are 
invited. Representatives for various 
activities will be chosen. 



of Reggie in the freshman show, 
comes from Newton high school, 
Newton, Mass. 

Bud Udick, who acts the police- 
man role, was graduated from 
Cheyenne Mountain high school, 
where he played leads in "Dear 
Brutus", "The Swan", "King Ar- 
timenes and the Unknown Warrior' , 
"The Littlest Wise Man". 

Marcus Shivers, Colorado Springs 
high school, plays Keggs. In high 
school he played the lead in "Over 
the Garden Wall". 

Louise Yaden, Cheyenne Moun- 
tain high school, who acts Albertine 
Keggs. did "The Travelers", "Dear 
Brutus", "Lima Beans", and "King 
Argimenes" in high school. 



Full Program 

Homecoming with all the trimm- 
ings will be celebrated Friday and 
Saturday, November 10 and 1 1, and 
all the COLORADO COLLEGE or- 
ganizations will take part in doing 
their biggest and best to welcome 
back the grads. 

Friday will see all fraternity and 
sorority houses decorated. At 7:30 
a pep bonfire will be held in Cossitt 
bowl. At 10 o'clock Homecoming 
queen will be crowned at the dance 
sponsored by the Growler and Tiger 
clubs at Hiawatha gardens. 

Saturday the big Homecoming 
parade will be held with the Armis- 
tice day parade. It will start at 10: 
30 and will pause for one minute at 
1 1 o'clock in memory of those who 
lost their lives in behalf of their 
country. Fraternities, sororities, 
Growler and Tiger Clubs and assoc- 
iated students will be represented by 
floats in the parade. Cups will be 
given the winning fraternity and 
sorority floats and the best decorat- 
ed houses. At 12 o'clock a banquet 
for the alumni will be given in 
Bemis hall. 

The football game will be the 
main event of the afternoon, with 
Brigham Young university being the 
opposition for the Tigers. During 
the intermission there will be a par- 
ade of the winning floats. After the 
game fraternity and sorority houses 
will be open for the grads. Ban- 
quets will be held by several. An 
American Legion dance at the city 
auditorium will conclude the day. 



♦Wedding Bells 

Married 

Walter Clark "Sonny" Wrye, 

Sophomore from Newton, Mass.; 
Phi Gam of COLORADO COL- 
LEGE; Koshare actor; brother-in 
law of Jack Dern, C. C. '24 and 
Gratia Adams, Brookline, Mass., de- 
butante; Theta pledge; and sopho- 
more, having spent her freshman 
year at Vassar. 

Dorothy Chamberlin, titian-haired 
Kappa graduated from C. C. last 
June and prominent in Tiger and 
Nugget work, to one Augustus 0. 
Awes, graduate of Colorado Agri- 
clutural college, a Sigma Alpha 
Epsilon, and now creamery man of 
San Diego, Calif. The wedding was 
held in San Diego Oct. 5, where the 
couple is now at home at Biltmore 
Apts., 1166 Twelfth St. 

In Baton Rouge, La. Oct. 14, 
Genevieve Engel, COLORADO 
COLLEGE '31, Delta Gamma, pro- 
minent in musical circles here and 
teacher for the last two years in 
Penrose, Colo., and Jerry Cogan, 
C. C. '30, Phi Gam, Phi Beta, Delta 
Epsilon, M. A. from Massachusetts 
Tech. and now with the Standard 
Oil Co. in Baton Rouge. 



Aspiring actors 

of COLORADO COLLEGE will 
be given their chance in the play, 
"Mary the Third", presented by the [ 
Colorado Springs Drama club in the 
Little theatre Oct. 23 and 24. Wen- j 
dell Carlson, Jack Kintz, William 
Hanev, Ralph Smith and Gratia 
Bell Blackmail are prominent mem- 
bers of the cast. 



Take Heed Freshmen 

At future football games, fresh- 
men men will be compelled to sit 
together. This was announced fol- 
lowing a meeting of the Red Lan- 
tern club, held in Palmer Thursday. 

It was decided at this meeting 
that the annual "tug of war" will 
be held between halves of the C. C. 
New Mexico Normal game. Twenty 
sophomores and 20 freshmen will 
be appointed to uphold their class 
spirit. 

Jack Conley was elected presi- 
dent of the club, Carl Maynard is 
secretary; Don Glidden, treasurer. 



Architecture 

Dr. Carroll B. Malone of the De- 
partment of History has recently 
conducted the classes in English 
History, and Medieval and Modern 
History on inspection tours of shove 
Chapel, with particular regard for 
the architecture, paintings and win- 
dows. 

COLORADO COLLEGE is par- 
ticularly fortunate in having Shove 
Chapel and Grace Church two 
splendid examples of Normanesque, 
and Gothic workmanship, accord- 
ing to Dr. Malone, who stated that 
there are few better replicas in this 
country. 

Dr. Malone stated that there will 
be a prize awarded by the "Colon- 
ial Dames" for the best essary on 
Colonial History, to be given to a 
member of the class on American 
History. 



Two Minds 

with two thoughts seem to be the 
case when we learn that the Colo- 
rado Aggies Dramatic Club has cho- 
sen for its first play of the year a 
show by the authors of our Fresh- 
man play, Ian Hay and P. G. Wode- 
house. The Aggies play is entitled 
"Leave it to Psmith." 



THE TIGER 



Friday, October 20, 1933 



THE TIGER 




Editor LEW CROSBY 

Business Manager Everett Stapleton 



+ Hints 

cast by pedantic individuals, collectively or singly, are rarely worth 
the four inches of copy devoted in the editorial column of the Blasting 
Bugle to the editorial policy of this publication. And editors who allow 
blanket criticisms of other college publications as to the poor support 
of the NRA given by the latter, should be the last to make pithy cracks 
concerning the "minding of one's own business." 



♦ Hello 

is just another way of introducing the (first) publication of the 
COLORADO COLLEGE TIGER under the new editor and staff. We 
can but offer our best in the publication of this, your news magazine. 
You, as a reading public merit a news agency the best that we can give 
and, with your cooperation we are going to try to make that "best" of 
real value both to you and to us. 

♦ Fight 

The rumblings and roarings following last week's "lucky Tiger" 
can only mean one thing. That COLORADO COLLEGE student, both 
on the team and in the stands are getting the well-known dander up. 
That, precisely, was one of the reasons for the allusion. We can't have 
a winning club, nor a winning institution for that matter if lethargic 
would-be Tigers twiddle their thumbs when they should be tearing thier 
vocal cords apart. Until we get fighting mad, we'll just have to take 
'em. The other papers in this region make no bones about telling the 
truth, so why should the TIGER. We are vitally interested in the well- 
being of COLORADO COLLEGE on or off the football field. And now, 
lets use some of that fighting spirit at the game this afternoon. We'll all 
gain by it. 



Ambitious Writers 

gathered last night around a 
cheery fire in the W. A. A. house 
for the opening meeting of the stu- 
dent's literary club, recently organ- 
ized for men and women interested 
in writing and appreciation of lit- 
erature. 

The group had as its guest Miss 
Margaret Todd Ritter, who spoke on 
poetry and read verse. Another fea- 
ture of the program was the read- 
ing of one of the winning poems of 
the last Evelyn May Bridges poetry 
contest by Marjorie Avalon. 



The First Book 

received by Coburn Library at 
COLORADO COLLEGE was printed 
in 1877. It in entitled the Science of 
Languages by Abel Haulacque. It 
was presented to the library by the 
First Congegational Church of Den- 
ver. This book is not the oldest how- 
ever. Some of the dates go back as 
far as I 760, and even earlier. 



Mothers 

The Womens Educational Society 
of COLORADO COLLEGE enter- 
tained the mothers of COLORADO 
COLLEGE students at its annu- 
al meeting held in Bemis Commons, 
Monday October 16. Business con- 
cluded, readings by Miss Ruth 
Langstrom, dramatic expression in- 
structor and piano solos by Jack 
Kintz offered entertainment to cli- 
max a delightful evening. 

The Women's Educational Soc- 
iety was founded 45 years ago for 
the pumose of aiding college stu- 
dents through loans and scholar- 
shins. Its funds come from the dues 
o fthe members and from gifts. 



Gum Chewing 

aids studying and is a good habit 
to form, is the report from Los An- 
geles Junior College. 'Especially at 
examination time," Professor Warn- 
er Broun insists, "it provides stud- 
ents a sort of sub-conscious back- 
ground for their work. 

— Los Angeles Junior Collegian 



Friday the thirteenth 

was the date of the Gamma Phi 
Beta dance which was given in hon- 
or of the new pledges at the chap- 
ter house. To offset the malign in- 
fluences of the hoodoo day, horse 
shoes, dice, four leaf clovers, and 
other symbols of good luck were 
used for decoration. The pledges 
are: the Misses Elizabeth Richter, 
Mary Elizabeth F i g e e. Phyllis 
Thompson. Betty Reid, Bortha Trot- 
ter. Helen McCandlish. Doris Shock. 
Marguerite Ridge, Edith Southard, 
Winnie McBroom, Reba Raney, 
Doris Wylie, Muriel Hess, Mary 
Hyatt. 



Chapter Eternal 

of Sigma Chi claimed Joseph B. 
Corrin Jr., who passed away Friday 
night after a brief illness. "Joe", as 
he was known to his friends on the 
campus, was a junior in the COLO- 
campus, was a junior in the Colo- 
rado College school of Social 

Joe entered Colorado Co-1 
lege from Colorado Springs High 
School where he made an enviable 
record for himself. He edited the 
C. S. H. S. "Lever" in his senior 
year. In Colorado College he 
maintained his qualifications for all- 
round ability and was active outside 
his school work in the Young Peo- 
ple's Department and as usher in 
the First Methodist Church. 

Joe lived in Colorado Springs 
with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Jos- 
eph B. Corrin, Sr. at 119 E. St. 
Vrain. He leaves two sisters, Mrs. 
Henry M. Wilson 1 12 N. Wahsatch, 
and Mrs. Geo. C. Brewer, Drennan 
Colo., and one brother, Edwin Cor- 
rin of San Antosio, Texas. 



The circus is coming. 

Everything from sideshows to 
pink lemonade will be found at the 
W. A. A. playday circus Saturday. 
One hundred girls from 25 high 
schools in southern Colorado will 
come to COLORADO COLLEGE 
for the annual playday and to par- 
ticipate in a regular circus and in 
a variety of games. Clowns, ele- 
phants, seals, cowboys, bareback 
riders, trapeze artists will all be 
seen, with the visiting girls taking 
the parts. 

The parade will begin promptly 
at 10:15 a. m., led by the Tiger 
club and a comb band. It will ter- 
minate with an inspection of all the 
buildings on the C. C. campus. And 
not least important will come the 
hot dogs and pink lemonade served 
in true big top style following the 
sideshow and main performance. 

Florence Robinson is chairman of 
the playday activities. Helen Mar- 
garet Shaw is in charge of registra- 
tion, Louie Marie Mason is respon- 
sible for decorations and Mary Jo 
Sparkman has planned the enter- 
tainment. Francesca Hall, president 
of the Women's Athletic association, 
is in general charge. 

RIP 'EM UP TIGERS 
Pikes Peak or Bust 

was the motto of Dorothea Carle- 
ton, Ruth Crawford, Norma Garret, 
Eileen Hale and Eleanor Hastings 
who conquered C. C.'s mascot Sun- 
day. Miss Marion Fezer and Mrs. 
Louise W. Fauteaux accompanied 
the group to Gillette where the hik- 
ers began their climb. The tempera- 
ture at the summit was 27 degrees 
above zero. The girls descended by 
the Barr Trail, making the whole 
trip of twenty miles in about twelve 
hours. 



NOTICE 
Class elections will be held 
Thursday, Oct. 19. Everyone 
urged to vote. 



is 



AH college students, and especial- 
ly freshmen are urged to get their 
student hand books. These books 
outline many of the activities of the 
college and are invaluable for first 
year students. The women may ob- 
tain theirs at Giddings while the 
men are asked to obtain theirs at 
Perkins Shearer. Slips for identi- 
fication are not needed. 



There will be a meeting of The 
Tiger staff Tuesday at 3:30 in the 
Pit (Room 3) Palmer hall. All 
members of the staff must be there 
unless excused because of classes, 
laboratory or work. 

The First Fish 

Study of the remains of what is 
believed to have been the first fish 
will be the object of a trip to Canon 
City tommorrow by Prof. H. E. 
Mathias and Richard Ragle, instruc- 
tor in Geology. Geological forma- 
tioss will also be studied during the 
jouiuey to the western city. Any 
students interested in the trip should 
call Prof. Mathias before Friday 
evening. 



Motor Fuel 

of the future may be made from 
coal tar if experiments being con- 
ducted by Charles Bordner and 
Prof. Douglas of the chemistry de- 
partment of COLORADO COL- 
LEGE are successful. 

The process being studied is the 
low temperature carbonization of 
coal which has already resulted in 
the separation of 10 distinct pro- 
ducts. 

COLORADO COLLEGE FIGHT 
Youth rushes in 

where angels fear to tread", using 
this blind faith and ardor of young 
men and women as his theme, Dr. 
James G. McMurtry spoke on 
"Youth, Look Forward" at chapel 
Tuesday. 

"It is the initiative of the younger 
generation that adds impetus to the 
conservatism of old age and keeps 
the mind world from stagnation," 
he asserted. "They believe in them- 
selves. They have the self-confidence 
that casts mountains into the sea, 
and, until this faith is lost, they are 
kings." 

Photographers 
Acids 

eating slowly into zinc plates, was 
one of the steps in photo-engraving 
shown to part of Prof. Jack Law- 
sen's Joursahsm 301 class this 
morning at Stewart Brothers en- 
graving plant. 

The process whereby a photo- 
graps is reproduced on a printing 
plate is an important part of pic- 
torial duplication for newspapers. 



Friday, October 20, 1933 



THE TIGER 



KEYHOLE KEEPER 

Pledges of the pink and blue of 
Beta Theta Pi pulled the well-known 
fast one on the big boys last Mon- 
day night. It seems that when the 
pledges were through with their 
meeting, instead of waiting for the 
customary business to be transacted 
with the actives afterwards, the 
freshmen all skipped out and went 
to the movies. Result: Several sore 
whoozis-es around the campus the 
next dav. (We hope the big bad 
wolves Finger, Curzan, Kelly, Wat- 
ers, and the rest of the sisterhood 
weren't too hard on the kiddies). 



Park Eckles and Dave Baker look 
alike. . . . Marian Galbraith, ex'34 
up from Pueblo to visit here the oth- 
er day. . . . looking very smart in 
a brown all-suede outfit (even her 
hat) .... "Buckskin Joe", her old 
fl^me Ed Johnson called her . . . . 
Eleanor Lynch has her sister here 
in school now .... a transfer from 

D. U the other day I asked a 

blue-eyed lost loking kid where he 
lived — he said, "Next door to the 
Sig Chi frat house!". . . . evidently 
the Phi Delts got to him first .... 
the DCs certainly got a big bunch 
of pledges (or vice versa) . . . . 
Glidden's only comment to a Tiger 
reporter on Chamberlin's recent 
marriage was, "I hope she'll be 
happy" .... Wanted: a man — any 
man — apply, Dodo Skidmore .... 
the Phi Gams certainly treat their 
pledges nice (especially when they 
drive Chrysler phaetons) .... and 
while we're on the Fijis: Lowell 
loks like an unfinished clay model 
with his N. R. A. haircut . . . .our 
nomination for the self-appointed 
popularity queen: Dorothy Weaver 
.... Mel Sheldon this year looks 
like a freshly washed poodle with 
a big pink ribbon around its neck 
.... it seems that the absence of 
Plenty Keen Eastman has done them 
both a lot of good, or is it that GB 
is getting a broken heart on the re- 
bound .... How to Cure College 
Cut-ups: Have them marry Boston 
debutantes (but what about the par- 
ty of the third part?) .... I see by 
the social calendar that the Kappa 
Sigs are having two barn dances — 
wouldn't the City Aud. do just as 
well? .... (something should be 
done about the proofreading in this 
bleat — it's worse than this column) 
. . . .We wonder what the Kappas 
did with their two left over corsages 
on pledge day .... athletics might 
be overemphasized, but not this 
year — the alumni are too busy look- 
ing for jobs for themselves. ... the 
Gamma Phis are coming up this 
year — they're having somebody be- 
sides Delta Alphs to their dances. . 
.... p. s.: we'll get the Thetas 
next week! Flash— Franny Willis 
and Carlos Fischer "are practically 
engaged" (authentic from the gal). 




/ 







I'VE SWUNG 
many a stick and I know 
how to spin 'em. 

"I've smoked many a 
cigarette and I know how 
to taste 'em. 

"Chesterfields are milder 
— they taste better — and 
man they do satisfy!" 



© 1933. Liggett & Myers Tobacco Co 



esterfield 



the cigarette that's MILDER 

the cigarette that TASTES better 



PAUDRE PAUFFE TI photographs 

BEAUTY SHOPPE ! n J 1 ^ '^ thal on 1 ly y0 " c * n ,g ive , 

Official Photographer, C. C. Nugget 

The best place for a rest facial. PAYTON STUDIO 

Phone 717-J 222 N. Tejon , 30 S. Tejon Phone M. 477-J 



Strachan's 

SWEET SHOP 

Bijou and Nevada 



THE TIGER 



Friday, October 20, 1933 



BISSEL'S PHARMACY 

HENRY E. COPELAND, Prop. 

A Tiger Booster 

Tel. ML 980 Corner Dale and Weber 

PROMPT DELIVERY 



Colorado College 

TEXT BOOKS 

AND SUPPLIES 

C. C. and Fraternity 

Stationery 

Laundry Bags — $2 00 Each 

Murray Drug Co. 

Across From the Campus 



Geology 

Prof. H. E. Mathias, received thir- 
ty-five separates on Geology sub- 
jects in the province of Alberta. 
There were sent to Prof. Mathias 
by Dr. J. A. Allan, professor of Ge- 
ology at the University of Alberta, 
at Edmington, Canada. 

Clay Pomeroy is studying law at 
the University of Oregon. 



^wematt 



FASHION-BUILT 



Reasonable 
Prices 

Dependable 
Service 



We wash everything with 
Ivory Soap. 



<Gh 



tc 




earl 



WORN WITH 
PRIDE BY 
MILLIONS 



• Freeman Fashion-Built 
styles for Fall and Winter 
offer new smartness, new 
comfort, new quality of 
workmanship and leathers 
at prices that appeal to every 
man. Come in and see how 
far your shoe money can go. 



LAUNDRY 

Phones M. 1085-1086 




oeCb. 



110 S. Tejon St. 





^^ 


Printing 

or hy 

Jilt DENT AN 

PRINTING 
Co- 




'Vhone Main 602 
23 West Colorado Aoe. 

COLORADO SPRINGS 





PORT 




Tiger Huddle 

"Chris" Marlowe 
COLORADO COLLEGE Tigers 
are in for one of the hardest games 
on their conference schedule next 
Saturday when they invade Pioneer 
stadium. Denver boasts of having 
one of the best teams ever pro- 
duced in the capital city and plen- 
ty of Pioneer smoke will rise from 
the greensward as the Pioneers at- 
tempt to take into camp a snarling 

Tiger eleven. 

*•* ■•• ■•■ 

Last week's score doping? Mon- 
tana State fell down on us by de- 
feating Teachers. We are thinking 
of leaving Greeley off the list from 
now on. We sincerely believe that 
COLORADO COLLEGE will beat 
New Mexico, which is just another 
way of saying that we have faith in 
the new October model of the Sep- 
tember Tiger team. 

COLORADO COLLEGE, 18; 
New Mex., 0. 

C. U., 6; Colorado Aggies, 3. 

Brigham Young, 20; Western 

State, 0. 

Teachers, 12; Wyoming, 6. 
••• >•* >*. 

What ho! It was one of those 
moments when the Tigers were 
smacked for a fifteen yard loss via 
the penalty route during the Wyo- 
ming game. Back of me sat a dis- 
gruntled Tiger rooter. After having 
watched the official count off ten or 
twelve steps followed by the two j 
teams, this guy could finally stand 
it no longer. He rose and piped up, j 
"Penalty? Hell, that ain't no pen- 
alty, that's a migration." 
••• ■•- ■•• 

In the latest football rating sheet 
which has just been released show- ! 
ing the comparative ranking of 
every grid team in the U. S. we find 
that COLORADO COLLEGE stands 
first with a total of 82. Colorado 
U. comes second with a ranking of 
1 12, Colorado Aggies came third 
with a ranking of 115 and Denver 
University with a total of 131. 

Some of the teams which rank 
under these Rocky Mountain grid 
teams are: Yale, Kansas Aggies, 
Duke, Harvard, Carnegie Tech. 
Navy, Dartmouth, Rutgers, and 
Ohio. Hail — COLORADO COL- 
LEGE! 

••« ••• ••• 

Reminder: Students bringing 
dogs to future football games at 
Washburn will not be admitted at 
the gate. 

Separate 

cheering sections for the girls at 
future football games wes decided 
upon Thursday at a meeting of the 
Associated Women students. Seats 
for girls will be separate as well as 
a special rooting section for men 
students. 




COACH VAN de GRAAFF 

"We shall konw the full strength 
of our term after they encounter 
the strong New Mexico Normal ag- 
gregation. The team is in a better 
shape than they were two weeks 
ago when they tied Wyoming." 



Colorado College vs. New Mexico 
Normal 

The Tigers will again take up 
gridiron warfare at Washburn sta- 
dium this afternoon when they play 
a non-conference game with the 
strong New Mexico Cowboys from 
Las Vegas. The Cowboys boast of 
a strong defensive team and from 
all indications, the Tigers will be in 
for a busy afternoon. 

Stuart Clark, mentor of the Cow- 
boy eleven is widely known in this 
conference and his team's appear- 
ance has been widely anticipated 
here. Coach van de Graff has been 
drilling his proteges until dusk every 
evening in an attempt to strengthen 
his line and perfect a yardage pro- 
ducing attack. 

Next week, the Tigers travel to 
the Pioneer encampment where they 
will meet the strong D. U. aggrega- 
tion in a game which will have defi- 
nite bearing on conference stand- 
ing. 

"Tennis Technique" 

was the title of a talk given by 
Harold Beatty at W. A. A.'s invi- 
tation meeting. Features of the eve- 
ning's entertainment were demon- 
strations by Mr. Beatty, teniquoit 
games, horshoe throwing by the 
light of a bonfire, and autumn re- 
freshments. 



Cross Country Run 

Between halves of the Brigham 
Young Colorado College game here 
November 1 I . the annual cross- 
country run will be held with large 
turnouts from all the Greek letter 
organizations. The same routts of 
the run will be held with the start 
in front of the bleachers and thru 
Monument valley park. All under- 
classmen are urged to take part in 
this event which is held traditionally 
at Homecoming. 



Friday, October 20, 1933 



THE TIGER 



JOHNNY METZLER'S BAND 
Couples $1. Stags 75c 



BACHELORS CLUB DANCE 



BROADMOOR NITE CLUB 
TONITE— FRIDAY 20 



CANDIES AND NUTS 
FOR ALL OCCASIONS 

HUGHES 
CANDY SHOP 

128 N. TEJON 



OEC-LA-TAy 

NEW V LINE 




HI EH, WIDE 
LI N E5 

"'Dec-La-Tay" is cut in a deep "V" at 
the center front to give you an alluring 
Spread-apart "unbrassieretT' effect, yet 
Uplifts and supports the bust perfectly. 
The back is extremely low. "Dec-La- 
iay" is also made completely backless, 
for evening wear. This is only one of 
ptiany beautiful new Maiden Form 
;reations. Write for free booklet. Dept. 
CI. Maiden Form Brassiere Co., Inc., 
Mew York, N. Y. 



f F ull -Fashion" — the 
ra$siere that ft fits 
tfif a stocking" is 
hmpletfily seamless 
Urough the breast sec- 
tons, for a "sfcin- 
ptooth'* effect. It 
times in narrow ban- 
\rmi\ as well as in 
youble Support styles 
ike the one shown here 




AT ALL LEADING STORES 



iook rot rt« NAMt O «e " ' "f off 
Vy ^ B fcy-A S SI E IkE S J 

GIA.DlSS.CAtt.TEH. IH'I 



NONE GENUINE WITHOUT THIS [ABEl 



Maiden Form Garments Sold 
in Colorado Springs at 

Kaufmans 

DEPARTMENT STORE 



The Social Calendar. 
Friday, October 20 

Football — C. C. - New Mexico 
Normal. 

Delta Gamma pledge dance. 

Delta Alpha Phi pledge dance. 
Saturday, October 21 

W. A. A. Play Day for girls from 
high schools of Southern Colo- 
rado. 

Lawrence Tibbett concert. 

Sigma Chi pledge dance 

Kappa Sigma Barn dance 
October 25 

Koshare Play 
Thursday, October 26 

Koshare Play 
Friday, October 27 

Sigma Chi Tea Dance 

A. W. S. Costume Ball 
Saturday, October 28 
versity at Denver. 



Paddles with Pictures 

of the pledges decorated the walls 
of the Fiji house for their pledge 
dance last Friday night. The guests 
who danced to the music of Johnny 
Metzler's orchestra were: 

Hester Jane Butcher, Betty Fos- 
ter, Betty Skidmore, Jane Roth, 
Marietta Sinton, Olive Bradley, 
Phyllis Franz, Ruth Bradley, Kate 
Haney, Imogene Young, Lois Ward, 
Janice Greenwood, Maxine Danford, 
Julia Dunham, Lois Waldorf, Cath- 
erine Corning, Wilhelmina Mein- 
holtz, Claramae Bowler, Helen Wal- 
more, Marguerite Anscomb, Lucille 
Fessenden, Carolyn Huxley, Jean 
Coyle, Anne Daniels, Martha How- 
ell, Betty Christian, Dorothy Weav- 
er, Dorothy Jamieson, Luzilla Eu- 
bank, Nadine Kent, Ethel Hughes, 
Mary Hoag, Virginia San ford, Mur- 
iel McClanahan, Ruth Laughlin, 
Eileen Woods. 



A Birthday 

was celebrated by the Gamma 
Phi Beta sorority on Sunday even- 
ing, Oct. 15, at the chapter house. 
The birthday supper was in honor 
of the first anniversary of the in- 
stallation of the sorority at COLO- 
RADO COLLEGE. Excitement after 
the supper was furnished by the 
pledges' prophesies of the lurid fu- 
tures of the active members. The 
hostesses of the evening were Mrs. 
R. J. Gilmore, and the Misses Billv 
Sulivan and Bertha Maxeiner. 



Austin Bluffs 

was the scenic background for 
the picnic given for the faculty of 
the School of Natural Sciences on 
Wednesday night by Dr. and Mrs. 
P. E. Boucher, Dr. and Mrs. R. J. 
Gilmore, and Prof, and Mrs. H. E. 
Mathias. The guests met at the ad- 
ministration Building, and from 
there rode in state to the picnic in 
the Geology bus. 



CHAPEL CALENDAR 
Tuesday, Oct. 24, 10:00 A. M.— 

Chapel Service. Speaker: Dr. 
John Skeen, Pastor First Baptist 
Church. 
Thursday, Oct. 26, 5:00 P. M.— 

The First in the fourth group of 
Five o'Clock Addresses. There will 
be four lectures in this group, fall- 
ing on consecutive Thursdays. The 
general topic of this series is "Job". 
The public is cordially invited to at- 
tend. 



Carrie Coed's Letter 

By dint of much friendly chatter 
in Bible class, I managed to rate the 
Inter-fraternity dance. 

It was a couple of weeks ago at 
Hiawatha and the music was grand. 
Everyone was there with gret gobs 
of stags, which always makes life 
interesting. 

That afternoon had been the oc- 
casion of the Wyoming-C. C. game. 
We held them to no score, and I 
must here mention that they also 
held us to no score. But it was a 
good game and I got a tremendous 
thrill out of it all. The Tiger club 
was there in full force. They wear 
the cutest orange sweat shirts and 
outside of the fact that all the girls 
look like two pounds less than a 
horse, the effect was very notty. 

I went to the library tonight. 
Something is radically wrong. There 
was not a seat available on the 
main floor, so I was forced to sit 
in a lonesome cubbyhole up in the 
balcony. I couldn't even see the boys 
that came in the door, so the even- 
ing was wasted. In case you might 
get the wrong impression from the 
word "library", let me tell you it 
is the social center from 7:30 to 
9:30 every evening. All who have 
not dates may arrange it at the lib. 
Interesting custom. 

Studiously yours — 
Carrie 



Initiation 

Delta Gamma held initiation at 
Montgomery Hall on Saturday, Oct. 
14, for seven pledges and five al- 
umnae who were initiated in the 
afternoon. 

Those receiving the anchor are 
the Misses Elizabeth Barrie, Helen 
Miller, Elizabeth Platta, Virginia 
Sanford, Catherine Corning, Jane 
Kimzey, Margaret Wilm, and the 
Mesdames Margaret Lawhead, Stel- 
la Chambers, Ossie Coolbaugh, Mir- 
iam Hartwell, Sylvia Perkins. 

A banquet was held at the Broad- 
moor Hotel in the evening in honor 
of the new initiates. Decorations 
were carried out in the fraternity's 

colors of bronze, pink, and blue. 

■•• .«. ■•■ 

Beta Delta of Delta Gamma an- 
nounces the pledging of Natalie 
Wittichan of Miami, Florida. 



WAGNER-FULTS 
STUDIO 

Official Photographer 

for 

Colorado College 

"Portraits That Please" 

Burns Theatre Building 
Elevator Service 



* 



'You're Sure They're Pure" 



Derngood 
Caramels 
25c lb. 



One of the most popular 
of the outstanding Dern- 
good Candy Features — all 
kinds in the assortment. 
A splendid feature for 
Saturday, the 21st. 



26 S. Tejon 



Dern'; 



Let us do the Dirty 
Work This Year 

Expert Furnace Cleaning 
Reasonable Rates 

HEYSE 

SHEET METAL 

WORKS 

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THE TIGER 



Friday, October 20, 1933 



KOSHARE presents 



WEDNESDAY, OCT. 25 
THURSDAY, OCT. 26 



COGSWELL THEATRE 
Bemis Hall 



Student Admission 35c 
General Admission 50c 
Reserved Admission 75c 




"Guess I'll 
write the 
folks . . .** 

"Why write? 
Call them up 

— it sure 
saves time." 



No matter how many miles away, home is 
only a minute away, by telephone. Just give 
the Long Distance operator your home tele- 
phone number and talk with the whole fam- 
ily. It's next best to seeing them. 

Rates are lowest after 8:30 p. m. 
Call them tonight 




HOLDS WORLDS RECORD 

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GAZETTE /TELEGRAPH 

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Combination 
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Coburn Library 

COLORADO COLLEGE 

Colorado Springs, Colorado 
Fully accredited Co-educational 

Adequate equipment and high standards of scholastic attainment 
makes Colorado College one of the outstanding Liberal Arts Col- 
leges of the country. 

A large faculty makes possible an individual friendly guidance 
for each student. 

Thorough and interesting courses in the Schools of ARTS and 
SCIENCES, LETTERS and FINE ARTS, the NATURAL SCI- 
ENCES, and the SOCIAL SCIENCES develop his mind in prep- 
aration for purposeful effective living in the modern world. 

Unsurpassed climate, beautiful environment and the influence of 
a cultured community combine to make study at COLORADO 
COLLEGE a privilege. 

C. B. HERSHEY, A. M., ED. D., Acting President 




eMyBTINGref 



f 



<f 



V 



V 



It is always a satisfaction to teachers and administra- 
tive officers of the college to welcome new students to the 
campus and to their classes. It is a further pleasure to 
greet again students with whom we have formerly been 
associated. 

The college year promises to be a most delightful and 
helpful one in every respect, and this note is to assure the 
members of the student body that every effort will be made 
to advance them in their work in the classroom and in 
every worthy activity of the campus. This is an invitation 
to the students to call upon the members of the faculty and 
the several officers of the college for any aid or informa- 
tion they may be able to give. 

C. B. HERSHEY, 

Dean and Acting President. 



^ 



^ 



J 



J 



Issued eacH week during the academic year. Entered at the'ost Office at Colorado Springs as Second-Class Matter. 



THE TIGER 



Friday, September 22, 1933 



its a ljut/p good Cigarette 




SO FAR as I can tell . . . 
and I've smoked a lot 
of them . . . CHESTER- 
FIELDS are always the 
same. They have a pleas- 
ing taste and aroma. 

I smoke 'em before 
breakfast and after dinner. 
I smoke 'em when I'm 
working. I smoke 'em 
when I'm resting. And al- 
ways they satisfy. They 
suit me right down to the 
ground. 



a 



tA& ci&are/te itiatb milder 
tne^ ci&arette tnat tastes better 




Quality "Master" Cleaners Tigers Always Welcome 

Only one Quality and the P A Y T O N STUDIO! THE GOLDEN CYCLE 



WE DO SUPERIOR WORK 
FOR THE SAME PRICE 



Price is uniform 

The Place for Good Photography 
H. A. Thompson Prices and Styles for Every Purse 

Mail! I -8-1 -I 10 E. Kiowa 30 S. Tejon over Robbins on the Corner 



SHINE PARLOR 

GOLDEN CYCLE BUILDING 

HntB (leaned and Hlockcd 

TODD COLBERT, Prop. 



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WELCOME TIGERS 

HARRY'S 
BARBER SHOP 

and 

SIMONSON'S 
BEAUTY SALON 

Newest Art in Permanent Waving 
$2.50 and up. 



27 E. Platte 



Main 4392 



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W. I. LUCAS 

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GOODS— 

"Tigers Always Welcome" 

120 North Tejon Street 
Main 900 



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We Solicit Your Patronage 



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Colorado Springs, Colo. 

Phone Main 1288 



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Reward's 

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Bi Shop 



19 East Bijou Street 



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To Maintain 
A Payroll in 
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COAL 

Phone Main 577 



THE TIGER 



VOLUME XXXVI 



COLORADO COLLEGE WEEKLY NEWS-MAGAZINE 



Number 1 



♦ e A M P u 



Activities 

were stressed as a means of fur- 
thering educational advantages at 
COLORADO COLLEGE Thursday 
morning in assembly as Dr. C. B. 
Hershey made his first address as 
Dean and Acting President of 
COLORADO COLLEGE. 




DR. C. B. HERSHEY 

Author, professor, scholar. 

President Hershey is the author 
of articles on universities and uni- 
versity extension in Nelson's En- 
clycopaedia and of other articles on 
education in educational religious 
periodicals. With this background 
he is well fitted for his present post. 

Dr. Hershey is a member of Phi 
Delta Kappa, honorary education 
fraternity for men; of the Rocky j 
Mountain Harvard club, of which 
he was president in 1927 and 1928; 
regional correspondent of the ! 
Graduate School of Education, 
Harvard university; a member of | 
the Colorado Schoolmasters club, 
the Colorado-Wyoming Academy of 
Science, and the Winter Night club 
of Colorado Springs. 



Delta Alpha Phi 

won permanent possession of the 
inter-fraternity council scholastic 
cup by winning highest honors for 
grade average for the third time in 
five years. Average for the embryo 
Lambda Chi Alpha chapter was 
80.504 for the year of 1932-33. 

Other averages of the frater- 
nities were Kappa Sigma, 77.489; 
Phi Gamma Delta, 77.357; Sigma 
Chi. 76.503; Phi Delta Theta, 
76.075; Pi Kappa Alpha, 75.834; 
Beta Theta Pi, 75.256. 



Precedent Cracks 

The Chemistry department of 
COLORADO COLLEGE announces 
that the largest class in organic 
chemistry ever to be enrolled in the 
college is meeting this year. Ap- 
proximately 30 students are en- 
rolled. 



Best Season Ever 

was predicted Wednesday for 
Koshare of COLORADO COLLEGE 
by John Craig, president of the or- 
ganization when interviewed by the 
representative of the TIGER. "We 
have better material, shows with 
bigger prospects, and a wealth of 
interest the like of which has never 
been manifest in dramatics before 
at this early period in the school 
year." 

Koshare will present four major 
productions in addition to the twen- 
ty-fifth anniversary presentation of 
the Christmas pageant-play, "Eager 
Heart." Announcement will be 
made later of the entire schedule 
of shows. 

Of especial interest to new 
COLORADO COLLEGE students is 
the first show of the year which is 
cast for the most part of entirely 
new students wishing to break into 
dramatics. The production this 
year is "The Damsel in Distress," a 
hilarious comedy authored by Ian 
May and P. G. Wodehouse. Try- 
outs for this show will be held 
Wednesday and Thursday, Sept. 
27-28 at 4 p. m. at Cogswell the- 
atre in Bemis Hall. 

Koshare is an organization made 
up of those interested in the drama 
and its many associate activities. 
Membership is open to anyone sub- 
ject to approval of work done in 
connection with dramatic produc- 
tions. One of the new undertakings 
of the organization this year will 
be a road show which will bill sev- 
eral performances during spring 
vacation. All who are interested in 
any phase of dramatics are urged 
to be present at the tryouts next 
week. 

COLORADO COLLEGE students 
are luckv in having access to the 
entire bill of five performances for 
one dollar. Season tickets may be 
had for this amount from executive 
board members of Koshare. Emma 
Louisa Jordan is in charge of sales 
at present. The sale of season tick- 
ets will cease after the first-night 
performance of the freshman pro- 
duction. 



Head Tactician 

is the official title voted Frances- 
ca Hall by the Associated Women 
Students as this organization m?de 
p'ans this week for the welcoming 
cf new women students to COLO- 
RADO COLLEGE. Tactician Hall 
will have student assistants aiding 
her in the business of making new 
additions to the student body feel 
at home. 



Delta Alpha Phi Granted 
National Charter 

Delta Alpha Phi, the only local 
fraternity on the COLORADO 
COLLEGE campus has been grant- 
ed a charter of Lambda Chi Al- 
pha, national social fraternity. 

Delta Alpha Phi's petition for a 
charter, which was granted at the 
national convention of Lambda Chi 
in Chicago during August was the 
first petition ever granted by a 
unanimous vote. 

Lambda Chi Alpha was founded 
at Boston university Nov. 2, 1909, 
being an outgrowth of the Cosmo- 
politan Law club. National head- 
quarters are 701 Circle Tower, In- 
dianapolis, Ind. 

The fraternity badge is a pearl- 
set crescent with the horns turned 
toward the left, enclosing a mono- 
gram of the Greek letters, "Lamb- 
da Chi Alpha." The center of the 
crescent bears the secret Greek let- 
ters, "Delta Pi," in gold on black 
enamel. Colors of the fraternity 
are purple, green and gold: the 
flower, the violet. The pledge but- 
ton is an intricate design of the 
Greek letters, "Lambda Chi Alpha," 
in black and gold. 

Delta Alpha Phi, whose house is 
at 1015 North Nevada avenue, was 
organized here as a local fraternity 
in the fall of 1924, being given rec- 
ognition by the inter-fraternity 
council at Colorado college on No- 
vember 1 7, the day the public an- 
nouncement of its founding was 
made. There were 18 charter mem- 
bers. 

Since its inception at COLO- 
RADO COLLEGE it has striven for 
excellence in scholarship. In the 18 
semesters since its organization the 
fraternity has ranked first in schol- 
arship eleven times; second, five 
times; third, once; and fourth, 
once. 

Formal installation ceremonies 
will be held in Shove Memorial 
chapel, probably on December 9. 
National officers of Lambda Chi and 
undergraduate members of other 
Colorado chapters will come here to 
witness the installation. 

Faculty members of Delta Alpha 
Phi are Pres. C. B. Hershey and 
Prof. F. M. Okey. The Officers are 
Wallace Peck of Grand Junction, 
president; Miller H. Stroup of Colo- 
rado Springs, vice president; Roger 
Arnold of Colorado Springs, secre- 
tary; J. Sherburne Ayers, Littleton, 
treasurer. 

The chapter at Colorado college 



Au Revoir 

In a surprise announcement dur- 
ing the initial chapel hour of t h e 
school year, President Mierow bade 
farewell to COLORADO COLLEGE 
students and his many friends in 
Colorado Springs and early Wednes- 
day left overland for New York 
City from whence he will proceed to 
Rome for a year's study in the 
classic arts. 




CHARLES C. MIEROW 
"Goodbye, Good Luck - - " 

Dr. Mierow will spend the ensu- 
ing year in study, traveling thru 
most of Europe before his return 
to Colorado Springs late in August. 

In closing his farewell address 
Dr. Mierow said, "My happiness at 
the prospect of the fulfillment of a 
long cherished ambition — the op- 
portunity of study in my own field 
at Rome — is, not unnaturally 
tinged with regret at my separation 
from my friends here in the College 
and in Colorado Springs. I wish 
you all success and happiness in 
your work during the coming year 
and look forward with keen antici- 
pation to a resumption of my du- 
ties upon my return." 



Lost Ring 

A ring was lost the past week in 
Shove Memorial chapel which can 
be of little value to the finder. It 
was an old fashioned tiffnay setting 
in white gold with three fire opals 
and four small diamonds. It's in- 
trinsic value is small but it has great 
sentimental value because of fam- 
ily connections. A reward is offered 
to the person finding it or for in- 
formation leading to its return. 
Drop information in Tiger box in 
Coburn Library building. 



will be the fourth chapter of Lamb- 
da Chi Alpha in Colorado. The 
other chapters are: Alpha Pi at 
University of Denver, Gamma Pi at 
Colorado Agricultural college, and 
Gamma Mu at University of Colo- 
rado. 



THE TIGER 



Friday, September 22, 1933 



t 
s' to 




A. A. DEGREES 



Acting Editor LEW CROSBY 

Business Manager EVERETT STAPLETON 



^Cherrio 

to President Mierow and to his family as they start upon a year of 
travel. We have enjoyed the associations engendered by their pleasing 
personalities and rejoice with Dr. Mierow at the prospect of being able 
to continue his chosen studies in ancient Rome, the cradle of classic art. 
His quiet smile, his unremitting labor in behalf of COLORADO COL- 
LEGE, and his democratic spirit have left a host of friends who wish a 
hearty "Bon Voyage," a pleasant year in study and travel, and a speedy 
reUirn to COLORADO COLLEGE. 

^Greetings 

to Dr. C. B. Hershey with every wish for a successful administra- 
tion during the ensuing school year. This office wishes to emphasize the 
respect and esteem with which Dr. Hershey is held by the members of 
te COLORADO COLLEGE student body and to offer the fullest coopera- 
tion in making the year 1933-34 one of constructive accomplishment, 
with mutual advantages both to acting President Hershey and to the 
student body of COLORADO COLLEGE. Carry on. 

^Freshman Students 

To you who hold the future of COLORADO COLLEGE within your 
grasp, we extend the right hand of fellowship. You are entering upon 
the happiest, most carefree period of your college career. The days that 
today seem filled with strange surroundings and new environment are 
but stepping stones to a fellowship which most of you will share for 
the next four years. That fellowship means much to you and even more 
to us. Your success and happiness while members of the student body 
the COLORADO COLLEGE student body and to offer the fullest coopera- 
carry on the good work of keeping COLORADO COLLEGE the finest 
school in the Rocky Mountain region. A greeting, and an obligation. 
Good luck. 




tftt 

Barbara iHtrrmu 




Associate in arts degrees were 
presented to 105 members of last 
year's sophomore class at the first 
chapel exercises to be held in Shove 
chapel Tuesday. Those who have 
completed the required work for the 
A. A. degree are: 

Adams, Ruth Elizabeth, Colorado 
Springs; Andrews, Stephen Gabriel, 
Walsenburg, Colo.; Arnold, Roger 
Charles, Colorado Springs; Ayres, 
Joseph Sherburne, Littletn, Coolo. 

Beach, Richard Booth, Water- 
town, Conn.; Berry, Paul Dwight, 
Colorado Springs; Bennett, Billie, 
Albuquerque, N. M.; Bernard, Gil- 
bert Cress, Colorado Springs; Bo- 
hon, John Graham, Manitou, Colo.; 
Brooks, Richard Ensign, Colorado 
Springs; Burnham, Janet Mary, 
Colorado Springs. 

Chilcott, Carl Thomas, Colorado 
Springs; Cochrane, John Preston, 
Colorado Springs; Corrin, Joseph 
Benjamin, Jr., Colorado Springs; 
Costello, Albert Anthony, Salida, 
Colo.; Crawford, Ruth Tillinghast, 
Colorado Springs; Crosby, Lewis 
Clayton, Oklahoma City, Okla. 

Davis, Clyde Webster, Pueblo, 
Colo.; Day, John Arthur, Colorado 
Springs; Dentan, Helen Marilla, 
Colorado Springs; Derby, George 
Jerome, Hastings, Nebr. ; Dewing, 
Charles Edward, Colorado Springs; 
Dorlac, Mary Leona, Colorado 
Springs. 

Ebeling, Ray Clark, Colorado 
Springs; Edward, Robert Emery, 
Colorado Springs; Effinger, Cecil 
Stanley, Colorado Springs; Engel, 
Harriet Blanche, Colorado Springs. 

Fisher, Mary Henderson. Colo- 
rado Springs; Foster, Elizabeth 
Edith, Montrose, Colo-; Fowler, 
Lindsay Baker. Harrisville, W. Va.; 
Frantz, Phyllis Lucelia, Pueblo, 
Colo.; Fuquay, Edna Mae. Everett, 
Washington. 

Garrett, Norma May, Colorado 
Springs; Gill, Audrey Corlett, Colo- 
rado Springs; Gilmore. Helen, Colo- 
rado Springs; Gray, John William, 
Spring Green, Wis.; Grimwood, Al- 
fred Ernest, Colorado Springs. 

Hall, Francesca Tudor, Colorado 
Springs; Harrison, Richard Knight, 
Colorado Springs; Heaton, Eliza- 
betht Jean, Pueblo, Colo.; Hed- 
bloom, Earland Everett, Colorado 
Springs; Heinicke. Alfred Franz, 
Colorado Springs; Hibbard, Donald 
Ayers, Colorado Springs; Hiskey, 
Edith Pearl, Colorado Springs; 
Hoag, Mary Jessie, Colorado 
Springs; Howell, John R. Graves, 
Colorado Springs; Huff, Don Henry, 
Colorado Springs. 

Johnson, Caroline Louise, Colo- 
rado Springs; Jordan, Emma- 
Louise, Colorado Springs. 

Kearney, Harriette M i c h a e 1 a, 



Colorado Springs; Kelly, Robert 
Salmons, New York, N. Y.; Killian, 
Ann Magdaline, Colorado Springs. 

Lagerborg, Dorothy Louise, Colo- 
rado Springs; Larson, Wilbur Hen- 
dricks, Colorado Springs; Lee, Rob- 
ert Pierce, Colorado Springs; Lewis, 
Frances Imogene, Colorado 
Springs; Little, Edward, Colorado 
Springs; Livingston, John Arthur, 
Colorado Springs; Lowe, Joseph, 
Pueblo, Colo. 

McCoy, Mary Margaret, Colorado 
Springs; Mansfield, Mary Grace, 
Colorado Springs; Markley, Charles 
Sidney, Jasper, Tex.; Miller, Ellis 
Swartsel, Colorado Springs; Miller, 
Karlton Bethel, Colorado Springs; 
Mitchell, L. Isabel, Colorado 
Springs; Moshisky, Janet, Montrose, 
Colorado. 

Ostdiek, Aelred Francis, Colorado 
Springs. 

Pachak, Anne Elizabeth, Pueblo, 
Colo.; Paterson, Thomas George, 
Jr., Larkspur, Colo.; Pelsor, Gene 
Thomas, Colorado Springs; Perkins, 
Joe Gish, Colorado Springs; Per- 
kins, Van Kirk Brigham, Colorado 
Springs; Piatt, Elizabeth Aurella, 
Alamosa, Colo-; Poley, Linn Swart- 
ley, Colorado Springs; Polley, 
James Elihu, Glen Karn, Ohio. 

Rasor, Robert William, Pueblo, 
Colo.; Rayner, Elizabeth Mary, 
Lake Forest, 111.; Reid, Margaret 
Ward, Colorado Springs; Richert, 
Paul Jerome, Colorado Springs; 
Riddell, John Tate, Jr., Evanstown, 
111.; Roberts, Jane Fisher, Colorado 
Springs; Robinson, Florence Car- 
ver, Lexington, Mass.; Robinson, 
George Franklin, Colorado Springs; 
Rohrer, Mary Katherine, Colorado 
Springs; Rothrock, Nancy Alice, 
Colorado Springs; Runyan, Damon 
Ogden, Scottsbluff, Nebr.; Ryerson, 
Stanley Barton, Denver, Colorado. 

Simpson, Reed Morgan, Monroe, 

La.; Sims, John Arthur, Colorado 
Springs; Skidmore, Marka Doro- 
thy, Colorado Springs; Skjoldahl, 
Martha Ragna, Colorado Springs; 
Smith, Bruce Donald, Jr., Colorado 
Springs; Smith, Gerald Howard, 
Colorado Springs; Stannard, Ken- 
neth Edwin, Denver, Colorado. ; 
Swan, Claron McKean, Salt Lake 
City, Utah; Swartz, Lucile Fern, 
Pueblo. Colo.; Swem, Charles Ed- 
ward, Colorado Springs. 

Trimble, Malvina Ellyn, Colorado 
Springs; Twitchell, Raleigh Norris, 
Colorado Springs. 

Walberg, Lillian Adelaide, Colo- 
rado Springs; Walker, Jane, Colo- 
rado Springs; Weaver, Edith, Colo- 
rado Springs; Willett, Niel, Colo- 
rado Springs; Wolfe, Roy Crain, 
Tonopah, Nevada. 

Zuhlke, Helen Hilda, Littleton, 
Colorado. 



Friday, September 22, 1933 



THE TIGER 



Winners 

Marjorie Avalon, '36, rhymed 
her way to first prize in the Evelyn 
May Bridges poetry contest which 
was held under the auspices of the 
English department last year. Al- 
fred Grimwood, '35, received sec- 
ond prize. 

Miss Avalon's contribution, for 
which $25 was awarded, consisted 
of a series of sonnets. Grimwood 
submitted a descriptive poem en- 
titled, "The Game of Chess." His 
prize rmounted to $15. 

Every year the English depart- 
ment awards these prizes for worth- 
while poetry. The awards are giv- 
en in the memory of the late Mrs. 
Evelyn May Bridges by her hus- 
band. 



College Men 
prefer 

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Cord 
Trousers 



They are 
college styled 
and how 
they wear 



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newest designs and ideas in 
these splendid Fountain Pens 
— and Pencils. 

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see which fits your hand best. 

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NOTICES 
The School of Music is open for 
consultation and registration daily, 
from 9:30-12 and 2-4:30. Piano 
students needing financial aid may 
see Dean Hale. The School Office 
is room 10, Perkins Hall. 



Hulbert of COLORADO COL- , Histor y and 1 tl ) e , L wer Public Li 



Please notify the Secretary's of- 
fice at once if you have moved 
since registration. We want all ad- 
dresses as accurate as possible for 
the Student Directory. 



Sponsors and sponsor captains! 
Have you forgotten? Of course you 
haven't, but just in case you may 
have - - - the tea dance for spon- 
sors, sponsor captains, and spon- 
sees mil take place this afternoon 
in Bemis Hall from 3:30 to 5:30. 
Don't Forget! And this for you, 
new coed — if you by any chance 
have not come in contact with your 
sponsor, come to Bemis this after- 
noos and meet her. 



All applications for editor of the 
Tiger will have applications with 

Jack Lawson before Saturday night. 

••• •«• ••• 

Will the person who borrowed 
the typewriter from the journalism 
room in Montgomery Hall please 
return it immediately. This machine 

is needed at once for class use. 

••• .*. ••• 

The School of Music will sponsor 
an operetta to be given in late No- 
vember under the direction of 
Fanny A. Tucker, Instructor in 
Voice and Singing, Room 1, Perkins 
Hall, and Maria Fielding, Instruc- 
tor in the Dance, Room 15, Perkins 
Hall. Tryouts for all voices and 
dancers will be he£d Monday, Tues- 
day and Wednesday afternoons at 
these studios. 

...Telephones, Main 4347-W, Main 
285, Main 4706-J. 



CHAPEL CALENDAR 
Sunday, Sept. 24, 4 p. m. Vesper 
services 

The rnnual COLORADO COL- 
LEGE Sunday will be observed with 
a service given for the college by 
the First Congregational church. 
The services were formerly held at 
the church, but will be held at 
Shove Memorial chapel, with mem- 
bers of the faculty and students in- 
vited to attend. Rev. Charles Staf- 
ford Brown will be the speaker. 
There will be special music by the 
chrpel choir. 

Tuesday, Sept. 26, 10 a. m. Chapel 
service 

The sDeaker for the occasion will 
be the Rev. W. R. Medzie, D. D., 
Secretary of Educational Institu- 
tions for the Congregational Church 
in America. 



New Book 

"Overland to the Pacific" is the 
title of the second volume in the 
series of publications on western 
history edited by Dr. Archer B. 



LEGE. 

Under the general title of "South- 
west on the Turquoise Trail" the 
Stewart Commission on Western 



brary are publishir he diaries of 
early travelers on - r inta Fe 
trail. These volumes contain ma- 
terial that has never before been 
published in comprehensive form. 



Subscribe NOW for The 



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Friday, September 22, 1933 



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Groceries, Meats,Fruits 

WE APPRECIATE YOUR BUSINESS 



Phone 2602 
123 N. Tejon 



KNORR/S 

Market 



MEET ME 

AT 

McRae's 

RESTAURANT 

105 Phone 

Pikes Peak M. 5300 



Fresh Frosh 

cast perspiring glances over the 
yearly intelligence barometers held 
each year at Palmer hall and won- 
dered if, after all, college was the 
good time it was cracked up to be. 
Three hours later calloused profs 
opened wondering eyes at the ap- 
parent mentality of future COLO- 
RADO COLLEGE studes. The av- 
erage grade of the 1933-34 COLO- 
RADO COLLEGE freshman ranks 
the class among the best in the na- 
tion scholastically. 

First-year students who distin- 
guished themselves by attaining av- 
erages of from 90 to 97 follow: 

1 . Charles H. Strang, Colorado 
Springs High School. 

2. Herbert F. Newhall, Colorado 
Springs High School. 

3. Kenneth C. Rule, University 
of Chicago. 

4. Muriel Hess, South Denver 
High School. 

5. Mary W. Hyatt, Centennial 
High School. 

6. Robert M. Tabley, Colorado 
Agricultural College. 

7. Gilmore B. Hersom, Colorrdo 
Springs High School. 

8. Betty Predovitch, Joliet Jun- 
ior College. 

9. Dori* Shock, Colorado 
Springs High School. 

10. 'Edward O'Neil, Colorado 
Springs High School. 

1 1. Merlin Pete, Colorado 
Springs High School. 

12. Margaret Kelley, Colorado 
Springs High School. 

Prof. William A. B'akeley, who 
was in charge of the tests, states 
that the records are equrl to those 
f past years. 



twnmmun tuninm n t mnnnmntm 



New Aims For A. W. S. 

The annual fall conference of the 
Associated Women Students was 
held at Chipita lodge, Chipita park 
September 12 and 13. Tuesday 
evening the A. W. S. had as their 
guests President and Mrs. C. C. 
Mierow. Prof, and Mrs. R. J. Gil- 
more. Mr. and Mrs. Lloyd Shaw 
and Mrs. Louise W. Fauteaux. 
Members of the A. S. C. C. attend- 
ing were Don Glidden, Virginia 
Berser. Fred Miles and Ed Little. 

Mr. Shaw, who was the speaker 
of the evening, pointed out many 
different plans which would not 
onlv benefit A. W. S. but also 
COLORADO CO' LEGE in general. 

A. W. S. for C. C. was the new 
motto adopted. Under this slogan 
A. W. S. will try to carry forth its 
new aims. There will be an effort 
made for men and women students 
to participate in the same activities, 
a more mutual understanding be- 
tween the faculty and student body 
and to establish more social con- 
tacts between sorority and indepen- 
dent women. 



Friday, September 22, 1933 



THE TIGER 



PORT 



| ^a 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 r 1 1 M 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 M 1 1 1 1 i 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 II I M 1 1 1 M 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 M 1 1 1 r 1 1 < I M 1 1 1 i 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 M 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 M I ■ I ■ I ■ 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 i 1 1 1 1 1 M 1 1 1 1 1 1 M 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1,^9 



The First Roar 

of the COLORADO COLLEGE 
Tiger was heard September 10 as 
a snarling pack of 28 reported to 
ringmaster "Bully" Van de Graaff 
and his assistants, "Spick" Spicer 
and Art Gray. Conditioning, per- 
fection in plays and fundamentals 
were stressed during the first week, 
in developing an offense which will 
click in the Teachers game, Sept. 

29. 

The squad, though handicapped 
by its lack of numbers has plenty 
of quality, and with the traditional 
never-say-die Tiger spirit should go 
places this year. 

With but one week remaining be- 
fore the Greeley game, "Bully" is 
polishing his charges into a snappy, 
fast charging aggregation. The 
Bears appear to be the dark horse 
of the conference and it is rumored 
that they have a formidable array 
of baii luggers. 

At present writings, Creager 
would appear to have the inside 
track for calling signals. Roach and 
Grifhith will probablv do the kick- 
ing. The other backfield positions 
will probably be filled by Funk and 
Beery. In the line LeMaster and 
Bernard look good at the ends, 
Swan and Andrews at tackles and 
Mihalick and either Carlson, Bick- 
nell or Winters at Guards. With a 
second squad of huskies nearly 
equal to the above named, COLO- 
RADO COLLEGE should be in the 
money. 

The game schedule: 

Sept. 29 — Teachers at Greeley. 

Oct. 7 — Wyoming here. 

Oct. 20— N. M. Normal here. 

Nov. 4— C. U. at Boulder. 

Nov. 11— B. Y. U. here (home- 
coming). 

Nov. 18 — Mines here. 

Nov. 25 — Aggies at Denver. 

Menu 

W. A. A. has outlined its sports 
schedule for the coming year. 
Events listed are: Tennis from 
September 25-October 25 under 
Eleanor Hastings' leadership; Tena- 
quoit from September 25-October 
25 under Norma Garrett; Basket- 
ball from November 1 -December 1 
under Betty Platte; Shuffleboard 
from November 1 -December 1 un- 
der Norma Garrett; Swimming un- 
der Clara Haeker — all the first se- 
mester; winter sports through De- 
cember and February; Baseball 
from April 1-May 1 under Helen 
Dentan; the May Fete in May; 
Hiking for all year; and Archery 
during the Fall and Spring under 
the leadership of Helen Margaret 
Shaw. Any woman may become a 
member of W. A. A- by participat- 
ing in one of these sports. 



Frosh 

Twenty-three freshmen have re- 
ported for football under the guid- 
ing eyes of Ray Fries and Owen 
Owens, ex-varsity stars. All indica- 
tions point toward an exceptionally 
fine team, as their number is gen- 
erously sprinkled with prep stars. In 
the line we find such notables as 
Mclntyre, all state end from Ft. 
Collins, and Cool and Riley of C. S. 
H. S. Jay Schoyer a transfer from 
Kansas U. and a former star tackle 
there, should make history here. 
Red Schwartz a Pueble Centenial 
speedster and Vincent Young a 
triple threat from Kansas, are prom- 
ising backfield stars. 

Conditioning has been the feature 
of the week, with a few light scrim- 
ages in preparation for a tangle with 
the varsity tomorrow morning. 

The remaining Cub roster and a 
schedule of their games follows: 

Frank Von Steege of Alamosa; 
Wayne Meil, Fort Collins; Harold 
Haines and Kenneth Hall of Den- 
ver; Dick Alderson, Withers Cool, 
Jim Mclntyre, Curtis Perryman, Jim 
Riley, Norman Trainor, John John- 
son, Marcus Shivers, Hobart Corn- 
ing, Kenneth Deppen, Russell Van 
Skike, Jimmy Roberts, Tom Dilling- 
ham, Howard Dostal, Willis Arm- 
strong, Grant Lester, all of Colo- 
rado Springs. 

The Tiger Cubs play only two 
games this season. The first is with 
the D. U. Yearlings at Denver on 
Oct. 27- On Thanksgiving day they 
meet Mines frosh, here. 



Denver's Flood Area 

served as a background for an 
exciting return trip for the board 
members of W. A. A. who were 
guests of Miss Marion Fezer at her 
cabin "Rockhurst-on-the-Poudre" 
the week-end of September 8. 

Enioyable events numbered dur- 
ing the four days' outing included 
fireplace pow-wows at which new 
elections took place and plans for 
the future year discussed, an all- 
dav hike to Lake Agnes, and a val- 
uable exchange of ideas with Miss 
Elizabeth Forbes, Miss Ruth Prout, 
and Miss Bertha Smith, all mem- 
bers of the Women's Physical Edu- 
cation Department at Colorado 
Agricultural College. 

Cross Country 

All men interested in cross coun- 
try will see Jo Irish at once as 
workouts begin immediately. The 
annual inter-fraternity meet will be 
held between the halves of a foot- 
ball game this fall, date to be an- 
nounced later. A tentative dual 
meet with Denver University is 
planned this year. Freshmen are 
eligible. 




C/ie one and only 

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8 



THE TIGER 



Friday, September 22, 1933 



AS ADVERTISED IN 
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The Dude From Boston 

was the clever costume chosen 
by Dean Fauteaux at the clever 
supper given last Sunday by the 
W. A. A. in honor of new women 
students at COLORADO COL- 
LEGE. In the costume competition 
Mary Jo Sparkman as the "Hotcha 
Maiden From Honolulu" wiggled in 
for first honors. Jane Wahtola, 
wearing a replica of Mae West's 
"hourglass" and Louise Arens as 
"The Lille French Maid" furnished 
serious competition. 

Norm? Garrett headed the invi- 
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Department Store 



Neophytes 

"When the smoke of the battle 
cleared" the four Greek letter wom- 
en fraternities announced the Fall 
pledging of the following girls: 

Beta Delta of Delta Gamma: 
Betty Anderson, Fort Morgan; 
Susan Braerton, Denver; Jean 
Carney, Greeley; Adelaide Dix- 
on, Pueblo; Virginia Graham, 
Denver; Pauline Hoopes, 
Colorado Springs; Martha Frances 
Howell, Colorado Springs; Caro- 
lyn Hurley, Clayton, N. M.; Jean 
James, Denver; Ruth Liverman, 
Denver; Helen Meinholtz, Colorado 
Springs; Wilhelmina Meinholtz, 
Colorado Springs; Ellen Louise 
Perry, Denver; Virginia Thornton, 
Colorado Springs; Helen Walker, 
Denver; Dorothy Weaver, Colorado 
Springs; Imogene Young, Pueblo. 

Beta Omega of Kappa Alpha 
Theta pledged the following; Gra- 
tia Adams, Brookline, Mass.; Eliza- 
beth Chaney, Denver; Ann Espe, 
Santa Fe, N. M.; Anne Florey, 
Colorado Springs; Lucile Hampton, 
Monte Vista; Ruth Anne Johnson, 
Denver; Miriam Rothgerber. Den- 
ver; Martha Louise Statton. Monte 
Vista; Ruth Mary Webster, Denver. 

The pledges of Alpha Phi of 
Gamma Phi Beta are: Mary Eliza- 
beth Figge, Silver Cliff; Muriel 
Hess, Denver; Helen McCandish, 
Colorado Springs; Reba Haney, 
Colorado Springs; Betty Reid, Fort 
Morgan: Elizabeth Richter, Den- 
ver; Marguerite Ridge, Colorado 
Springs: Doris Shock, Colorado 
Springs; Virginia Botsford, Monte 
Vista; Elizabeth Dewing, Colorado 
Springs; Barbara Dutton, Pueblo; 
I uzilla Eubank, Colorado Springs; 
Edith Southard. Greeley; Bertha 
Trotter, Colorado Springs; Doris 
Wylvie, Denver; Esther Alexander, 
Burlington, Colo. 

Delta Zeta of Kappa Kappa 
Gamma plecfce the following: Lucy 
Blackman, Tulsa. Okla.; Martha 
Jane Blackman, Colorado Springs; 
Mary Gilmore, Colorado Springs; 



Carrie Coed's Letters 

Dear Sis: 

Rush week is over and we can 
all settle down now to pursuing the 
elusive education, but I must tell 
you about some of the parties. 

Friday noon I tripped forth to a 
Delta Gamma cabaret luncheon at 
their chapter house. They had 
small tables all around the room 
with decorations and flowers in 
their colors of bronze, pink and 
blue. Dancing occupied us all be- 
tween courses, with a grand floor 
show during the main course. There 
were some very cute tap numbers, 
a solo dance, and some blues from 
Marian MacMillan. Dodo Skidmore 
lent color and atmosphere by play- 
ing cigarette girl in a very realistic 
manner. 

Kappa entertained us Saturday 
afternoon at a Bohemian tea in 
Tabor Utley's studio. Such atmo- 
sphere — checked table cloths, can- 
dles in bottles, menus to order 
from, 'n everything. Betty Britain 
handed us stage money as we en- 
tered, and we found all manner of 
ways to lose it upstairs. During the 
afternoon someone cut our silhou- 
ettes and Lorna Dorlac told our 
fortunes. Dot Chamberlin passed 
cigarettes, looking very Bohemian 
in attire. It was great fun. 

From this we rushed to a Theta 
party at Mrs. Sinclair's home in 
Broadmoor. It was a dinner, in the 
hotel manner. We continually re- 
ceived wires and telegrams during 
the course of the evening. A fash- 
ion show was presented after din- 
ner. Four girls modeled the new 
fall fashions. We loved it. Songs 
completed the evening. 

The "House of Fu Manchu" was 
entered Sunday afternoon at t h e 
Gamma Phi house. We ate Chinese 
food in a Chinese manner with Chi- 
nese decorations all around us. It 
was so cute — chop sticks, chop 
suey and queer coolies and candies, 
we had our fortunes told later. 

All in all, what with many other 
parties just as clever and nice, rush 
week was a whirl. Now all I need 
is a bid to one of them to be per- 
fectly happy. 

See you soon, and look hopefully 
for a pledge button. 

Yours in a rush, 

CARRIE. 




nnouncing 



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Where ever you go you will fine 
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Main 398 
A Cheese Sandwich and 

a Stein of Beer — ISC'* 



Friday, September 22, 1933 



THE TIGER 



Paddles Will Swing 

on 80 hopeful pledges of COLO- 
RADO COLLEGE fraternities whose 
debut in the social whirl was made 
in pledging Saturday night. Buttons 
were distributed to representatives 
of every section of the United 
States, listing California on the 
west and Massachusetts on the east. 

Pledges announced by Kappa 
Sigma were George Fisher, Edward 
McRea, Norman Traynor, Jake 
Johnson, George Miller, Kennth 
Deppen, Frank von Steeg, Raymond 
Price, William Tudor, Thomas 
Ross, Russ van Shyke and Irving 
Roberts. 

Sigma Chi neophytes numbered 
John Dickey, Curtis Perryman, 
James Riley, George Clamp, Rich- 
ard Alderson, Herbert Conzen, Jim 
Roberts, Robert Stagg, Loring 
Lennox, Tom Mclntyre, Wayne 
Neil, Maxwell Frick, Charles Mc- 
Donald, and George Villars. 

In Phi Gamma Delta's pledge 
group were Harold Packard, Rob- 
ert Razor, Willis Armstrong, Bud 
Alston, Jack Green, Dick Alston, 
Jim Ranson, Hoeart Corning, Jim 
Mclntyre, Jack Murray, Marcus 
Shivers, Bob Walsh, Charles Woess- 
ner, Bill Frey, Vincent Young, Jay 
Shreyer, Owen Wright, Joe Rustin, 
and Joe Hardwick. 

Phi Delta Theta pledged Fritz 
Baker, Bud Udick, Bert Price, Carl 
Swartz, Dudley Bruce, Kenny Hall, 
Otis Elliot, Russell Lohnbakken, 
Ted Knecht, Gilmore Hersom, Bud 
McMahon, Howard Dostal and 
Charles Dewing. 

Beta Theta Pi: Withers Cool, 
William Paddock, Stanley Reid, 
Herbert Dorricott, Edward O'Neil, 
William Sode, Gene Gustavson, 
James Walsh, Wilmer Hemming, 
Charles Webb, Roy Wolfe, Tom Dil- 
Jlingham, Ronald Rolph, Dave Bak- 
|er, Harrison Lee, and Lee Gross. 

Delta Alpha Phi : Bill Davis, Gil- 
bert Verba, Bob Hay ward, Richard 
Jones, Bob Glew, and Paul House. 



A Typwriter 

— an Aid to Education 

The investment is small — 
payment as low as $4.00 a 
month may be made — and we 
carry every make machine. 



The 

Typewriter 

Man 




sti 



125 N. Tejon St. 
Phone Main 95 



wmni iii n i i i n niiiii n iiii inniinnmi 



JVlucli lias teen printed 
about tobacco 



"cool" "burns slowly" 
"doesn't smoke hot" "don't bite" 

And all of these things can be 
said about Granger — the tobacco 
that's made to smoke in a pipe. 

Granger is made of White 
Burley Tobacco — it's made by 
Wellman's Method, the right 
process — it's packed right. Folks 
seem to like fr- 



et sensible package 
10 cents 





ranger Rough Cut 

_the tobacco that's MADE FOR PIPES 



© 1933, Liggett & Mybrs Tobacco Co. 



IRA C. DUGAN 

Jeweler and Optometrist 

Fine Watch and Clock Repairing 

Eyes Examined — Glasses Fitted 

— Lenses Duplicated — 

Phone Main 1702-J 9 N. Tejon St. 



IPol>l>ege9 

^ "INN" 

ACROSS FROM MURRAY'S 



CANDIES AND NUTS 
FOR ALL OCCASIONS 

HUGHES 
CANDY SHOP 

128 N. TEJON 



THE TIGER 




Friday, September 22, 1933 



OF THE TOBACCO 
PLANT 



Because . . . 

we use only fine center 
leaves, no stems, no stalks 

We actually discard 86% 
of the tobacco plant. 
Because we use only the 
fine center leaves— no 
stem— no stalk. And each 
Lucky comes to you fully 
packed with ripe, mel- 
low, choice tobaccos- 
round and firm— no loose 
ends. Is it any wonder 
that Luckies are always 
so mild — so smooth? 




ALWAYS thejinest tobaccos 
ALWAYS the finest workmanship 

Always Luchies please! 




: ;-;v:-:-: : : : :-: : --:-::'--"-: *••-.•• • ■ 



H 



.•.v:v; : : : . : : : :v: ; . ; : : : ; : ; :< ; X"-- : ---' 



Copyright. 1933, The American Tobacco Companj. 



"it's toasted 

FOR THROAT PROTECTION- FOR RETTER TASTE 




MUMfeER 6 



Fight ! 






Fight! 




Issued each week during the academic year. Entered at the 'us t Office at Colorado Spring* aa Second-Class Matter. 



THE TIGER 



Friday, September 27, 1933 



Pack Bags 
Laundry Bags 
Hikers Supplies 

THE OUTWEST 

TENT and AWNING CO. 



M. 1261 



18 E. Kiowa 



To Maintain 
A Payroll in 
Colorado Springs 




Phone Main 577 



IIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIMIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIilMIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIII , 

Watch inspectors for C. E. I. & P. Ry. 
and U. P. Ey. 

C.B.LAUTERMAN 

JEWELER and OPTOMETRIST 

FINE 

WATCH — CLOCK 

AND JEWELRY 

REPAIRING 

40 years at 121 North Tejon St. 
Colorado Springs 




I J 1 1 1 1 1 J I > 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 ' r r : 1 1 . 1 1 1 1 r 1 1 . 1 1 j 1 1 1 1 . 1 1 1 1 r J 1 1 1 1 d 1 1 1 1 E 1 1 . 1 1 . : i . I 



Same quality work — 
a real Hair cut for 

PETE'S BARBER SHOP 

8 E. Cucharras 



A Typwriter 

— an Aid to Education 

The investment is small — 
payment as low as $4.00 a 
month may be made — and we 
carry every make machine. 



The 

Typewriter 

Man 



125 N. Tejon St. 
Phone Main 95 




nnnnnnH i mnunii i mn. min i um 



Ww 



at you want 



in your pipe 



... is tobacco that's made to 
smoke in a pipe. This means the 
right kind of leaf tobacco- — the kind 
that grows for pipes. 

It means that it's made right . . . 
and old man Wellman, who taught 
us how to make Granger, knew how. 
It means that it's cut right. 

Just pack Granger good and 
tight in your pipe and strike 
a match. Folks seem to like it. 



a sensible package 
10 cents 





ranger Rough Cut 

_the tobacco that's MADE FOR PIPES 



tft l"!l T ir.rrT-- «■ *«\-ro^ Tnmi < o Co. 



IRA C. DUGAN 

Jeweler and Optometrist 

Fine Watch and Clock Repairing 

Eyes Examined — Glasses Fitted 

— Lenses Duplicated — 



Phone Main I702-J 



9 N. Tejon St. 



Quality "Master" Cleaners 

Only one Quality and the 
Price is uniform 

H. A. Thompson 
Main 1-8-1-1 10 E. Kiowa 



^ "INN" 



ACROSS FROM MURRAY'S 






THE TIGER 



VOLUME XXXVI 



COLORADO COLLEGE WEEKLY NEWS-MAGAZINE 



Number 6 



♦ CAMPTJ 



Persian Visitor 

Mehdi Khan Nakhosteen, native 
of Persia, has been the guest of 
William D. Copeland, secretary of 
COLORADO COLLEGE, during the 
past week. Dr. Nakhosteen has been 
in the United States seven years 
studying. Wooster, Harvard, Co- 
'lumbia, Ohio State and Cornell 
have been attended by him in do- 
ing educational research work. He 
has a doctor's degree from Cornell, 
his thesis being "Persian Educa- 
tion". From Colorado Springs he 
will go to Stanford to do additional 
research work. 

Dr. Nakhosteen is well known in 
Persia. He is a member of the Zo- 
roastrian group. Altho he belongs 
to a prominent family there he has 
been working his way while attend- 
ing school in the United States. He 
is only 26. Mr. Copeland became 
acquainted with him while doing 
graduate work at Harvard. 

Wednesday Dr. Nakhosteen spoke 
to the Comparative Education class. 
He visited Colorado high schools for 
a week and has spoken at several 
Rotary club meetings. 



Alumni Clubs 

COLORADO COLLEGE alumni 
clubs in Pueblo and Denver will 
hold dinner meetings next week in 
connection with the Colorado Edu- 
cational association meetings in the 
two cities. 

The Pueblo meeting will be held 
Thursday, Nov. 2, at the Bluebird 
at 6:30. Spencer Scribner, presi- 
dent, will preside at the meeting. 
Miss Anna Maud Gamett is secre- 
tary and Miss Ruth MacDonald is 
treasurer. 

Friday, Nov. 3, the Denver club 
will meet at the same time at the 
Olin hotel. Peter C. Holm, presi- 
dent of the alumni association, will 
be in charge of the program which 
will include talks by Dr. C. B. Ma- 
[ lone and Dr. C. B. Hershey. Par- 
ents of students now enrolled in the 
college have been invited to attend 
the meting. 



Debate Subject 

Tryouts for debate team will be 
held Monday, Dec. 4, at 4 o'clock. 
The question will be, Resolved: The 
^powers of the president of the 
United States should be substan- 
tially increased as a settled policy. 

Trvouts for extempore speaking 
will be held previous to Christmas 
holidays. The subject: Function of 
education. One man or one woman 
wi'l be chosen to represent the 
school. 

Those wishing; further informa- 
tion should see W. D. Copeland or 
James Arnold. 



Postpone Talk 

Illness in the family of Edward 
'Stanley, '24, chief of the Associ- 
ated Press bureau in Denver, has 
caused the postponement of h i s 
lecture to the journalism classes of 
COLORADO COLLEGE originally 
scheduled for Nov. 2, in Mont- 
gomery hall. 



No Pork on Menu 

We ran over a pig between 
Naples and Rome", Dr. C. C. Mie- 
row wrote to friends here, "but the 
pig got up and ran off, so I guess 
it wasn't badly hurt". The Mierow 
fami'v is having an interesting lime 
in Italy according to letters received 
here. Considerable time has been 
spent at the ruins of Pompeii and 
in visiting other points of interest. 



! A Music Library 

is being planned by Euterpe, 
COLORADO COLLEGE music club, 
and details were d'.scussed Tuesday 
night at a picnic meeting of the 
club at the W. A. A. house. It will 
be housed in Perkins hall. 

Officers were elected at the meet- 
i i"^. Ruth Crawford is president: 
Clifford Kolsrud, vice-president; 
Helen Thompson, secretary; Doro- 
thy Elston. treasurer; Jack Kintz, 
librarian. All persons interested in 
music may attend the Euterpe meet- 
ings. 

A round trip rate of $1.25 for 
COLORADO COLLEGE students 
^oinsf to Denver Saturday is offered 
by the C. & S and Santa Fe rail- 
roads. The regular 7:30 a. m. train 
on which the team will ride will be 
held until 8 o'clock. It will leave 
Denver at 8:45 for the return trip. 
The round trip rate is good on any 
train to Denver Saturday. 

Ein Telephongespraech 

A full program was given at the 
German club meeting Wednesday 
night. Doris Shock, Vera Wanger- 
in and Mary Bledsoe gave a play 
entitled, "Ein Telephongespraech". 
Hobart Corning told a story in Ger- 
man and illustrated it with draw- 
ings. Mrs. Anne Sutton, sponsor of j 
the club, told several stories about 
modern Germany in English. 

Second year German students . 
will give a play at the meeting Nov. 
I. Lawrence Fields, who has stud- i 
ied two years at the Art Academy 
in Vienna, will speak at that meet- l 
ing. 



A Gentlemen's Agreement 

between Dr. C. B. Hershey of 
COLORADO COLLEGE and the 
officials of the Colorado Springs 
public school system enables the 
College to offer a course in practice 
teaching. It is largely thru the 
courtesy of H. M. Corning, super- 
intendent of Colorado Springs 
schools, that seniors are permitted 
to become teaching cadets for one 
semester. 

Education 401, which is the offi- 
cial title of the course, embraces 
three points. First is the actual 
teaching, ranging from playground 
supervisor to instructor of foreign 
language in senior high school. At 
least 1 5 observations are made in 
the schools during the semester. The 
conference period at 4 o'clock on 
Monday is the third part of the 
course. At these conferences men 
of prominence in school work ad- 
dress the students. The high light of 
the course is a social meeting at Dr. 
Hershey 's home. 

Twenty seniors are doing prac- 
tice teaching at the present time. 



Must be in Condition 

Men entering the annual cross- 
country run to be held between 
halves of the Brigham Young - C. C. 
football g?me will have to be in 
condition for the event, fo E. Irish, 
graduate manager of athletics an- 
nounces. All men on fraternitv 
teams will have to comply with 
training rules. 

Isaac Bros, is giving a team 
trophy this year. Besides the team 
trophy there will be individual 
prizes for the first 10 runners. 

Appreciation 

Waldeman Lingren, chairman of 
the sixteenth International Geologi- 
cal congress which met in Colorado 
Springs Aug. 24 and 25, has re- 
cently written a letter of apprecia- 
tion to W. W. Postlethwaite of 
COLORADO COLLEGE for the en- 
tertainment and hospitality accord- 
ed them while here, especially by 
Prof. H. E. Mathias and members 
of the geology department. 

A Friend 

Bemis freshmen a r e no longer 
in awe of Mrs. Louise W Fau- 
teaux. dean of women of COLO- 
RADO COLLEGE, following an en- 
joyable Sunday evening spent in 
her sitting room. That she is their 
friend thev soon found. An invita- 
tion was also extended to the wom- 
en to use her library freely. 



Postponed 

Due to the decision of the Stu- 
dent Council to place the names of 
the nominees for Homecoming 
Queen on the Student ballots, the 
class elections have been postponed 
to Thursday, Nov. 2. Elec- 

tions will be held next Thursday in 
Room 13, and will start at 8:00 
A. M. and continue until 4:00 P.M. 

Nominations for Homecoming 
Queen were made from the floor in 
the Student Assembly held yester- 
day. Those nominated for Queen 
are Elizabeth Evans, Betty Foster, 
Mary Jean MacDonald, Elizabeth 
Richter, Helen Walker. 

The candidates for class offices 
are to be found on page 2. 



Chemical Contribution 

Two projects which may prove of 

lasting benefit are being developed 

in the chemistry department at 

COLORADO COLLEGE. Wallace 

j Peck, chemistry major, is experi- 

j menting with procedures for soften- 

i ing water without the introduction 

, of sodium salts. 

Charles Bordner and Arthur Roe, 
chemistry instructors, are develop- 
ing a new system of micro-chemical 
[ analysis. It consists in the qualita- 
tive analysis of small particles and 
| may supplant older methods. 



An Intimate Knowledge 

of Russia and her plans has 
caused Dr. A. P. R. Drucker, dean 
of business, and Dr. W. Lewis Ab- 
bott, professor of economics and 
sociology, to view with favor her 
recognition by the United States. 

As a native of Russia and a citi- 
zen of the United States, Dr. Druc- 
ker is well qualified as an authority. 
Dr. Abbott has traveled widely thru 
Russia and has also studied Russian 
conditions, as has Dr. Drucker. Both 
of the men believe recognition 
would not cause communism in the 
United States, but it would result 
in a mutual reciprocity between the 
two nations in trade relations and 
in the protection of Siberia and 
Alaska from the possible aggran- 
dizements of Japan. 

C. E. A. Convention 

Colorado Springs may be the 
scene in of the delegate assembly of 
the Colorado Education association 
to be held in December. Faculty 
men and women who desire to at- 
tend the assembly and also the an- 
nual convention to be held in Den- 
ver or Pueblo, Nov. 2. 3 and 4, 
may obtain membership blanks at 
the secretary's office. 



THE TIGER 



Friday, September 27, 1933 



THE TIGER 



M 

Editor LEW CROSBY 

Business Manager Everett Stapleton 



CANDIDATES FOR CLASS 
ELECTIONS 
Senior Class 

President — Kenneth Gloss, John 
Mihalick 



Notice 

The Tiger staff will meet in the 
Pit at Palmer hall at 1 : 30 Tuesday. 
Everyone must be there unless ex- 
cused because of work or classes. 



Vice President — Gratia Belle , Everyone is requested to bring note 



♦ Shortage 

of COLORADO COLLEGE TIGERS has become one ofthe para- 
mount complaints resounding through the halls on Friday after the 
1 IGERS come out. There are enough magazines printed that each mem- 
ber of the student body of COLORADO COLLEGE should have one. 
You will notice that this does not include friends and relatives out of 
the state. Each extra copy that you take with you means that someone 
is going to turn up "minus." You may have a TIGER sent to your home 
address or to your friends by paying for an extra subscription. 

♦ Activity Credit 

for social organizations is a good idea if the activity engaged in 
brings mutual good both to the student and his organization. The day is 
past, however, when society-minded individuals can use the TIGER for 
an added activity without work. The staff box on the editorial page has 
remained blank to date for that very reason. When you want to WORK 
on the staff, we want you to work with us, but when you try to eat your 
cake and have it, you can be of little use to this publication. This is as 
much a business institution as any other unit of college activity, and as 
business men and women, we'd like to have you — otherwise — but the 
inference should be plain enough. 



Versatility 

is the qualification one must have 
to be the COLORADO COLLEGE 
nurse. Miss Catherine Ryan believes 
Monday is her busiest day. Be- 



1515 

is the date of publication of the 
oldest book in Coburn Library. It is 
written in Latin and is entitled, 



cause of strenuous weekends, she "Durandus Rationali, divinorum.' 
has a large number of cases for 
treatment, including colds, sprains 
of various sorts and even occasion- 
al cases of poison ivy. 

On the days of inspection, which 
are never announced beforehand, 
there is considerable excitement 
around the campus. Miss Ryan de- 



A Latin version of Aesop's Fables 
is the next oldest book and was 
printed in 1534. A third book was 
printed in 1575, called "Julius 
Caesar, Commentari". 

There is also a 1698 edition of 
Milton's prose work which should 
nv. 



Blackmail, Sally Tompkins 

Secretary — Marie Hoag, Evelyn 
Richter 

Treasure r — Clarence Kehoe, 
Carl Maynard 
Junior Class 

President — Harriet Kearsey, Lu- 
cille Swartz 

Vice President — Budd Anderson, 
Carl Garrett 

Secretary — Harriet Engel, Doro- 
thy Skidmore 

Treasurer — Henry Finger, David 
David Griffith 
Sophomore Class 

President — Harold Berg, Richard 
Hall 

Vice President — Virginia Berger, 
Jane Kimzey 

Secretary — Elizabeth Evans, 
Winifred McBroom 

Treasurer — Fred Miles, Fred 
Simpson 
Freshman Class 

President — Hobart Corning, Eu- 
gene Gustavson 

Vice President — Margaret Simp- 
son, Dorothy Weaver 

Secretary — Elizabeth Richter, 
Miriam Rothgerber 

Treasurer — Robert Glew, Curtis 
Perryman 

Di«cover Indian Camns 

COLORADO COLLEGE was well 
represented last summer on an ex- 
pedition in Yamna ranon in north- 
western Colorado. The expedition 
which discovered pictopranhs ?nd 
Indian cmo sites, was led bv Dr. 
Te?>n Dubois. Jr.. the son of the 
famous Dutch explorer and anthro- 



sires to inspect the lodges on an ' P rove of in terest to m 

average day. The boys try to as- j pologisf and finder of the Ja^a aoe- 

certain the inspection day and pass Five o'CIock Series man. Prof Penlan^. Harold S?r- 

the word along. This week the ! The book of Job will be the ba- k's'an and T e^na>-d Sutton renre- 

news ran swiftly. After completing j sic subject for the fourth group of sented COLORADO COLLEGE on 

one house, she arrived at the next the Five o'CIock series of addresses the trip. 

to find two vacuums and several being given this semester by Dean 



books and pencils. 

A special train will be run to 
Boulder Saturday, Nov. 4, for the 
C C. - C. U. football game by the 
C. & S. railroad. Tse round trip 
| fare is $2 on the special, which w'D 
leave Colorado Springs at 8:45. It 
will get back to Colorado Springs 
about 10 o'clock that night. 

The Quadrangle Association of 
Colorado college is an organization 
whose membership consists of all the 
women residents of the halls. Its 
main purpose is to regulate their 
life in the halls. The officers of this 
association are as follows: Presi- 
dent, Lucile Swartz; Vice President, 
Helen Walker: Recording Secre- 
tary, Kay Lignham: Corresponding 
Secretary, Edith Gaylord; Trea- 
surer, Florence Robinson; Social 
Chairman, Julia Dunham; Scholar- 
ship, Chairman. Jim Browder and 
Dining Room, Sally Tompkins. 

These people are assisted by Hall 
Councils consisting of a president 
and a secretary for each floor. The 
floor presidents are: 
Second Floor, Ruth Farbush 
Third Floor, Marguerite Dixon 
Fourth Floor. Virginia Graham 

The Quadrangle Association has 
big plans ahead of them for the 
coming year. 

Julia Dunham is doing her best 
to plan interesting dinner parties for 
special occasions for the ha'l c'rls 
and it is rumored that the hall girls 
will enjoy a Hard Times Dinner to 
celebrate Halloween. 



brooms working double time. The 
display evidently pleased her, for 
she didn't inspect. 

The Capitulatory Regime in Turkey 

is the title of a book written by 
Dr. Nasima Sousa, '28, and publish- 
ed by the Johns Hopkins press dur- 
ing the summer. The work is an am- 
plification of a thesis written during 
Dr. Sousa's senior year at COLO- 
RADO COLLEGE. 



James G. McMurtrv in Shove chap- 
el. A series of addresses has been 
given each semester since the dedi- 
cation of the chapel in 1931. These 
have proved popular and there has 
been a marked increase in attend- 
ance since the inauguration. 

The lectures on the book of Job 
is in answer to many requests re- 
ceived last spring for a study of the 
book. The first lecture was deliv- 
ered on "Job, the Man". The re- 
maining talks are Thursdav. Nov. 
2, "lob the Book"; Nov. 9. "Job, 
the Problem"; Nov. 16. "Job. the 
Solution". The public as well as 
students and faculty of COLO- 
RADO COLLEGE may attend. 



An Unknown River 

"Life is hke an unknown river; 
with an nnknown sourre r<nd an 
unknown destiation". said Dr. John 
H. Skee" of tn e First B^tist church 
in his chanel address Tuesday. 

"Moc» of us live on »np Mirface 
of life,*" he asserted. "Christ once 
told a vr>nncr man tV>at if he wished 
• o feel l'fe he must do lV>r»»e t^'ngs. 
keep, give, and follow Him. Keep 
li'm«elf mire and a'evl. give r-dvire 
'■"■othevVinod ?nd sennre. mA follow 
Him. It is a wav of h-rdshin and 
differ!" ', but to d-> thpcp whole- 
heartedly you will feel life." 

Bicvcles 

An inspection of the Golden 



Two - - 

undefeated touch football aggre- 
gations will fight it out for the inter- 
fr.itcrnity championship lliis after- 
noon when the strong Phi Delt team (7 vr l c m ;|l, WM , ne J„- Crt f a J,;. 

" """ ! . er * ,llc ^f ta ^ heta Pl se . v " AlP na Kappa Psi cvcle trip bv a group of Bemis girls ! to the Rotary club of Gunnison as 

en. 1 In Delta Iheta has two vie- announces the pledging of James Saturday. Some of the girls rode ; district governor. While there he will 

tones recorded to their credit while McCarty. Ben Carson and Max bicycle for the first time, but nil visit Western State college and the 

the Beta s have one. T close game Fnck. Alpha Kappa Psi will hold (he riders managed to make the high school. He will return in time 

iictpated. initiation ceremonies Sunday. trip without mishap. for his classes Wednesday. 



Larger Art Classes 

^ More students from COLORADO 
COLLEGE are enrolled at the 
Broadmoor Art academy this year 
than last, Frank X. Ryan, business 
manager of the academy, recently 
announced. 

Many worthwhile exhibits 
planned for the year he said. 






are 



Signet Ring 

Katherine E. Ragle was awarded 
a ring bearing the crest of Kaopa 
Alpha Theta for her high standing 
in scholarship. This ring is presented 
each year by the alumnae associa- 
tion to the Theta having the high- 
est scholastic average during her 
Freshman year. 



Ambassador 

W. D. Copeland. secretary of 
COLORADO COLLEGE will go to 
Gunnison Sunday on an official visit 



Friday, September 27, 1933 



THE TIGER 




Let Us 
Prepare Your Car . 
for Winter Driving 



Complete Lubrication 

Motor Oils 

Batteries and Repairing 

Firestone Anti-freeze 

Prestone and Alcohol 



Brake Relining and Adjusting 

Texaco "Fire Chief" Gasoline 

"Red Head" Car Heaters 



&iPBduk 



115-121 N. Nevada 
Phone M. 202 



* 



SHORTHAND IN 12 LESSONS 

Thousands of students find ABC 
Shorthand of tremendous value in 
taking accurate lecture and reading 
notes — This shorthand can be mas- 
tered quickly in 12 easy lessons 
without an instructor — Complete 
course now sells for $1.00 at 
Pikes Peak Book and Stationery Co. 



PHILO VANCE 

Returns to Colorado 

Springs to solve his 

greatest mystery 

WILLIAM 
POWELL 

AS 

PHILO VANCE 

in S. S. Van Dine's 

"THE 

KENNEL 

MURDER 

CASE" 

with 

EUGENE PALLETTE 

MARY ASTOR 

FRANK MORGAN 

STARTS SATURDAY 




♦;^.^:k^:k^i~:k~:k^:^:k~:«:^>«:^:«:":^>»>«;' 



t 



KEYHOLE 
EEPER 



•♦**•**♦**♦**♦•*♦**♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦*♦**♦**♦**♦**♦**♦**•**♦**♦**♦•*♦**♦**♦**♦**♦* 

With the closing of the main 
building of the Broadmoor and con- 
sequently the ballroom, the winter 
social season for Colorado Springs 
and the College as well looks rather 
bleak. In former years the Saturday 
night dances out at the Broadmoor 
were a thing looked forward to all 
the preceeding week. And last year 
when the price was upped to two 
rocks per couple it was the height 
of swank to take the gal friend to 

the Broadmoor on Saturday night. 
.«. •«. .*. 

Taking the place of the local 
Broadmoor, for tomorrow night at 
least, Denver's Cosmopolitan Hotel 
will be the night Mecca for all 
football supporters from COLORA- 
DO COLLEGE who will have been 
at the D. U. game previously (let 
come what may, so help me). One 
of the high points of the season's 
grid schedule. a large group 
from Colorado Springs are planning 
to attend the game. At the Cosmo — 
which seems to be the general fav- 
orite — there will be separate tables 
for individual fraternities and ev- 
erything loks now as if it will be 

a real gala fotball night! 
.** .«. ••• 

Everybody clamors for dirt, dirt, 
dirt — if they want it so bad, why 
don't they provide it, do something 
about it? One really can't create 
dirt out of just nothing at all (or 
just hearsay). This being a very 
lean week for the good old filth, 
gossip mongers will have to go out 
and dig for themselves without 
much assistance from the Keeper. 

Our personal nominatio l for the 

best dressed and best looking gal in 

school: Mary Jean MacDonald. 
■•• ••• ••• 

But here are a few personal 
snatches that have managed to drift 
in through the too small keyhole: 
Echoes of pledge day are still heard 
. . . . for instance, the Delta Gam- 
mas bid 25 and got 17 

Dorothy Jamieson and Luzilla Eu- 
bank look alike .... Janice Green- 
wood looks very gypsyish in her 
bright reds and long earrings .... 
and this is the time of year when 
everybody gets soreheads thinking 
up something nice and clever in the 
line of floats and house decorations 

in spite of their haircuts, the 

Phi Gams have really fixed up their 
house until now, with the fancy new 
lamps, wallpaper, furniture, stair- 
case, etc., it is one of the best on 

the campus overheard: "Say 

kid, just feel that," — Ruth Liver- 
man inviting a "feel" of a roll of 
flesh as she sits down and it lops 
over her belt .... p. n. for the 
trickiest hats on the campus' 



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THE TIGER 



Friday, September 27, 1933 



Patronize— 

TIGER 

Advertisers 

They are loyal to 

Colorado College 




Cobura Library 

COLORADO COLLEGE 

Colorado Springs, Colorado 
Fully accredited Co-educational 

Adequate equipment and high standards of scholastic attainment 
make Colorado College one of the outstanding Liberal Arts Col- 
leges of the country. 

A large faculty makes possible an individual friendly guidance 
for each student. 

Thorough and interesting courses in the Schools of ARTS and 
SCIENCES, LETTERS and FINE ARTS, the NATURAL SCI- 
ENCES, and the SOCIAL SCIENCES develop his mind in prep- 
aration for purposeful effective living in the modern world. 

Unsurpassed climate, beautiful environment and the influence of 
a cultured community combine to make study at COLORADO 
COLLEGE a privilege. 

C. B. HERSHEY, A. M., ED. D., Acting President 



Neophytes Perform 

by Bob Johnson 

Yearlings made their bow in 
COLORADO COLLEGE theatricals 
last Wednesday and Ihursday 
niglits in Cogswell theatre with the 
presentation of Wodehouse-Hay 
comedy, 'A Damsel in Distress", 
well-acted tor the most part and 
well-produced, the play went over 
with the audience who appreciated 
the typical Wodehouse humor. 

rrothy in story, the play concerns 
the ettorts of one George Bevan 
(Dick Kodgers), super song-writer, 
to marry the daughter of the high- 
hat Marshmoretons, Lady Maud, 
(Marion Marriott). Young Reggie 
Marshmoreton (Joe Rustin), des- 
pairing pride of the elder Marsh- 
moretons, is also bound to marry 
out of his class and his love is Alice 
faraday (Anne Daniels), the Earl 
ot M. himself (Gordon Parker, Jr.) 
gets the fever and being a widower 
of long standing gets a chorus girl 
for himself. So in spite of much 
opposition from Lady Caroline 
Elizabeth Dewing) and Percy 
(James McCarty), the last of the 
family die-hards, all the pairs get 
married off according to their sev- 
eral desires and everything is oke. 

Dick Rodgers playing the lead 
was a rather pleasing juvenile who, 
after a spell of over-acting at the 
beginning of the show, gave a com- 
petent performance while Marion 
Marriott, his opposite was attrac- 
tive but had the same fault as Rod- 
gers — overacting, but hers lasted 
throughout the play. 

Acting the comedy lead, Joe 
Rustin ran away with the show, 
with his screwy hilarity and his ut- 
terly dead pan. Anne Daniels, one 
of the two upperclassmen in the 
cast, was lovely looking and brought 
a pleasing restraint to the perfor- 
mance, something that was general- 
ly lacking. Elizabeth Dewing in her 
old lady role was satisfactory in 
diction and experssion but annoyed 
with her constant posture of stand- 
ing with her hands clutching her 
stomach. 

Marcus Shivers and Louise Yad- 
en, as butler and between maid, 
were the servant team, with Shivers 
— who incidentally had the most 
lines of anyone in the cast — start- 
ing out well, but rapidly falling out 
of character. Miss Yaden was de- 
lightful in her insouicance but too 
pretty with her hair ribbon and 
curls for the tweeny role. James 
McCarty played the sissy well en- 
ough though not always convinc- 
ingly, while Merry Hyatt, as Miss 
Moulde of the tearoom, was scream- 
ingly funny in a Zr.su Pitts part. 
Gordon Parker in his aged role was 
good in his angrier moments but 
fell out of character in his calmer 
ones, though altogether was an 
amusing bit of acting, and Peg 
Swan looked good as the chorus 



Silver Glade 

Of interest to students in COLO- 
RADO COLLEGE is dapper Mau- 
rice (Larry) Cotton entertainer with 
Carol Loffner's band at the Silver 
Glade in the Cosmopolitan Hotel, 
Denver. Larry is well-known in 
Colorado Springs and has many ac- 
quaintances on the campus. 

Cotton is from Oklahoma Uni- 
versity where he started orchestra 
work with the Oklahoma Ramblers. 
He is majoring in law and intends 




to get his degree. He is a member 
of Delta Upsilon, social fraternity, 
and Blue Key, Tri Chi, Ruff Nex 
honorary organizations. He was a 
member of the 0. U. glee club as 
the only freshman ever to make the 
organization and has sang the lead 
in Gounod's "Faust". The Silver 
Glade is lucky to have such an at- 
traction to offer college studes on 
their week-end trips for a dance 
and dine at the Cosmo. 



girl but should have been more hard 
boiled. 

John Craig, the other upperclass- 
man; Dave Baker, Mary Tyson, 
Pauline Hoopes; Tom Ross; George 
Clamp, who looked about as much 
like a poet rs Wallace Berry and 
wolfed chocolate eclairs es if he 
hadn't erten for months; rnd But 
Udick all carried minor roles. 

Two large groups did well in dif- 
ficult mob scenes as tourists and 
guests. The settings of the theatre's 
stage entrance and the tea shop 
were fair while the setting for Tot- 
leigh Castle was good-looking and 
immensely effective. Freshmen, un- 
der the direction of Arthur G. 
Sharp, Jr., were responsible for the 
entire production even to stage 
crew, costumes, and properties, rnd 
give promise for the future of Ko- 
share shows. 



Friday, October 20, 1933 



THE TIGER 



EXCHANGES 

More News 

on the NRA. New Mexico U. is 
giving an NRA dance for the pur- 
pose of purchasing dictionaries. 

This is getting to be an excuse 

for everything. 

.«. .». ... 

Confidence 

First C. U. co-ed: "Have you 
been saying 'Howdy' to the boys 
you see on the campus?" 

2nd Miss Frankenstein : "Good- 
ness, no — if I did I'd just simply 
be swamped for dates." 

(Editor's note:Scuh tripe.) 

— The Silver and Gold. 



Co-eds at the University of Mis- 
souri, who want to ride in a taxi- 
cab, must first get permission from 
the dean before embarking. 

"FLUNK DAMMIT FLUNK" has 
been organized as a fraternity at 
Alabama U. Its purpose is to fos- 
ter a feeling of brotherly love and 
sympathy among the lesser lights of 
the institution, whose grades pre- 
vent them from joining other fra- 
ternities on the campus. 

Members of a sorority at Mis- 
souri university have signed a 
pledge not to eat more than fifteen 
cents worth of food when out on a 
date. What girls. 

• The football team of the Univer- 
sity of Nebraska will appear on the 
gridiron this year wearing satin 
pants, but it will still be another 
season or two, we hope, before they 
resort to the lace trimmings. 

— The Doan Owl. 



James Turner is working on his 
master's degree at the University of 
Southern California. 



At Boulder 

nine Sigma Chis who have their 
pins out plan to leap in the lake 
rather than give out cigars to their 
less gullible brothers. We are hav- 
ing the same trouble here. Any one 
with a remedy for this situation 
please notify the TIGER office at 
once. 



Poetic 

contribution this week clipped 

from The Gusher: 

When ice cream grows on maca- 
roni trees, 

And the sharp sands are muddy, 

When cats and dogs wear over- 
shoes — 



Shampoo and Finger Wave 
50 cents 

MARY SUTTON 
BEAUTY SHOP 

M. 1186 105 E. Cache la Poudre 




keep coming back 
to that word "balanced" 
on the back of the 
Chesterfield package 

YOU often hear the word balance 
— something is out of balance 
— top-heavy, not on an "even keel." 

What you read, "Chesterfield 
Cigarettes are a balanced blend," 
means that the right amounts of 
home-grown tobaccos — the right 
kind, the right quantity — are 
blended and cross -blended with 
tobaccos from Turkey and Greece. 

When these tobaccos are bal- 
anced one against the other, then 
you have a mild cigarette, a better- 
tasting cigarette. 

May we ask you to read again the 
statement on the back of the Chest- 
erfield package ? May we ask you 
to try Chesterfield ? 



vAesterfi 




A Balanced Blend 



© 1933, Liggett & Myers Tobacco Co. 

BISSEL'S PHARMACY 

HKNRY E. COPELAND, Prop. 

A Tiger Booster 

Tel. M. 980 Corner Dale and Weber 

PROMPT DELIVERY 



PHOTOGRAPHS 

The Gift that only you can give 
Official Photographer, C. C. Nugget 

PAYTON STUDIO 

30 S. Tejon Phone M. 477-J 



Strachan's 

SWEET SHOP 

Bijou and Nevada 



6 



THE TIGER 



Friday, September 27, 1933 



ACT NOW 

Just A Few 
More Days 

SALE 

HART 

SCHAFFNER 

& MARX 

AND WAYBILT 

SUITS 

$| 7.50 

Smart snappy models 
for College Men — New 
Grays, Tan-Browns and 
Blues — Season's accept- 
ed styles and fabrics. 

WAYMIRE 

CLOTHING CO 



On 

Candy 

Counters 

Every 

Place 



The Biggest Nickel's 
worth of GOOD Candy 
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For GOOD 
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PORT 




17 N. Tejon 



Tiger Huddle 

"Chris" Marlowe 

Quoting from "Poss" Parsons, 
Denver Post sport's writer, in re- 
gard to last week's game. 

"The defeat of the Tigers left 
the local supporters stunned and 
Coach Van de Graaff seemed in a 
trance after the grme. Perhaps now 
he can sympathize with coach Han- 
cock of the State Teachers Col- 
lege. In the season's opener C. C 
beat Teachers after being outplayed 
most of the game. It took the New 
Mexico Teachers to avenge the de- 
feat for the Colorado Te?chers." 
.... I am rather interested in our 
colleagues gracious though inept 
use of material in his sports column. 
Van de Graff, to me, looked per- 
fectly normal after the game. Some 
students appeared rather disappoint- 
ed .. . hardlv stunned. At lerst no 
officials were "given the air" for our 
loss Mr. Sport's editor and ... . 
little sympathey towards Greeley 
has been shown by any real Tiger 
j . . . Beat D. U.! ... Before we drop 
the subiect we note the action tak- 
en by the Rocky Mountain football 
association regarding the sustain- 
j rnent of Lou Vidal. The report 
! criticized Coach Hancock of Tea- 
chers and the Greeley athletic 
board. ... in an editorial of the 
Teacher's College Mirror last week, 
the editor was closing this particu- 
lar incident with his swan song, "We 
got rid of the referee didn't we?" . 
. . Perhaps this individual h?s 
changed his tune to the Mae West 
song ... we will take uo the swan 
song prof . . . Beat D. U. ! . . . . 

The yearling football squad 

will trek to Pioneer stadium this 
afternoon where they will draw first 
blood with the strong D. U. Fresh- 
! man eleven. Denver boasts of hav- 
' ing a strong outfit and the Tiser 
cubs are in for a tough tussle with 
the Pioneers . . . very little enthus- 
I iasm has been manifested at the 
I beginning of a new inter-fraternity 
j fchedule. Some mighty fine pre- 
, season form has been displayed and 
with the third week of inter-frater- 
nily strife looming ... a belter 
brand of ball is in store for the 
Greek followers. . . . Beat D. U. ! 
.... Since dopsters . . . dope buck- 
ctf are being kicked for "a roll of 
??.!loping hen houses" every week, 
tr.ir editor "does not choose" to 
make any score predictions on Sat- 
urdays games .... We might add. 

however that methinks . . . 

C. C. will lose to Denver bv a 9 
point margin . . . that Utah will 
him Utah A«sjies . . . that Teach- 
ers should win over Western State 
. . . C. U. should have little trouble 
with Wyo 



D. U. vs. C. C. 

An Upset 

is the cry of all loyal Tigers to- 
day as the time draws near for the 
annual gridiron classic with D. U. 
tomorrow afternoon in Pioneer sta- 
dium. The Tigers are entering the 
game as the underdogs but with 
lots of fight and with Van de 
Graaff's bag of tricks once let loose, 
the Pioneers are in for a grand ol* 
football game. According to a spe- 
cial bulletin received by the Tiger 
this morning, D. U. fans are antici- 
pating a close game. The bulletin 
goes on. "The famous Tiger 'bag 
o' tricks', almost a tradition of 
Denver-Colorado College games has 
been tightly tied thus far this sea- 
son. Whether or not it will be 
opened Saturday is unknown but 
fans believe that Van de Graak is 
ready to shoot the works." Denver 
officials predict the largest crowd 
of the season for the game. 



A Feld Goal 

was the margin of victory scored 
by the New Mexico State Normal 
football warriors Friday afternoon 
in an interesting but ragged foot- 
ball game. It was the educated toe 
of "Dutch" Dunbar that sent the 
New Mexico eleven home in tri- 
umph. The ball traveled some 41 
yards and squarely through the 
goal posts for a three point lead 
the Tigers were never able to over- 
take. 

The Tigers looked better on of- 
fense but lacked the scoring punch 
which is necessary to win football 
games. The home eleven had five 
opportunities to push the pigskin 
over but were nailed in their tracks 
on each attempt. 



Phi Delta Tseta hung up their 
defeated Delta Alpha Phi by a 
score of 31-11 Thursday, and in 
the second game the Phi Gams 
scored their second victory of t h e 
season by defeating Kappa Sigma 
22-12. Dick Hall of the Phi Delts 
was high scorer of the evening with 
a total of 10 points. 



Interfraternity Strife 

Fsi Delta Theta hung up their 
second win of the season by win- 
ning from the Independents last 
Tuesd y. Price was high point man 
of the evening with a total of 16 
points. In the second game on the 
Tuesday evening schedule, the Sig- 
ma Chi five defeated t h e Kappa 
Sigma team by a close score of 1 7- 
16. This game eliminated the Kap- 
pa Sigs from the championship 
race. 



Candies for your 
HALLOWE'EN PARTIES 

HUGHES 
CANDY SHOP 

128 N. TEJON 

We never hurry You Out 

Each patron is a guest at the 

PAUDRE PAUFFE 

BEAUTY SHOPPE 
Phone 717-J 222 N. Tejon 



Colorado College 

TEXT BOOKS 

AND SUPPLIES 

C. C. and Fraternity 

Stationery 

Laundry Bags — $2.00 Each 

Murray Drug Co. 

Across From the Campus 




For your Convenience 



Let us do the Dirty 
Work This Year 

Expert Furnace Cleaning 
Reasonable Rates 

HEYSE 

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WORKS 

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Reasonable 
Prices 

Dependable 
Service 



We wash everything with 
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LAUNDRY 

Phones M. 1085-1086 



Friday, September 27, 1933 



THE TIGER 



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827 N. Tejon M. 1317 



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Waistlines are taken care 
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point that fashion says 
must be trim and slim. If 
your dia phragm needs 
smoothing (above the 
waistline) select one of 
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ble Support" brassieres. 



There are Maiden Form girdles to 
solve all *'hip difficulties*'' — to give 
you the gende^ moulded curves you 
want in place of tlie bulges and 
bumps that most figures come by 
naturally. 



Shown on the figure are Maiden 
Form's new V-line brassiere — **Dec- 
La-Tay" — designed to give width as 
well as uplift to the bust; and "High- 
Waist** girdle No. 1748, an exquisite 
"stream -line" 16-inch semi-step-in 
of elastic and satin brocade, lace 
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great variety of Maiden Form crea- 
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OCIAL 



The Social Calendar 

Friday, Oct. 27 

Sigma Chi tea dance for Delta 

Gamma 
A.W.S. costume ball 
Saturday, Oct. 28 

C. C.-D. U. game, Denver. 
Friday, Nov. 3 

Sigma Chi tea dance for Kappa 

Alpha Theta 
Kappa Kappa Gamma dance 
Saturday, Nov. 4 

C. C. - University of Colorado at 
Boulder 
Sunday, Nov. 5 

Kappa Kappa Gamma Open 
House 



Pink Rose Buds 

With paddles on the walls to sig- 
nify a pledge dance, and with sil- 
ver crosses on blue backgrounds for 
programs to signify a Sigma Chi 
dance, the evening of Saturday, 
October 21, was a merry one. The 
party started out with beautiful 
pink rose buds decorating the 
tables, but by the time the guests 
had departed, so had the roses. The 
pledges whose names decorated the 
paddles are the Messrs. Richard Al- 
derson, George Clamp, Herbert 
Conzen, John Dickey, Maxwell 
Frick, Harold Haines, Loring Len- 
nox, Thomas Mclntyre, Charles 
MacDonald, Wayne Neal, Curtis 
Perryman, James Riley, James Rob- 
erts, Robert Stagg. 

.«. ••• ... 

Hades Hop 

With devils masquerading as 
dance programs, and a group of 
Hell's Angels (otherwise known as 
Johnny Metzler and his band) fur- 
nishing wicked music, Kappa Alpha 
Theta entertained at a Hades Hop 
in honor of the new pledges. The 
Broadmoor Night Club posed as a 
corner of Satan's domain for the 
evening of October 15, at which 
time the following pledges were 
honored; Elizabeth Chaney, Ann j 
Espe, Anna Florey, Ruth Ann John- 
son, Lucille Hampton, Louise Kirk- 
patrick, Marion Marriott, Miriam | 
Rothgerber, Mary Jo Sparkman, 
Martha Statton, Ruth Mary Web- 
ster, Gratia Wrye. 

••• ••• ... 

A Hallowe'en Atmosphere 

prevailed at the Delta Alpha Phi 
pledge dance which was held Oc- 
tober 20 at the chapter house. 
Jack-o'-Lanterns, witches, and black 
cats helped to carry out the spooky 
spirit. After dancing to the music 
of Drexel Broome's orchestra, the 
guests refreshed themselves with 
pumpkin pie and cider. The pledges 
in whose honor the dance was given 
are; William Davis, Robert Glew, 
Paul House, Richard Jones, Ben 
Kirby, Paul McConnell, Fred 
Shantz, Jr., Gilbert Verba. 



Chapel Calendar 

Tuesday, Oct. 31, 10:00 a. m. 
Chapel service, Dr. Wallace H. 
Carver, pastor First Presbyter- 
ian church. 
Wednesday, Nov. 1. 5:15 p. m. 
Organ recital. Dr. Frederick 
Boothroyd. 
Thursday, Nov. 2. 5:00 p. m. 
The second lecture in the fourth 
group of the Five o'clock 
Series of Address by Dean Mc- 
Murtry on "The Book of Job". 
Subject: Jobb: the Book". 
The public is invited to these pro- 
grams. 

The members of Kappa Kappa 
Gamma held a very informal Sun- 
day night supper at Stratton Park 
Inn on October 22. The guests of 
honor were Mrs. Erwin, Mrs. Cecil 
VerDuft, Mary Elizabeth Pitts, and 
Catherine McCuin. 



Alumni Luncheon 

Plans for the annual alumni 
luncheon on Homecoming day were 
formulated Thursday night in the 
office of t h e secretary of COLO- 
RADO COLLEGE by the officers of 
the Alumni association. The lunch- 
eon will be held in Bemis hall at 
1 2 o'clock, Saturday, Nov. 1 1 . 
There will be no formal program, 
it being an occasion for a get-to- 
gether and pep meeting 

Peter C. Holm of Denver is the 
president of the organization. Les- 
ter Griswold is vice president, W. 
D. Copeland is secretary and Miss 
Lorena Berger is treasurer. 



••• ••• ••• 



Originality 

That is what's wanted at the an- 
nual A. W. S. Colonial ball which 
will be held tonight at 8 o'clock in 
Bemis commons. There will be priz- 
es given for the most clever and 
original costumes. All C. C. girls are 
urged to dig out the old garb and 
enjoy a good program. Music will 

be furnished by John Day. 
••• ••• ••« 

Gold and White 

A large gold anchor over the 
fireplace, a large gold and white 
pledge pin on each wall, yellow 
flowers in bowls, white candles, and 
gold and white programs were the 
high points of the Delta Gamma 
dance which was given on Friday 
evening, October 20, in honor of 
the new pledges and new initiates. 



Would-be-farmers and farmer- 
ettes jigged to the tunes of "Tur- 
key in the Straw", "Old Joe Coons", 
and other fast-stepping numbers 
played by Drexel Broome's orches- 
tra at the Kappa Sigma Barn Dance 
on Saturday night, October 21. Cid- 
er and doughnuts were served to 
rollicking guests between dances in 
the hay loft of Sinton's barn. 



W.I.LUCAS 

— HAS— 

EVERYTHING IN SPORTINC 
GOODS— 

"Tigers Always Welcome" 

120 North Tejon Street 
Main 900 



THE GOLDEN CYCLE 
SHINE PARLOR 

WE DO SUPERIOR WORK 

FOR THE SAME PRICE 

GOLDEN CYCLE BUILDING 

HATS CLEANED AND BLOCKED 

TODD COLBERT, Prop. 



Couture's 

FRENCH CLEANING & 
DYEING CO. 



We Solicit Your Patronage 



218 N. Tejon St. 

Colorado Springs, Colo. 

Phone Main 1288 



* 



* 



WAGNER-FULTS 
STUDIO 

Official Photographer 

for 

Colorado College 

"Portraits That Please" 

Burns Theatre Building 
Elevator Service 



* 






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Swagge ... - 
end the tnalter 

of "suit or 
cent?" by fur- 
nishing you 
with both in 
one costume. 
■'■, or Full- 
length tweed 
coat and skirt 
to match 

e with fur. 
$282.50 to 
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Twin-Sweater 

Knitted Suits 

that tackle the 

problem of 

smartness at 

low cost 

$5.95 



Wool Dresses 

—guard the 

rooter from 

unseen attack 

by Winter's 

team, 1 and 2- 

piece. 

$7.95 

to $19.50 



4 



Quarterback 



Bright Silk 
Frocks guard 
the team's rep- 
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colorful game. 
Red, rust, 
green, blue, 
blackberry. 
$12.50 up 



Corduroy Suits 
tackle the ques- 
tion of warmth 
with stunning 
chic. 2-piece. 
$15 




Here's the "Triple-Threat'' Star: 




Sweatei - that 

kick a goal of 
thrifty fashion, 
in turtle-necks, 
V's, etc., in- 
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sets. 
$2.50 
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Half-back 
over the head, 
this new 
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hat, of felt with 
quill trim, $7.50 
fties 59£ to $3.98 



this star n handl Give 'em a coupla hands! 
Full-back perfect-fitting Hanbilt Novelty Suede 
uiih Nan i cuffs, in brown-and-white, black-and- 



H louses run 
for a touch- 
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their colors 
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Plaid and 
check silks. 

$1.98 
to $3.50 



All- 
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Flannel Skirt 
that accurate) 

pass the de- 
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Fullback 




Sport Coats — 

make a long 
end run for the 

goal, because 
they're smrat the 
long year thru, 
whatever the 
season. Fur- 
trimmed or un- 
trimmed. In- 
cluding Ekeo- 
moors. 
$19.50 
to $59.50 

New Jackets of 

corduroy and 
suede cloth, in 
several differ- 
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and colors. At 
this price, it's 
like giving you 
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$4.95 
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Second 
Floor 





PO 






Senior president 
KENNETH GLOSS 




DICK HALL 

Sophomore president 



m 




Hmurrumhta 

($U£Btl 




RUTH ADAMS 

Junior president 




EUGENE GUSTAVSON 

Freshman president 



Issued each week during the academic year. Entered at the >oat Office at Colorado Springs •* Second-Class Matter. 



THE TIGER 



Friday, November 3, 1933 



Pack Bags 
Laundry Bags 
Hikers Supplies 

THE OUTWEST 
TENT and AWNING CO. 



M. 1261 



18 E. Kiowa 



To Maintain 
A Payroll in 
Colorado Springs 




COAL/ 

Phone Main 577 



I ■ : I ■ : : ; ■ ' , : I 1 1 1 1 - 1 1 I ! ill 1 1 ■ ■ ■ I : i : . i : ■ : 



Watch inspectors for C. R. I. & P. Ry. 
and U. P. Ry. 

C.B.LAUTERMAN 

JEWELER and OPTOMETRIST 

FINE 

WATCH — CLOCK 

AND JEWELRY 

REPAIRING 

40 years at 121 North Tejon St. 
Colorado Springs 




i in ii l ii l inn ii mi mini in ii in ii in inn inn ii i ii in ii ii i in ii il in ii in in nil i ii i ii in i 



Same quality work — 
a real Hair cut for 

PETE'S BARBER SHOP 

8 E. Cucharras 

ni ii i i iii i >n> i i iii i !ii i ii{ » ii t ! nn ; > ii inm 



A Typwriter 

— an Aid to Education 

The investment is small — 
payment as low as $4.00 a 
month may be made — and we 
carry every make machine. 



The 

Typewriter 

Man 



125 N. Tejon St. 
Phone Main 95 




ii i ii iiiii M ii i ii i iiiiiiiii iiiin i iiii ii i iii n 







esterii 




the cigarette that's MILDER 

the cigarette that tastes better 



© 1933. Liggett & Myers Tobacco Co. 



IRA C. DUGAN 

Jeweler and Optometrist 

Fine Watch and Clock Repairing 

Eyes Examined — Glasses Fitted 

— Lenses Duplicated — 

Phone Main 1702-J 9 N. Tejon St- 



Quality "Master" Cleaners 

Only one Quality and the 
Price is uniform 

H. A. Thompson 
M. mi 1-8-1-1 10 E. Kiowa 



|pOI>L>EGli: 
^ "INN" ' 

ACROSS FROM MURRAY'S 



THE TIGER 



VOLUME XXXVI 



COLORADO COLLEGE WEEKLY NEWS-MAGAZINE 



Number 7 



♦ e A M P u 



Faculty 

of COLORADO COLLEGE are 
addressing Colorado Educational 
Association groups meeting in Den- 
ver, Pueblo, and Grand Junction 
today and tomorrow. 

Dr. C. B. Hershey goes to Pueblo 
today to address the school board 
there, this evening he talks to the 
Denver alumni club while Thurs- 
day he appeared before the Pu- 
eblo alumni group. 

Dr. Carroll Malone discourses on 
"The Manchurian Situation" be- 
fore the Denver alumni club tonight 
and Miss Dorothy Graves speaks on 
"Spanish Popular Songs" before 
Educational Association. Miss 
Graves is taking a group of stu- 
dents from her classes to sing songs 
illustrating her lecture. 

At Pueblo Miss Amanda Elliss 
adresses the English section while 
Dean Lovitt will speak to the 
mathematical group on "The Rela- 
tion of Mathematics to Higher 
Learning." "Speech education" 
was the topic of W. D. Copeland's 
talk at Pueblo and tonight he lec- 
tures in Denver on "Plans for Pub- 
lic Speaking in Colorado", while 
tonight Dr. Henry B. Dewing ad- 
dresses the foreign language divi- 
sion on "The Windy Plains of 
Troy." 

Prof. W. Lewis Abbott spoke in 
Denver Thursday on "A New Edu- 
cation Philosophy to Accompany 
N. R. A." 



Better Band 

"The COLORADO COLLEGE 
band is coming out of its depres- 
sion without a doubt", Fred G. 
Fink, director, said at the last re- 
hearsal. "The band last year was 
the best in the past five years, and 
the prospects for this year are even 
better". 

One rehearsal a week is the only 
preparation requirement for the 
band. Tuesday is the usual night. 
This year the A. S. C. C. budget 
allots $225 for use for the band 
and this will make possible the trip 
to Boulder on the special train and 
new uniforms. 



Polytechnic 

Paul House is president of the 
Polytechnic club following a recent 
election. Don Huff is secretary and J 
treasurer, Albyn Mackintosh is 
sponsor and Prof. Frank M. Okey 
is faculty advisor. Announcement 
has been made this year that all 
scientists will be invited to meet- 
ings. 



Teutons By Adoption 

of COLORADO COLLEGE, en- 
joyed the weekly meeting of the 
German Club on Wednesday night. 
Two one-act plays were given in 
German by the members. The club 
companion, guide, philosopher and 
friend, Mrs. Sutton of the German 
department, was the author of the 
productions which were well re- 
ceived. 

Activities of the club this year 
are divided between recreational 
advantages and a closer contact 
with German kultur. All who are 
interested in German are cordially 
invited to attend the meetings. 

Newly elected officers for this 
year are President, Dick Hall, 
Vice President, Loretta Kekeisen; 
Secretary, Mary Gilmore; Treasur- 
er, Martin Stelson. 



Special Commendation 

Miss Elizabeth Dewing, sopho- 
more in COLORADO COLLEGE, 
and transfer from Packard Insti- 
tute in Brooklyn, won special com- 
mendation in a poster contest given 
recently by the Business and Pro- 
fessional Women's Club. 

Miss Dewing, daughter of Dr. H. 
B. Dewing, is a student of the 
Broadmoor Art Academy. 



A Railroad To France 

which he had recently built was 
the topic discussed by the self- 
styled "son of Jack Dempsey" at 
a meeting of Dr. Murphey's sociol- 
ogy class recently at t h e Pueblo 
State Hospital for the Insane. Peo- 
ple worth billions of dollars and 
others who were being put on the 
spot by Mussollini were also inter- 
viewed. Dr. Murphey plans trips to 
Canon City penitentiary and the 
county jail soon and the class has 
p I ready visited Colorado Springs 
Day Nursery and Dr. Brady's 
Psychopathic hospital. 



Unrest 

and wonderment are states of 
being which everyone experiences 
at times. If this is in the line of 
vocations it may be settled by pe- 
rusing some of the material on the 
self next to the fireplace in Coburn 
library. The material is changed 
each week, so there is little danger 
of reading the same thing twice. 
For those desiring to find something 
on vocations or for those wishing 
additional material on their inter- 
ests the shelf is especially helpful. 



Popular 

at dinners and gatherings of all 
sorts is the COLORADO COLLEGE 
quartet. Thursday the group com- 
posed of Everet Boerrigter, David 
Bemmels, Don Reid and Curtis 
Westfall sang at the Community 
Chest banquet held at the Alamo 
hotel. They broadcast every 
Wednesday night over KVOR from 
8:45 to 9 o'clock. 



Way Back In 1912 

physical education for women 
became an educational project at 
COLORADO COLLEGE. Miss Sar- 
ah Davis, now teaching physical 
education at the University of Cali- 
fornia, instituted it. Since that 
time the number and variety of 
courses have been increased until 
the women of the college have the 
advantage of complete physical 
education. 

The aim of the department is to 
develop each girl to her utmost 
physical efficiency. Archery, tennis, 
hiking, swimming and dancing are 
emphasized because they have es- 
pecial value for relaxation and 
skillful muscular control as well as 
leisure activity and social value 
after school days. 

In the spring Miss Marion Fezer, 
head of the department, holds as a 
climax to the year's work a horse 
show for the equitation class, a 
swimming meet, a May Fete for the 
dancing classes. Hiking groups will 
climb Pikes Peak. 



Judge In Contests 

William D. Copeland, secretary . 
of COLORADO COLLEGE has 
just completed his annual duties as I 
judge for Colorado in the annual I 
contest for better radio diction, 
sponsored by the American Acad- | 
emy of Arts and Letters. Each year ! 
one radio announcer in the United 
States is selected by vote of t h e 
judges as the best example which 
Americans might pattern after. 
Pronunciation, articulation, t o n e i 
quality, cultural effect and diction 
are the points considered in the' 
contest. 

David Ross, Milton Cross and 
John Holbrook are some of the 
winners of past years. Presentation 
of the medal to the best announc- 
ers will take place Nov. 9, in New 
York. William Lyon Phelps of 
Yale is chairman of the contest 
committee. 



Keeping Up 

To enable the students to keep 
well informed on college activities 
Miss Kampf has introduced into the 
library "University" and the "In- 
tercollegiate Digest." The first is a 
magazine containing activities of 
coeds of other colleges, football, 
fashions, movies, fiction, a bit of 
humor and special features. The 
"Intercollegiate Digest" is a small 
paper in which are unusual stories 
about college problems and rather 
intensive editorials for the thinker. 

The library also maintains a 
shelf of interest to girls seeking vo- 
cational guidance. 



The Pit 

at 8 p. m. Tuesday is the place 
and time of an illustrated lecture 
by Douglas McHendrie, A. B. 
COLORADO COLLEGE, '27. 

Mr. McHendrie, an attorney in 
Trinidad, was a Rhodes scholar in 
Brasenose college, Oxford, from 
1 928 to 1 93 1 , where he studied law. 
He was president of the A. S. C. C. 
in 1926-27. His lecture on "Ox- 
ford and the Rhodes Scholarships", 
will be illustrated by views of Ox- 
ford, its buildings, and student ac- 
tivities. 



Waterdogs 

The biology department of 
COLORADO COLLEGE has re- 
cently shipped 200 waterdogs. or 
to be more scientific, ambystoma ti- 
grina, to the University of Mary- 
land. They will be used for experi- 
mental purposes by Frank J. Figge, 
graduate of C. C. in 1927. He is 
at present engaged in work on the 
glands of internal secretion. He has 
previously collaborated with Dr. 
Gilmore in biological studies. 



The World's A Stage 

and our chance to act in the 
drama of Life is at hand, Dr. Wal- 
lace H. Carver, pastor of the First 
Presbyterian church in Colorado 
Springs, emphasized in his chapel 
adress Tuesday. 

The first act, before the birth of 
Christ, depicts the multitudes sing- 
isg with an air of expectancy. The 
second act shows the life of Christ 
from His birth to His death. The 
third act shows the disciples lead- 
ing the way down the centuries to- 
ward their Master. The last act is 
unfinished, there remains another 
scene: 

"The world is waiting for the 
sons of God, who are the young 
people of the world, to carry on 
this great drama. God's greatest 
glory appears in this drama as an 
inspiration to life." Dr. Carver elo- 
quently pointed out. 



THE TIGER 



Friday, November 3, 1933 



THE TIGER 




Dance Contest 

will feature the Friday night fes- 
tivities at the Silver Glade ballroom 
at the Cosmopolitan Hotel in Den- 
ver, initiating a weekly program of 
Editor LEW CROSBY contests at which students of all 

n . .. „ _ . I colleges in the region will be repre- 

Business Manager Everett Stapleton sented Judge ^ wi] , be appointed 

♦ Homecoming 

too often means that we who should be hosts have a better time 
than those who should be guests. Homecoming is our yearly gesture to 
those who have gone before. Homecoming should find each of us with 
an obligation of the entertainers rather than the entertained. If there is 
nothing gaind in doing for others, that which we will expect in years to 
come. Homecoming should be abolished as an institution which has out- 
lasted its usefulness. Let's show our visitors one of the bigges, friendli- 
est homecomings we've ever had. 



+ Politics 

The most obvious angle of our present "secret" combine system 
of psuedo politics is the fact that they are neither secret nor political 
If the different factions within the combines happen to be mutually 
agreeable at election time, the election is a set-up for the combine with 
the most members. However, as the "most members" means a larger 
split of the offices, the winners are often the losers. Why not hav our 
"secret" combine come out into the open as two political parties. The 
same backing could be had but the systems could be worked to include 
campaign speeches, torchlight parades and other numerous phenomena 
which, though somewhat slapstick, are patterned more after our nation- 
al political circus. If not entirely logical, the system would at least add 
color to a cut-and-dried anachronism. 



NOTICE 
To All Faculty Members: 

The usual C. C. Alumni ban- 
quets, held each year during the an- 
nual Colorado Education meetings, 
are scheduled this year as follows: 
Denver — Nov. 3rd — Olin Hotel — 

6:30 P. M.— $1 per plate 
Pueblo— Nov. 2nd— Blue Bird Cafe 

—6:30 P. M.— 60c per plate 

You are cordially invited to at- 
tend these dinners, if possible. 
William D. Copeland, Secretary. 

Miss Bessie East, Vocational 
Guidance Counsellor for Women, 
will be at Bemis Hall for confer- 
ences the week beginning Nov. 20. 
Appointments may be made through 
the office of the Dean of Women, 
Main 727. 



Rasputin 

was very cleverly characterized 
by Rosalie Spiller and was reward- 
ed by being given first prize at the 
Colonial Costume Ball .held last 
Friday evening in Bemis Commons. 
Elizabeth Heaton and Florence 
Robinson coming as rag dolls won 
second prize and honorable men- 
tion going to Lucille Hampton. 



To avoid conflict of dates, mem- 
bers of the faculty and managers of 
student organizations are requested 
to secure permission for the use of 
any room or building from this 
office. 

W. W. Postlethwaite, 

Treasurer. 



There will be a meeting of THE 
TIGER staff in the Pit, Palmer hall, 
Tuesday at 1:30. Pencils and note- 
books are essential. 



An Original Method 

of teaching biology has been 
adopted in classes of embryologv. 
Clay models of cells are being made 
by the students. They are painted 
in various colors to distinguish 
germ layers. According to Dr. Gil- 
more this is an easier mode of de- 
scription than words. 

X-Ray Experiments 

The photo-voltaic effect of X- 
rays is being determined by Mau- 
rice Griffith in experiments in the 
COLORADO COLLEGE physics 
laboratories. Little has been done 
before using X-rays as the exciting 
radiation. He is working on the 
problem in connection with his 
thesis for his master's degree. 




♦EXCHANGES 

Some funster sent a half dozer 
assorted bottles of milk to the 
rooms of the Arizona football tearr 
after the Okla. Aggie game then 
with the following note: "We knew 
you Wildcats were hiding undei 
false whiskers. Come, Kitties, it's 
time for your milk." — New Mexicc 
Lobo. 



A co-ed asks: "Have yoi 
learned, Henri Longpre, that y o i 
laugh and the school laughs with 
you, but you stay after schoo 
alone?" — Branding Iron. 
••• ••• *•• 

The Tri-Delts at Kentucky Uni- 
versity have placed an NRA sign in 
the window of their bouse: "We 

do our part." — Oredigger. 

■■• ••• ••• 

A very dumb co-ed may be de- 
fined as one who thinks a pilot is 

J a little pie. 

••• ••• ••• 

The proper means of loafing wilj 

. be the object of attainment in a 

I new course of instruction offered 

! this year at Butler University. 
— •»• ••• 

A woman at the University o 1 
Chicago was granted a master's de- 
: gree after she had submitted a the- 
sis on "Four Wavs to Wash Dish- 
es." Columbia University, how- 
ever, went one step farther and 
granted a Ph. D. to the author of 
a dissertation, "The Duties of A 

School Janitor." — Doane Owl. 
■•■ ... .». 

Love, dumbness and faulty in- 
telligence are the reasons for fresh- 
men flunking out of school, accord- 
ing to a dean at the University of 
Nebraska. 



A definition of a professor bv a| 
professor as quoted from the Ken- 
tucky Kernel: "A professor is a 
man who learns more and more 
?bout less and less, until finally he 
can tell you nothing about any 
thing. 



. 



Luncheon 



Popular — and why not - - 



horn outstanding men of each 
school. 

Miss Florine Dickson, campus 
queen and most popular co-ed at 
the University of Southern Califor- 
nia is shown .holding the trophy 
award. Miss Dickson is one of the 
many featured entertainers appear- 
ing with Carol Lofner's band at 
the Silver Glade. 



In 1 732 girls of Salem College! 
could take baths only by special 
permission and at times indicated 
by the instructors. 



Russell Joseph McShane, member 
of the sophomore class of COLO- 
RADO COLLEGE last year, is a 
student in the Liberal Arts college 
of the University of Cincinnati. 



Reed Morgan Simpson, '35, is 
attending Washington university, 
St. Louis, Mo. 



Theta chapter of Gamma Phi Capt. F. C. Hyde, '16, is assiS' 

Beta entertained at luncheon on tant professor of military science 

Saturday before the D. U.-C. C. and tactics at Massachusette Insti- 

game. The Gamma Phis from lute of Technology, Boston. 

COLORADO COLLEGE who were * * * 

guests are; the Misses Julia Sher- Robert Claude Dentan, '28, is 

man, Alice Rhoades, Billie Sulli- doing post graduate work at the 

van. Doris Wylie, Bertha Jayne Yale Divinity school, New Haven, 

Maxeiner, Muriel Hess. I Conn. 



In the early days when Oklaho- 
ma A. and M. College was estab- 
lished, a rule was adopted requir- 
ing all students to leave their fire- 
arms outside the buildings. 

— Teachers College Mirror. 

.«. ■•■ ■•■ 

And so girls and bad boys, tha 
moral of todays' lecture is what 
mamma banana said to baby ba- 
nana, "Stick to the bunch or we'll 
all be skinned." 

— Rocky Mountain Collegian. | 



Frances Elizabeth Morgan is re-j 
maining at home this year, but 
plans to return to COLORADO 
COLLEGE in 1934. 



Friday, November 3, 1933 



THE TIGER 



Paul Dale Pierce, '35, is attend- 
ing the El Paso Vocational school 
in El Paso, Texas. 



*• 



Reward's 

CL/^? Barber 
B Shop 

19 East Bijou Street 







WHICH 



FOR YOU ? 




Left: Maiden Form 
new " Dec-La-Tay 
brassiere, for the rtr, 
"high, wide''* lines * 
important this seaso 
— note its unusual V 
/tainted front line. 



THE SOCIAL CALENDAR 

Friday, Nov. 3 — 

Sigma Chi Tea Dance for Kap- 
pa Alpha Theta 
Kappa Kappa Gamma Pledge 

Dance 
C. C. Alumni Dinner — Olin Ho- 
tel — Denver — 6:30 p. m. 
Saturday, Nov. 4 — 

C. C.-University of Colorado at 
Boulder 
Sunday, Nov. 5 — 

Kappa Kappa Gamma Open 

House 
Quadrangle Association 
Friday, Nov. 10 — 

Kappa Sigma Tea Dance 
"C" Club Dance 
Saturday, Nov. 11 — 
Homecoming 

C. C.-Brigham Young University 
Colorado Springs 
Sunday, Nov. 12 — 
Newman Club 



Right: "Full-Fash- 
wn 9 "theMaidenForm 

hrassiorc that'' Jus like 
astocking"— seamless, 
^skin-smooth? through 

the breast sections. 





» 



M. KAPSCH 



Dealer in 



Left,: An evening vet I 
sion of"Dec-La-Tuv x 
tvith a verylow-swun\ 
back that can be n<\ 
justed la three differ 
rat low necklines. 



Klgtit: This brassiere 
g i /■ e s exceptionally 
good upHJr support to 
the bust, plus dia- 
phragm c o n t i o I 
fry a well-fitted band. 




Loft: One of Maidei 
Form's clever "High 
Waist" girdles tha 
subtly smooths th\ 
hips and at the sami 
time gives the waist 
line a gentle curve. 



■in the iew Htylrn illustrated aliove show you 
there are Maiden Form foundation garments l< 
take care of all types of figures and to suit ever) 
costume need. Each is designed to idealize yam 
figure in terms of fashion's latest demands. Asl< 
your dealer to show you the new Maiden Forms — 
or write for free booklet. Dept. C4 Maiden Form 
Brassiere Co., Inc., 215 Fifth Ave, New York. 



SK 



AT - ALL LEADING STORES 



LOOK FOR THE NAME 



REG- U S FAT OFF 



fWawkmlfowL 

V B kA S S I E R.ES J 



antique! 

Repairing and Refinishing 
furniture 



324% N. Tejon St. 
Telephone M. 471 7-W 






A TIP FOR STUDENTS 

Students who are able to review complete 
notes are much better prepared for exam- 
inations. With ABC Shorthand, which is 
quickly learned in 12 easy lessons, you can 
take lecture and reading notes verbatim. 
Complete course now sells for $1.00 at 

Pikes Peak Book & Stationery Co. 



THE GOLDEN CYCLE 
SHINE PARLOR 

We will close Armistice Day 

GOLDEN CYCLE BUILDING 

Hats Cleaned and Blocked 

TODD COLBERT- Prop. 



CHAPEL CALENDAR 
Tuesday, Nov. 7 — 10:00 a. m. 
Chapel Service — 

A musical program consisting or 
a special organ number by Dr. 
Boothroyd and two sacred numbers 
by Bernard Vessey. 
Thursday, Nov. 9 — 5:00 p. m. — 

The third in a group of the Five 
o'Clock Series of Addresses by 
Dean McMurtry. "Job, The Prob- 
lem." 

The public is cordially invited to 
these programs. 

Carrie Coed's Letter 

Dear Sis, 

with 99.44% of the COLORADO 
COLLEGE population migrated to 
Denver for the big week-end of the 
D. U.-C. C. struggle, little Carrie 
trotted along for the festivities. 
The crowds at the game were es- 
pecially colorful and "spirited", 
and the fact that the Tigers lost 
the game didn't seem to dampen 
D. U.'s enthusiasm a bit. But we 
weren't on the high end of t h e 
score, and I couldn't help feeling a 
little depressed. 

But soon cares and what-not 
were forgotten when we arrived at 
the Silver Glade ballroom of the 
good old Cosmo. Strange to say, 
other people seemed to have had 
the same idea we had, and it 
wasn't long before we were all 
struggling like large-sized sardines 
in a small-sized can. But in spite 
of the mob I managed to catch 
glimpses of some swanky new 
frocks. I wish you could have seen 
"G. B." Blackmail in her dark 
green velvet dinner dress accented 
with antique gold accessories and 
"Cousin" Lucy in a stunning tang- 
erine frock slashed with silver. Can 
you imagine Mary Elizabeth Pitt's 
rnd Ginger Dewey's surprise to find 
themselves dressed as twins in roy- 
al blue wool crepe dinner dresses 
with garnet clips ?nd buckles. Wil- 
he'mina Mienholtz was there in a 
good-looking black and white satin 
outfit. 

It's time to dress for dinner, so 
I must dash. I'll have lots to tell 
you about homecoming next week. 
Till then, 

Carrie. 



CIR.DLIS •CJH.TK. 



ZM$'*m*$ mMmm 



Maiden Form Garments Sold 
in Colorado Springs at 

Kaufmans 



DEPARTMENT STORE 



All Branches of 
BEAUTY CULTURE 



i We Blend Our Face Powders 



To Suit Your Complexion 

KEM-MAR) 

Beauty Shop 

704 N. Tejon. Tel 853 Main 




On 

Candy 
Counters 
Every 
Place 



The Biggest Nickel's 
worth of GOOD Candy 
You Ever Bought. Try 
It! 




For your Convenience 



Colorado College 

TEXT BOOKS 

AND SUPPLIES 

C. C. and Fraternity 

Stationery 

Laundry Bags — $2.00 Each 

Murray Drug Co. 

Across From the Campus 



Let us do the Dirty 
Work This Year 

Expert Furnace Cleaning 
Reasonable Rates 

HEYSE 

SHEET METAL 

WORKS 

219 No. Weber St. 



SHEFF & SON 

SUPERIOR FORD SERVICE 
827 N. Tejon M. 1317 



Smoke Rings 

With a puff, puff here, and a i 
puff, puff there the Beta Theta Pi 
pledges entertained at a Smoker on 
Wednesday evening, Nov. 1 , in hon- 
or of all the fraternity pledge 
classes on the campus. In addition 
to blowing smoke rings, the guests I 
entertained themselves by playing 
ping pong, watching boxing and 
wrestling matches, and by drinking 
cider and dunking doughnuts. 



1 



S 



ee 



jfrefc 



POT — 

SPIGOT 

No Cover Charge 



M 



THE TIGER 



Friday, November 3, 1933 



C^O£ 



i^iLLi/\fpy 

* t ■ Mlkl/ » • * k. Ave 

UlOlAiO /HlNC/ (OtOlA»0 



Hats 
Blouses 



Knitted Sports Wear 



Always a Thrilling Evening at 

e SlLver Ljlaoe 

* *k * 

* cA£w...A * 
* Collegiate * 

* Dance Contest * 

with prominent students from all the colleges 
and universities of the state acting as judges. A 
beautifully engraved silver loving cup will be pre- 
sented each Friday to the most popular couple. 

How many cups will your fraternity or so- 
rority win this season? Come each Friday and 
applaud for your favorite. Participate or not just 
as you like but come and have the time of your 
life . . . There will be unusual entertainment to 
thri 1 1 vou and 



dancing to 

Carol 
Lofner's 

15-picce 
Orchestra with 'tlP 

Florine |jp 

Dickson and 
Larry Cotton 




No Raise 
In Prices/ 

Collegiate nite 
...and the most 
interesting Col- 
legiate Dance 
Contest ever 

held in the Rocky 
Mountain Region 
every Friday at the 



Cosmopolitan Hotel 



Denver's finest hostelry 



Subscribe NOW for The 



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Morning— Evening— Sunday "All The News All The Time" 






Daily Only 
I 5c per week 



Daily and Sunday 
20c per week 



Combination 
35c per week 



PORTS ♦ 



TIGER HUDDLE 

"Chris" Marlowe 

You know, it is mighty easy to 
support a winning team, but let that 
team get off to a bad start and lis- 
ten to the criticisms. Where is that 
C. C. spirit? Now is the time when 
the team as well as the coaches 
need the full support of every 
member of the student body . . . . 
Boulder is plenty worried over the 
game Saturday. Why shouldn't we 
be optimistic? To emphasize this 
we will quote from the C. U. Sil- 
ver and Gold. "In the first place, 
we just can't figure out what's 
wrong with the Tigers. They have 
the same line, with the exception 
of Martin, that they had last year. 
And that line was good enough to 
hold Colorado scoreless. The backs 
are harder and faster than they 
were last year. Right now. it looks 
to us as if the Tigers have a po- 
tentially good grid machine, but 
their spark plugs have been plugged 
up. . . . Saturday, however, may 
be the day when every plug will 
be in perfect order, and the Ben- 
gals working in perfect unison. 
Moreover, "Bully" Van de Graaff 
always gets at least one great 
game out of his team every year 
to upset favorites. Two years ago, 
the Tigers spilled Denver and last 
vear they toppled C. U. and Aggies. 
Every time an opposing coach 
meets the Tigers, he shivers for 
fear that the Tigers are going to 
pull their one great game against 
his team. All in all, the Tigers are 
about due, and when they are due 
?nd play Colorado you can add 
dynamite to T. N. T. and just about 
figure out their power." 

This is the renutation of a 1933 
edition of a COLORADO COL- 
LEGE grid machine. Let's uphold 
this reputation and sret behind the 
team and BEAT BOULDER! 



Driven At Full Speed 

to prepare for the Homecoming 
jame with the strong C. U. eleven, 
the COLORADO COLLEGE Tigers 
after coming through the D. U. 
game in good shape have been 
drilling hard all week in an effort 
to build up a team that may turn 
the cards and again win a game 
that appears to be a set up for 
the upstate followers. In 1932, a 
highlv favored C. U. eleven made 
the COLORADO COLLEGE Home- 
coming a huge success bv taking a 
sound 12-0 beating. The Tiger 
eleven, again the underdogs this 
year, are hoping that history will 
repeat itself, and ruin what appears 
to be a successful Colorado U. 
homecoming. 



SPECIAL TRAIN 

for Boulder and the year's b i g 
game will leave the Santa Fe sta- 
tion at 8:30 a. m. tomorrow, Sat- 
urday morning, and will return im- 
mediately following the game. 

A special $2. round-trip-rate is 
made to C. C. students wishing to 
make the trip. Tickets for the trip 
arc to be purchased at the Railroad 
ticket office. 



Inter-fraternity Basketball 

As the third week of play ends, 
the list of winners has been di- 
minished to two. The Phi Delts and 
the Fijis are the squads having un- 
broken records and the match be- 
tween these two fast teams is being 
looked forward to by the Greek 
followers. 

The Phi Gams have turned in 
two victories the past week with a 
decisive 36-18 defeat over the Del- 
ta Alpha, and Tuesday evening 
turned back the strong Beta five, 
by a score of 27-16. In the other 
games of the evening, the Sigma 
Chi team trounced the Delta Alphs 
by a score of 39-17. 



Scoring 

in every period of the game, the 
strong D. U. Pioneers downed a 
slightly demoralized Tiger eleven at 
Denver last Saturday, by a score 
of 31-0. The Tigers were no match 
for a power driven machine with 
Percy Loecy at the helm and had a 
hard time penetrating the D. U. 
defense. The Tigers looked good 
at times and stopped the Pioneers 
in their tracks which prevented 
several almost certain touchdowns. 



Tiger Cubs 

were sent to their lair last week 
when a strong and more experi- 
enced D. U. Frosh eleven trounced 
them to a tune of 33-0. The C. C. 
squad was materially outweighed 
by the Denver boys and entered the 
game with onlv four substitutes on 
the bench. D. U. presented a 
smooth offense which the Tigers 
were never able to equal during the 
game. 

Between Halves 

of the Homecoming game with 
Brigham Young next Saturday, the 
annual cross country run will be 
staged. Several long distance men 
have been training for several 
weeks and previous records will un- 
doubtedly be shattered. Jack Kintz, 
winner of the run last year will not 
participate which is an added in- 
ducement to new men. Runners 
are urged to be in suit and ready 
for action immediately after t h e 
gun sounds after the first half. 



Friday, November 3, 1933 



THE TIGER 







a sensible package 
10 cents 



(^ranger Rough Cut 

_the tobacco that's MADE FOR PIPES 



© 193$. Liggett & Myers Tobacco Co. 



BISSEL'S PHARMACY 

HENRY E. COPELAND, Prop. 

A Tiger Booster 



Tel. M. 980 Corner Dale and Weber 

PROMPT DELIVERY 



PHOTOGRAPHS 

The Gift that only you can give 
Official Photographer, C. C. Nugget 

PAYTON STUDIO 

30 S. Tejon Phone M. 477-J 



Strachans 

SWEET SHOP 

Bijou and Nevada 



KEYHOLE 
EEPER 



At the first of the week every- 
body was still under the influence 
of a very potent week-end. True to 
the advance dope, everybody de- 
cided to drop in to the Cosmo after 
the afternoon affray had finished it- 
self, and such a mob had never 

een seen before at the inn. 

>•• .». -». 

Everybody and his dogs, aunts, 
and grandmothers were at the jig. 
Several hundred people were 
packed in at tables around a min- 
ute dance floor that became so 
crowded when the band played that 
all one could do was stand on one 
spot and jump up and down and 
cheer. It was a nice sized floor for 
the female solo dancer on the pro- 
gram, however. 

••• ••■ ••• 

Saturday afternoon the boys did 
themselves quite well, we thought, 
except for a few unfortunate slips. 
D. U. has the best team they's had 
years — a regular powerhouse, 
and against such tremendous oppo- 
sition, how could the Tiger boys 

have done any better? 
••• *•> ••• 

And tomorrow is Boulder. No 
one knows. Shall we all join in a 
word of prayer? The D. U.-Boul- 
der game on Thanksgiving Day 
should really be a well-known 
stinker. 



Dirt continues scant and scarce. 
However, the Sigs are complaining 
that Jim Brady doesn't pass the 
cigars now that he has his pin on 
Jane Kimzey. ... a demented in- 
dividual made a brilliant remark as 
he left the room at the Pueblo asy- 
lum after being "interviewed by 
Dr. Murphey's sociology class. . . . 
it was really good but wouldn't do 
to be repeated in a family paper. 
. . . . Tommy Scott's eye looks like 
one of Ted Healy's stooges had put 
a fiinger through it ... . and a huz- 
za to Joe Rustin, the mime. . . . 
quite surprising .... Some of our 
equestrian-minded coeds are re- 
minded of the centaurish cover on 
the current "New Yorker", don't 
miss it. . . . Ye olde keeper express- 
es sorrow for the freshman gal that 
fell for Lots deHolczer. . . . And 
there is a broken flower pot that 
was kicked off of the Adams front 
porch. . . . has that something to 
do with O'Brien having his pin back 
. . . . We're sure many Tigers at- 
tended the D. U. game, but are 
many of the Tigers sure. . . . and, 
as this colyum has been void of 
these things for some weeks .... 
Is Louise Yaden's hair-ribbon tied 
or does she use Sticky Glew? 



THE TIGER 



Friday, November 3, 1933 



Tiresronei 

ONE STOP 
SERVICE 



Let Us 
Prepare Your Car . 
for Winter Driving 



ifiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii^ 



Complete Lubrication 

Motor Oils 

Batterier and Repairing 

Firestone Anti-freeze 

Prestone and Alcohol 



Brake Relining and Adjusting 

Texaco "Fire Chief" Gasoline 

"Red Head" Car Heaters 

Tlwsfaue Tires 

115-121 N. Nevada 
Phone M. 202 



Say Boys — 



PampbelFs 
Barber 
Shop 



IS 

at 



109 East Pikes Peak Ave. 



•£• 111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111114' 



Couture's 

FRENCH CLEANING & 
DYEING CO. 



We Solicit Your Patronage 

218 N. Tejon St. 

Colorado Springs, Colo. 

Phone Main 1288 



W. I. LUCAS 

— HAS— 

EVERYTHING IN SPORTINC 
GOODS— 

"Tigers Always Welcome" 

120 North Tejon Street 
Main 900 



The best way to tell of the 
beauty of Colorado, Stand- 
ley's Color Pictures, Hand- 
Colored — 35 cents up. 



H.L. Standley 

PHOTOGRAPHER 

224 No. Tejon St. 

Colorado Springs 

t 



Reasonable 
Prices 

Dependable 
Service 



We wash everything with 
Ivory Soap. 



<Gh< 




earl 



LAUNDRY 

Phones M. 1085-1086 




COLORADO COLLEGE 

COLORADO SPRINGS, COLORADO 



FULLY ACCREDITED 
COEDUCATIONAL 
NON-SECTARIAN 



VIEW OF SHOVE CHAPEL FROM LEFT 
OF PALMER HALL ENTRANCE 



One of the six LIBERAL ARTS COLLEGES of the country 
on the Harvard Professorship Exchange. 

"A College which has the life and vigor of the West combined 
with the carefulness and standards of the East." 




VIEW OF MOUNTAINS AND CAMPUS FROM RIGHT 
OF PALMER HALL ENTRANCE 



SCHOOLS OF 

ARTS AND SCIENCES, LETTERS AND FINE ARTS 
THE NATURAL SCIENCES, THE SOCIAL SCIENCES 

A sound education at Colorado College amid beautiful and healthful surroundings pre- 
pares the graduate to secure the greatest benefits from life, not alone in technical re- 
quirements of a degree, but in society, recreation, athletics, religion and capable appre- 
ciation of everything worthwhile. 



C. B. HERSHEY, A.M., ED. D., ACTING-PRESIDENT 




HOMECOMING 



BEAT 
B. Y. U. 





SIGMA CHIS 
Winner of 
Float, '32. 



PHI GAMMA DELTA 

Winner of 
House Decorations, '32. 





HOMECOMING PROGRAM 

FRIDAY 

7:30 — Pep Meeting, Cossitt stadium 

9:00 — 'C club All-college dance at Hiawatha gardens. 

SATURDAY 

10:30 — Homecoming parade, forming at Murray's 
12:00 — Alumni luncheon, Bemis hall 

2:30— COLORADO COLLEGE-Brigham Young university football 
game 

5:00 — Reception for alumni by Dr. and Mrs. C. B. Hershey. 

6:30 — Receptions and dinners by fraternities and sororities 

9:00 — Bengal club dance, Broadmoor Nile club 



Issued each week during Uis academic year. Entered at the'on Office at Colorado Springs as Second-Class Mutter 



1 






Pack Bags 
Laundry Bags 
Hikers Supplies 

THE OUTWEST 

TENT and AWNING CO. 



M. 1261 



18 E. Kiowa 



To Maintain 
A Payroll in 
Colorado Springs 




GOAL/ 

Phone Main 577 



>ee 



fvci> 



POT — 
SPIGOT 

No Cover Charge 



llllilllliiiiiilil 



13 



+ 



fioward's 

'Barbe 
Shop 



<L ^Barber 

■ ! 



19 East Bijou Street 



*— 



4 



Flowers for all 
occasions 
Phone Us. 




22 N. Tejon 



Main 214 



THE TIGER 



Friday, November 10, 1933 




i/es _L utze that word 
about cigarettes 



"When I think of milder 
cigarettes nowadays, I al- 
ways think of Chesterfields. 

"Because Chesterfields 
are milder. They've got 



plenty of taste and aroma 
to them but they've got 
mildness too! 

"I smoke Chesterfields 
all day long — when I'm 
working and when I'm 
not, and there's no time 
when a Chesterfield doesn't 
taste milder and better." 




esterfieid 



the cigarette that's MILDER 

the cigarette that TASTES better 



© loss I K.(.i i r ft Myers Tobacco Co. 



IPoi>i>ege> Strachan's 

^ "MN" ' *>« ""mil a 



ACROSS FROM MURRAY'S 



SWEET SHOP 

Bijou and Nevada 



Shampoo and Finger Wave 
50 cents 

MARY SUTTON 
BEAUTY SHOP 



M. 1186 105 E. Cache la Poudre 



THE TIGER 



VOLUME XXXVI 



COLORADO COLLEGE WEEKLY NEWS-MAGAZINE 



Number 8 



♦ Calendar 

FRIDAY, NOV. 10 



Morning and afternoon, registra- 
tration, Administration 
building 

6:00 — Judging of fraternity and 
sorority house decorations 

7:30 — Pep Bonfire in Cossitt bowl 
9:30 — 'C club Homecoming 

dance at Hiawatha gardens 
10:00 — Crowning of Homecoming 

queen at 'C club dance 
SATURDAY, NOV. 11 
10:30 — Homecoming parade. The 

parade forms on Tejon St. 

at Platte Ave. 
10:59 — Bomb set off as a signal 

for the parade to halt. 

There will be silence of 

one minute after which 

which taps will be blown. 
12:00 — Alumni banquet at Bemis 

hall 

2:30 — Homecoming game, COLO- 
RADO COLLEGE versus 
Brigham Young university. 
5:00— Phi Delta Theta alumni 
banquet. 
Kappa Alpha Theta alumni 

tea. 
Kappa Kappa Gamma 

house warming. 
Beta Theta Pi open house. 
Delta Gamma alumni din- 
ner. 
Gamma Phi Beta high tea, 
with Founder's day cere- 
monies, immediately 
afterwards. 
Sigma Chi open house. 
Phi Gamma Delta buffet 
dinner. 
6:00 — Delta Alpha Phi Homecom- 
ing banquet. 
6 : 30 — Kappa Sigma Homecom- 
ing banquet. 
9 : 00 — Bengal club Homecoming 
dance at Broadmoor Nite 
club. 



Dear Alumni: 

On behalf of the student body, 
I welcome you back to COLO- 
RADO COLLEGE. Since the prep- 
arations for Homecoming are most 
elaborate this year, you are assured 
of a perfect visit. Homecoming is 
the opportunity for you, the former 
students, and ourselves, the pres- 
ent student body, to become better 
acquainted and to instill in each 
other a greater success for COLO- 
RADO COLLEGE through the me- 
dium of those traditions which we 
have learned and are learning at 
COLORADO COLLEGE. Yours 
for a greater HOMECOMING. 

Harry E. Fontius, Jr., 
Homecoming chairman. 



Election 

of class officers saw the entire 
student body of COLORADO COL- 
LEGE working for their respective 
candidates. Both factions or parties 
presented their ballots to voters of 
the doubtful group and when the 
counting had ceased the class offi- 
cers for women were divided be- 
tween the Kappas and the Thetas, 
each sorority getting four. Of the 
offices held traditionally by the men, 
Beta Theta Pi held three, Phi Delta 
Theta and Delta Alpha Phi two 
each, with Kappa Sigma putting 
Kenneth Gloss in the highly-prized 
presidency of the Senior class. 

The feature race of the election 
saw Gloss defeat the pre-election 
favorite, John Mihalick, co-captain 
of the football team, in a close fin- 
ish, with the outcome in doubt un- 
til the final ballot had been counted. 

Complete results of the election 
follow with winners in black face 
type: 

SENIOR CLASS 

President — Kenneth Gloss, John 
Mihalick 

Vice President — Gratia Belle 
Blackman, Sally Tompkins. 

Secretary — Marie Hoag, Evelyn 
Richter. 

Treasurer — Carl Maynard, Clar- 
ence Kehoe. 
JUNIOR CLASS 

President — Ruth Adams, Harriet 
Kearney. 

Vice President — Budd Anderson, 
Carl Garrett 

Secretary — Harriet Engel, Doro- 
thy Skidmore 

Treasurer — Henry Finger, Dave 
Griffith. 
SOPHOMORE CLASS 

President — Richard Hall, Harold 
Berg 

Vice President — Virginia Berger, 
Jane Kimsey. 

S e c r e t a r y — Elizabeth Evans, 
Winifred McBroom 

Treasurer — Fred Miles, Fred 
Simpson. 
FRESHMAN CLASS 

President — E u g e n e Gustavson, 
Hobart Corning. 

Vice President — Margaret Simp- 
son, Dorothy Weaver 

Secretary — Miriam Rothgerber, 
Elizabeth Richter. 

Treasurer — Robert Glew, Curtis 
Perryman. 

*<«X~X~X~XK"X"X"X"X"X"X">' 

President and Mrs. C. B. Hershey 
will be at home to alumni of COLO- 
RADO COLLEGE at 24 College 
Place Saturday following the C. C- 
B. Y. U. football game. 



Greetings 

It is a genuine pleasure to wel- 
come the Alumni and friends of 
the college on this annual Home- 
Coming occasion. 




ACTING PRESIDENT 
C. B. HERSHEY 

We greet you - - - 

During the opening weeks of the 
college year, many of you have ex- 
pressed your good wishes and have 
asked many questions about possi- 
ble ways to make a more effective 
representation of the college work 
to the people of Colorado and else- 
where. This makes your coming 
most welcome. 

Your presence on the campus, in 
the college buildings, in your fra- 
ternity houses and lodges and at 
the game is a witness of your abid- 
ing and, I believe, your increasing 
devotion and loyalty to the College. 
This is primarily a festive and ath- 
letic occasion but it is our hope 
that you will not refrain from con- 
ferring with any member of the col- 
lege organization on the more ac- 
ademic and serious aspects of the 
college program. Our task is a com- 
mon one for the entire college fam- 
ily and we are always glad to weave 
you into the fabric of our delibera- 
tions. 

We greet you and welcome you. 
C. B. Hershey 
Acting President 



The Presidents 

of all the organizations on t h e 
COLORADO COLLEGE campus 

will be the guests of Mrs. Louise 
W. Fauteaux. dean of women, at 
the Presidents' dinner, Saturday, 
Nov. 18. 

President C. B. Hershey will be 
the speaker of the evening and a 
short explanation will be given of 
A. W. S. and A. S. C. C. The pur- 
post of the dinner, which is spon- 
sored by the Associated Women stu- 
dents, is first, to establish a tradi- 
tion of honoring these officers, and 
second, to promote closer relation- 
ships between all groups in COLO- 
RADO COLLEGE. 



♦ Dance 

Homecoming Crowds 

will meet and flow to the 'C 
club dance at Hiawatha gardens 
tonight. The crowning of the home- 
coming queen will take place amid 
the applause of students and alum- 
ni. Dancing will then be continued 
to the music of Johnny Metzler's 
orchestha. Admission will be 40 
cents per person. 

The queen will be chosen from 
the following: Betty Foster, Eliza- 
beth Richter, Mary Jean MacDon- 
ald, Elizabeth Evans, and Helen 
Walker. 

Last year Olive Bradley was giv- 
en the crown, being elected by bal- 
lots printed in THE TIGER. It was 
held at the Broadmoor Nite club. 

This year the queen was elected 
at the regular class elections but 
the result will not be announced 
until the dance. 



Editor of the Tiger, 
Dear Sir; 

It is gratifying to witness the de- 
velopment of well laid plans for 
Homecoming. This year especially 
the enthusiasm and genuine interest 
in making this annual affair an out- 
standing event in the life of the col- 
lege is shared by all on the cam- 
pus. 

The Alumni though scattered far 
and wide do appreciate the intelli- 
gent interest and energy put forth 
by the Homecoming Committees to 
make this year's re-union most at- 
tractive. Thru the November issue 
of the Alumni Bulletin and the 
many meetings scheduled to be held 
this month by the Chapters of the 
Alumni Association we are inform- 
ed of the progress and needs of the 
College. 

The best token of our continued 
interest, appreciation, and affection 
for our Alma Mater is evidenced by 
the fact that we will be with you 
for Homecoming. 

Cordially yours, 

Lester Griswold 

Vice President, 

C. C. Alumni. 



First Civic Concert 

A bass solo and a duet by the 
two altos were the high points of 
the first Civic Music association 
concert at the city auditorium Mon- 
day night. The association present- 
ed the Russian Symphonic Choir. 

The program was divided into 
three parts, the first being a group 
of religious songs. The second was 
a group of classical compositions, 
for the most part by Russian mas- 
ters. The third was a number of 
folk songs that had been arranged 
by the director. 



THE TIGER 



Friday, November 10, 1933 



^gtfUA** 'orou,.,^* 



In Denver 

Every Friday Night 
is 

University 
Night 



l^s 



3: 



at 



CASANOVA 

Make a big impression on the 
little girl. Take her to a real 
night club where the music fairly 
"sizzles" . . . the crowd is congen- 
ial, and if you care to eat well , you 

know the Brown Palace cuisine is famous. 
Justly so ! Justly so ! 

HARRY OWENS 

AND HIS 

Casanova Band 



Dinner and Dancing 
7 to 1 a. m. 

$1.50 per person 

(No cover charge with dinner) 

Dancing without Dinner 

8 to 12:30 

50c per person 



CASANOVA 

at the Brown Palace Hotel 




New Contract 

Panhellenic, a committee repre- 
senting the sororities of the campus, 
is an organization to which the 
sororities are responsible. At pres- 
ent Panhellenic is revising the Rush 
Contract, which lays down the 
rules for all sorority rushing. This 
contract will be submitted to t h e 
sororities in the spring and as ac- 
cepted by them will be put in effect 
for summer rushing and rush week 
in the fall. 



Large W. A. A. Program 

Since the beginning of the year, 
under the leadership of Francesca 
Hall and with the assistance of 
Miss Marion Fezer, W. A. A. has 
successfully carried out a program 
of tennis tournaments, hiking, top- 
sy turvey tennis, teniquoit or deck 
tennis, and a play day for the 
high school girls of the region. 
Sports now being concentrated on 
include horse-shoe and shuffle- 
board. 



New Theta House 

New sorority houses seem to be 
the fad on the COLORADO COL- 
LEGE campus. Kappa Alpha Theta 
will present plans for a new house 
at the Homecoming tea Saturday in 
honor of Contemporary and Theta 
alumnae. 

Truman St. Clair has prepared 
the plans. The lodge is to be of the 
Nineteenth century type of English 
architecture and will be located 
near the new Kappa Kappa Gam- 
ma building. Construction will be 
started in the near future. 



Pledge 

Kappa Alpha Theta pledged 
Mary Jean McDonald Wednesday 
night. After the pledging services 
the junior class members of Theta 
were hostesses at a tea given in 
honor of their new pledge, and for 
all pledges and actives. 



Faculty Dines 

Members of the COLORADO 
COLLEGE faculty held a dinner in 
Bemis hall last night at which com- 
prehensive examinations were dis- 
cussed. 

This afternoon another faculty 
meeting will be held at 4 o'clock 
and at this meeting the COLORA- 
DO COLLEGE students who will 
represent the school in the Rhodes 
Scholarship examinations, will be 
chosen. 



"Tea For Three 

or Thirty" was the interesting 
topic presented by Dean Louise W. 
Fauteaux to members of W. A. A. 
Wednesday night. Her talk was 
followed by a discussion, a reading 
of the constitution of the National 
Federation of college women by 
Pauline Johnson, and group sing- 
ing. 



Just Across from the College 
Expert Work NRA Prices 

THE 

COLLEGE BARBER SHOP 

103 E. Cache la Poudre 



The Lipscomb 
Motor Company 

Automotive 
Specialists 



Tires 
Gas 



Supplies 
Oil 



109 N. Cascade Ave. 
Telephone M. 4273 



Have your Nugget photo- 
graphs made now and avoid 
the rush 

^emcrv 

STUDIO 

Fine Portraiture 
Across from the campus 



HOW ABOUT A STUDY 
SIDELINE? 

What's that? More study? Well, yes 
and no. We've started a new Radio 
Course for you "bugs" who like to 
build or tinker with radio's. It's 
called "Theory of Radio," and is 
in charge of an expert. Classes daily 
from 8 to 9 a. m. Night School 
Classes Mondays and Thursdays at 
7 p. m. 

Blair's Business College 



DeGraff Bide. 



Ph 



one 



160 



Your Good 

Home-coming 

Snapshots 

To get the most possible 
from your Kodak pictures 
— any time — the films 
must first have GOOD 
Developing. That's why 
so many leave exposed 
films here. 




ejon 



Friday, November 10, 1933 



THE TIGER 



STARTS SATURDAY NOVEMBER 11 (ARMISTICE DAY) 

CONTINOUS SATURDAY FROM 11:00 A. M. TO 1:00 A. M. 



FOOTLIGHT 



ONLY 
WARNER BROS. 
COULD MAKE IT! 

And you'll gasp in amaze- 
ment that even the creators 
of "42nd Street" and "Gold 
Diggers" could pack so 
much entertainment into 
one picture — and make it 
entirely different! 




ANY SEAT 




ANY TIME 




Beauty chorus of 300 in 
sensational dance numbers 
staged under water — 1000 
thrills and surprises — and 
20-star wonder cast with 

JAMES CAGNEY 
RUBY KEELER 
DICK POWELL 
■OAN BLONne« ■ 

ANY SEAT 



25c 



ANY TIME 



What They Are Doing 

The class of '33 of COLORADO 
COLLEGE is doing work in various 
fields, as is shown by the following 
representative list. 

Josephine Dickison and Marian- 
na Sackett have fellowships in 
chemistry at Mills college, Califor- 
nia. Frances Smith is studying at 
the University of California, Ber- 
keley, Library school. Darcy Shock 
is employed in the Dow Chemical 
Co., Midland, Mich. Siegfried 
Gross and James H. Turner have 
fellowships in chemistry at Califor- 
nia Tech. Jane Sutton has a fel- 
lowship at Western Reserve univer- 
sity in social work. Harold Schultz 
is studying at Iowa university; Mar- 
tha Herbert is at the University of 
Paris; Margaret Hevse is at Ro- 
chester university; James Dodson 
is at Princton: Lucia Weaver is at 
the Denver library school. Lewis 
Januarv is studying at the C. U. 
Medical School; Marion Deutsch is 
attending the Boeing Aeronautic 
school in California; John Bennett 
is doing graduate work in political 
science at the University of Illinois. 

Nat Walker and Henry Wershing 
are forestry supervisors at the C. 
C. C. camp. Rav Fries and Owen 
Owens are coaching freshman foot 
ball at C. C. Annie Mary McCann 
is technician at the Presbyterian 
hosnital in Denver. 

The following are teaching 
school: Vona Brown. Fruita; Mar- 
garet Wolever, Brandon: Margaret 
Tohnson, Ordway; Almira Attane, 
Manc.os: Mariorie Gilbert, Falcon, 
and Louise Buckley, Hartsel. 

The following members of t h e 
class are taking graduate work at 
COLORADO COLLEGE: Tohn 
Erickson, Jack Kintz. Albvn Mac- 
kintosh. Charles Mackintosh, Geor- 
gia Pickett, Sarah Holls, and John 
Smith. 



Chaco Canon Slides 

Major students of the depart- 
ments of sociology and physics 
were guests of Professor and Mrs. 
Paul E. Boucher at their home, 
2312 North Cascade, Sunday eve- 
ning. Others present included Pres- 
ident and Mrs. C. B. Hershey, Pro- 
fessor and Mrs. W. Lewis Abbott, 
Mr. and Mrs. W. W. Postlethwaite', 
and Howard Olson. 

The program for the evening 
consisted of a film slide picture tour 
of Mesa Verde National Park and 
Chaco Canon National monument. 
The film slides were taken by Dr. 
Boucher during a trip made this 
summer. Those of Chaco Canon 
show something of the work of Mr. 
Postlethwaite who was making ex- 
cavations at the time of Dr. Bouch- 
er's visit. A considerable number 
of the 300 slides show various fea- 
tures of the Sun Kiva, one of the 
largest to be found in the South- 
west. 



THE TIGER 



Friday, November 10, 1933 



THE TIGER 




Editor LEW CROSBY 

Business Manager Everett Stapleton 

+ School Spirit 

is a fine thing if it is directed into the right channels, but when it 
costs COLORADO COLLEGE more than $100.00 it is certainly mis- 
guided. Year after year the high school prank of stopping up the key- 
holes of the doors in Palmer goes on. It takes several men nearly a day 
to clean out the locks, and $100 is a conservative estimate of the amount 
expended in cleaning them and in replacing them as the plaster wears 
out the lock cylinders. Such pranks are boring to say the least. 

Students cry about tuition being high. It is such thoughtless, silly 
pranks that make it high. Why not be original at least? 

♦To The Alumni 

who are this week returning to old friendships and familiar sur- 
roundings of "way back when," we extend the good old right hand of 
good fellowship. Since our first contact with COLORADO COLLEGE, 
your pictures, adorning the walls of dormitory, fraternity home, C club 
rooms and past publications, together with the "bull session halo" that 
keeps your deeds alive down through the years, have made you seem 
as one of us. You originated the traditions which mean so much to us 
todav. It was your handiwork which has given to the present students 
of COLORADO COLLEGE a heritage of colorful background, second to 
none in the Rockv Mountain Conference. You have shown us the way. 
And working; together we can give as much to the future. Howdy — 
and the best of good times. 



College Y 

"The COLORADO COLLEGE 
Y. M. C. A. has been very flourish- 
ing in years gone by, and has a 
great chance to become so again, 
said Dr. Carroll B. Malone last 
night. 

"Since the war," he said, "there 
has been too much outside interest 
on the campus, but there is no rea- 
son why there could not be an or- 
ganization of the students for such 
work as was done before. There 
should be some organization of vol- 
untary religion on the campus be- 
sides chapel, which often seems 
compulsory. If the COLORADO 

COLLEGE Y. M. C. A. could get a 

group together, and work in con- 
junction with the churches of the 
region, there is no reason why it 
would not become one of the most 
influential of the college organiza- 
tions." 



Quartet Busy 

The COLORADO COLLEGE 
quartet will sing Saturday noon for 
the alumni banquet at Bemis hall 
and on the Armistice day program 
at the City auditorium. 

The school year has been a busy 
one thus far for the quartet. It has 
appeared on numerous club pro- 
grams, at banquets and on church 
programs. Last spring a trip was 
made to California. The group is 
heard over KVOR each Wednesday 
night at 8:45. 

Members of the quartet are Don- 
ald Reid, Everet Boerrigter. Curtis 
Westfall and David Bemmels. 



Musical Chapel 

Something different in the way 
of chapel programs was given 
COLORADO COLLEGE students 
Tuesday when organ and vocal 
numbers were featured. Bernard 
Vessey, Colorado Springs lyric ten- 
or, Dr. Frederick Boothroyd, Shove 
chapel and Grace Episcopal church 
organist, and the COLORADO 
COLLEGE choir furnished numbers. 

Panis Angehcus — Bernard Ves- 
sey. 

The Bells of St. Anne du Beau- 
pre — Dr. Frederick Boothroyd. 

Where'er You Walk — Bernard 
Vessey. 

What Are These That Are Ar- 
rayed in White Robes — The Choir. 

Galled To Washington 

Miss Alice van Diest, secretary 
of the El Paso county relief com- 
mittee, member of the state relief 
board and assistant professor of 
sociology at COLORADO COL- 
LEGE, has been called to Washing- 
ton. D. C , to a meeting of the civil 
works administration, which is put- 
ting two million men to work as its 
aim. 

Miss van Diest will leave for 
Washington Sunday. 



Personals 

Wybom Foote, *21, went to An- 
gelo Scott's wedding in Kansas City 
last month. Angelo is editor of the 
Iola, Kan. Register and Emmerson 
Lynn, '20, is business manager of 
the same paper. Emmerson is mar- 
ried to Ruth Scott, and they have 
a family of four children. 

Mary Strachan, '30, had the 
leading role in "Mary the Third" a 
play given by the Drama League in 
Colorado Springs. 

Miss Ruth Morrison, '21, former- 
ly president of the COLORADO 
COLLEGE Alumni association, is 
now librarian in the Los Angeles 
junior college library. For several 
years, Miss Morrison was librarian 
in the Raton, high school. During 
the summer she represented a pub- 
lishing house and traveled exten- 
sively thru the Southwest. 

Calvin Thierfelder, ex '29, is now 
in the Los Angeles County Purchas- 
ing and Stores department. His ad- 
dress is 227 W. 120th Street. 

George Frank, ex. '25, is the pro- 
prietor of Stewart's pharmacy in 
Durango. 

Harold Drake, ex '30. secretary 
of the El Paso county democratic 
executive committee has been nam- 
ed assistant state treasurer in Colo- 
rado. He is now a senior in t h e 
Westminster Law school. 

Marianne Elser. ex '27. has open- 
ed a dacing studio at the Broad- 
moor Art academv. 

Gene Cervi, ex '29. and his bride 
visited in Colorado Springs recently. 
Cene is a reporter on the Rocky 
Mountain News in Denver. 

Lillian Degenfelder, '78, is teach- 
ing in the Los Angeles county 
schools. 

Bill Young, '24, is'teaching chem- 
istry in University college of Los 
Anfeles. 

Kenneth Ode, 75. Ph. D.. Dart- 
mouth. '32. is publishing a series 
of articles m physiological optics. 

Lowell Pierce, '20. attended the 
summer school at Colorado univer- 
sity this summer. His address is 
1009 Madison, San Diego. Calif. 



NOTICES 
Coburn library of COLORADO 
COLLEGE will be closed all day 
Saturday, Nov. 11, on account of 
Armistice day. 

■ •■ -a. -». 

THE TIGER staff will meet in 
the Pit, Palmer hall, Tuesday at 
1:30. 

^» tm ••■ 

All you hikers! Don't forget the 
hike to "Many Pines Chalet" Sun- 
day morning. If you plan to attend, 
please register with Eleanor Hast- 
ings, 3694-M or with Professor 
Penland by Saturday afternoon at 
the latest. 



Founders' day services will be 
given Saturday evening at the Gam- 
ma Phi Beta house in celebration 
of the founding of Gamma Phi 
Beta sorority Nov. 11, 1874. 



Entries for the Cross-country run, 
which will be held between halves 
of the COLORADO COLLEGE- 
Brigham Young football game, must 
be in the office of Jo E. Irish, grad- 
uate manager of athletics by noon 
Friday. 



At Marauette all students living 
in fraternity houses have their 
names, characteristics, and peculiar- 
ities listed with the police. 

Some people have stopped hid- 
ing money in the mattress. The 
dollar has been rising and falling 
so much that the people have been 
tumbling out of bed. 



Oriental Dancing 

Oriental dancing and music will 
be used by Stowitts to illustrate a 
lalk on the theater in Java, at the 
Rroadmoor art academv. Saturday, 
Nov. 11. at 4:30 o'clock. 

Stowitts was a former dancing 
partner of Pavlova and on Pav- 
lova's death went to the orient. In 
Java and India he studied theater, 
art, painting and the court dances. 
He understands oriental culture, its 
philosophy and art. 

His lecture-recital has been re- 
ceived enthusiastically in manv 
places in this country and abroad, 
especially in I ondon where the II- 
lustrated London News devoted a 
whole section to his pictures and 
paintings. 



International Relations 

Recognition of Russia was fav- 
ored by the convention of Interna- 
tional clubs of the Rocky Mountain 
district held at Provo, Utah, Fri- 
day and Saturday. Free but con- 
trolled trade without tariff barriers 
was also recommended by the con- 
vention. 

COLORADO COLLEGE Inter- 
national Relations club was repre- 
sented at the annual meeting by Al- 
fred Heinicke and Leonard Sutton, 
and they were instrumental in 
bringing the meeting to Denver for 
1934. There were 65 delegates 
from 18 clubs present. The United 
States is divided into 12 districts. 
There are 444 International Rela- 
tion clubs in the United States 
alone and a total of 556 in t h e 
world, including groups in Canada, 
China, Syria, Cuba. 

The Carnegie foundation for the 
abolishment of war is t h e factor 
which led to the organization of 
the clubs and their work. A $10,- 
000 fund has been set aside by the 
Carnegie fund for the promotion of 
clubs. 



Mr. and Mrs. Iwao Fukushima 
and two children sailed Nov. 3 for 
Japan on the President Coolidge 
liner, where he will be engaged in 
work until 1935. Mr. Fukushima is 
an alumnus of COLORADO COL- 
LEGE, class 1919. and did gradu- 
ate work in physics at Dartmouth 
college and the University of Min- 
nesota. 



He heard no evil, spoke no evil. 

and saw no evil why? 

He was deaf, dumb and blind. 
— New Mexico Lobo. 



Friday, November 10, 1933 



THE TIGER 



Alumni Clubs Active 

Alumni clubs in various sections 
of the United States are active in 
many ways. Picnics, meetings, 
banquets and other functions are 
regular features of the clubs. 
Homecoming, the one time in the 
whole year when the alumni desire 
most to be on COLORADO COL- 
LEGE campus, is the time when 
some of the clubs are most active. 
Those who are too far away to 
reach Colorado Springs Friday and 
Saturday are planning get-together 
meetings, with all the pep of a 
Homecoming. Clubs whose mem- 
bers are within reasonable distance 
of the college have held meetings 
a week or so previous to the big 
weekend. 

SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA 

The COLORADO COLLEGE 
graduates and former students in 
Southern California are planning a 
big meeting for Homecoming night, 
Saturday, Nov. 1 1 . Mrs. Ruth Col- 
lins Wade, '17, secretary-treasurer 
of the club says, "We're planning 
to hold a dinner dance — 'we' be- 
ing the C. C Alumni Association 
here in Southern California — and 
would like to plan it for the night 
of the day you celebrate Homecom- 
ing at COLORADO COLLEGE — 
a consolation party for those of us 
who can't go back. Anyone any- 
where near Los Angeles can get 
particulars about this dinner dance 
by 'phoning our permanent secre- 
tary, Suoma Lleino Lyons, reached 
at the telephone, Twinoaks 9677, 
Los Angeles". 

DETROIT 

In accordance with a custom 
started several years ago, the 
COLORADO COLLEGE people in 
and around Detroit will meet o n 
Homecoming night to celebrate the 
big day. This meeting will probably 
be held at the home of Mr. and 
Mrs. Frank Mahan, 16 Poplar Park, 
Pleasant Ridge, Royal Oak, Mich. 
WASHINGTON, D. C. 

The alumni in and around Wash- 
ington will have a big meeting to 
celebrate the annual Homecoming. 
They will be awaiting the news of 
the outcome of the "C. C."- Brig- 
ham Young game. Miss Anna P. 
Cooper, 1028 Connecticut avenue, 
Washington, D. C, is in charge of 
arrangements. 

COLORADO 

An annual get-together was held 
by alumni in Durango, Saturday, 
Oct. 7. Current events and reminis- 
censes of the college were main 
features of the program. Mrs. Mar- 
gart Kuntzen Graham, '15 was 
elected president. 

Pueblo held a banquet Friday, 
Nov. 3, and Denver held a banquet 
Saturday, Nov. 4. The two clubs 
expect to have the majority of their 
members at the Homecoming fes- 
tivities. 



"Blue Moon" 

A new dramatic group known as 
the "Blue Moon players" has just 
been organized, in which COLO- 
RADO COLLEGE students and 
alumni are largely represented. 

The first play produced will be 
"Zee-Zee" by Ann Murray. One 
play will be produced each month. 

The director of the venture is 
Miss Ruth Langston who has pre- 
viously been with the Little Theater 
movement in Kansas City, Mo. The 
aim of the organization is to devel- 
op into a professional repertory 
company. Among the COLORADO 
COLLEGE people actively engaged 
in the group are: Mrs. Daisy Rose, 
the Misses Jane Wahtola, Gratia 
Belle Blackman, Kay Livingston, 
Elizabeth Dewing; and the Messrs. 
Wendel Carlson, Ralph Smith, Jack 
Kintz and William Haney. 



McClurg Poems Published 

COLORADO COLLEGE has re- 
cently published the collected 
poems of the late Virginia Donaghe 
McClurg, Doctor of Literature and 
Officer of Public Instruction of 
France. This was the first time in 
the history of the college that the 
poems of a single author have been 
published by it. 

COLORADO COLLEGE accord- 
ed Mrs. McClurg the degree of Doc- 
tor of Letters, honoris causa, in 
1928, and President Mierow said, 
"Mrs. McClurg is an explorer, lec- 
turer and poet." She addressed 
many groups at the Columbian ex- 
position and was honored with the 
distinction of being awarded the 
Golden Palm of the French acad- 
emy. Her historical writings deals 
with the f ascinatisg story of this 
western country in its manifold as- 
pects. She mastered the sonnet 
form and has been hailed as start- 
ing a new school of poetry. 

The volume of her poems, 55 in 
number, contains 36 poems devoted 
to Colorado Springs and Colorado. 
It contains the sonnet "Colorado" 
which has been pronounced the best 
description of the centennial state. 
Her "Stars and Stripes" received a 
letter of praise from Theodore 
Roosevelt. 

Mrs. McClurg cultivated her 
English from the reading of the 
King James version of the Bible, 
and the plays and sonnets of Shake- 
speare. 

Vocation Survey 

The occupational study made by 
Miss Bessie East, vocational coun- 
selor, of the women graduates of 
COLORADO COLLEGE from 1928 
thru 1932 shows that out of 110 
women, 32 are teaching, 22 are 
married, 21 are in commercial 
work, six are librarians, four are 
in social work, one is a nurse, one 
is a saleswoman. 

Miss East will be here for con- 
ferences the week of Nov. 20. 



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'WAY BACK WHEN 



Oct. 31, 1919 

Apparently there were no fra- 
ternity and society celebrations giv- 
en in honor of the alumni at the 
fourth homecoming. If the report 
of the Oct. 31,1919 TIGER is cor- 
rect, everybody attended a v e r y 
"peppy" barbecue given by the 
Sophomores in Cossitt. The affair 
was labeled "A round trip to Hell 
and back for 75 cents." The pro- 
gram for the evening was as fol- 
lows: 

1 . Music from Proserpina's Pipes 
(Fink's Orchestra). 

2. "Enter" — Pres. Biggs of Soph- 
omore class. 
Sophomore Class Song. 
"Words" — Spirit of Prof. Be- 
mis. 

Demons' Dance — Sophomore 
girls. 

"Boiling Pep" — Spirit of Prof. 
Palm. 

8. "Heaven" — Junior Class. 

9. Admission to Hades — Fresh- 
man Class. 

10. Ascent to Earth. 

1 1 . "Eat, drink, and be Merry, for 

tomorrow we die" — All. 
12. Music — More of the Pipes. 



Nov. 10, 1922 

"An informal tea party and 
dance was given at the 'Sigma Chi' 
house this afternoon at four o'clock. 
The party was given in honor of 
the alumni who have returned for 
Homecoming. 

"The chapter is particularly in- 
debted to Mr. and Mrs. Lennox 
whose efforts were largely respon- 
sible for a very enjoyable social 
hour." 



Nov. 14, 1922 

The local chapter of Pi Kappa 
Alpha gave an alumni breakfast 
for their "returned alumni" at their 
chapter house last Sunday morn- 
ing. It was a good old get together 
and many old times were discussed. 
The alumni present were Carlton 
Dein, Robert Miller, and Kenneth 
Kingsbury. Four men from the 
Boulder chapter were also present. 
They were: Oldaker, Taylor, Mc- 
Nemey, and Loudan. 



Nov. 14th, 1922 

Contemporary Club entertained 
at a tea for its alumnae immedi- 
ately after the Boulder game, at 
the Club House. The guests were 
Mrs. Ella Warner Fauteuax, Ruth 
Lewis, Mrs. Kate Kitely Jonson, 
Mrs. Evelyn Campbell Seeley, Mrs. 
Lucile Wakefield Neuswanger, Mar- 
jorie Crissey. Olive Hensley. Helen 
Kirkwood, Anna Maud Garnett, 
Eilene Carrick, Gladys Bell, Doro- 
thy Svveet, Priscilla Nicholson. Ruth 
Gilliland, and Marian Ward. 



Oct. 21, 1924 

"The Phi Gams gave a dinner at 
the Acacia Hotel for their members 
and alumni. The following alumni 
and guests visited them over the 
week-end: Linger, Harvey, Ryan, 
Jack Taylor, Bruce, Hart, Powell, 
Parker, Sheperd, Stiles, Thompson, 
Peterson, Freyschslog, Simmons, 
Mcllvaine, Strain, Williams, Evans, 
Chick, Dern, Woodworth, Chiles, 
John Taylor, Newsanger, Patter- 
son, McHendrie, Bickford, Bortree, 
Scribner, Griffith, Jacobs, Cole, 
Barney, Cover, Williams, Knowles, 
Lewis, Frost, Rudolph, Armstrong." 



Oct. 20, 1926 

"Coming as the first big social 
event of the Homecoming program, 
The Growlers Club dance is sched- 
uled to take place at the Antlers 
hotel immediately after the Sopho- 
more Barbecue tonight. 

"Given with the purpose of se- 
curing funds to finance the pur- 
chase of new jackets for the club, 
the affair will serve to arouse a 
storm of pep for the Boulder game 
tomorrow." 



Nov. 5, 1926 

The members of the Phi Delta 

Theta fraternity entertained at a 
Homecoming banquet at their chap- 
ter house last Saturday evening. 

The fraternity house was beau- 
\ tifully decorated with greens and 
i 'mums," and the college colors. 
The alumni and guests present 
were: Mr. and Mrs. H. H. Schultz, 
Mr. and Mrs. Burr Crockett, Mr. 
and Mrs. Tom Farrel, Mr. and Mrs. 
John Carter, Mr. and Mrs. Glen 
Lowrie, Mr. and Mrs. Bailey. Mr. 
and Mrs. Biersworth. Mr. and Mrs. 
Loesch, Mrs. Will Reinking, Mick- 
ey McBride, Wes Hamilton, Gene 
Broyles, Carl Brumfield, Mai Mac- 
Dougall, Don MacDougall, M. 
Crockett, Jerry Sabin, Sid Rob- 
inson, Bob Nelson, T. W. 
Ross, Bradley Kidder, Walter Ker- 
bel. Arbor Fuller, Harvey Reinking, 
Marvin Reinking, Wallace Gibson, 
Bob Grant, Perry Greiner, Rev. R. 
B. Wolf, Mr. G. Simpson, Al 
Thompson, Frank Simpson, Walter 
Wood, Stewart Beresford, Joe 
Marsh, The Misses Eleanor Nickell, 
Maxine Hunter, Harriett Bumstead, 
Isabel Postlethwaite, Dorothy 
Chambers, and Mr. and Mrs. Col- 
dren. 



Nov. 5, 1926 

"The Kappa Sigma fraternity 
held a homecoming banquet at the 
chapter house Saturday evening. A 
large number of members and alum- 
ni attended. The house was dec- 
orated in the college colors, place 
cards were miniature footballs on 



Friday, November 10, 1933 



THE TIGER 




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the back of which was printed the 
menu. The program was given by 
the fraternity pledges: Franklin 
Emery, Lawerence Brown, Clarence 
Downing, Ed Parker, Frank Moss, 
Frank Ray, Homer Bruce, Cecil 
Bender, Edward Volmer, Frank 
Seeley, Harold Weaver, Charles 
Justis, Thomas Jones, Stanley Grif- 
fith, Eugene Irwin. Music was fur- 
nished by Darwin Coit's orchestra." 

-•- .«* *<>* 

Oct. 21st, 1927 

On Friday afternoon, the Hypa- 
tia will entertain the alumni and 
active members of all girls Liter- 
ary Societies, at an informal tea to 

be held at Bemis Hall. 

.». .*. .«. 

Oct. 21st, 1927 

The Minerva Society entertained 
at a delightful Tea at the Club 
House in honor of the returning 
alumni for Homecoming. 



/ho at- 



Nov. 15, 1929 

"Zetalethian alumnae 
tendded the society's Homecoming 
breakfast at the Broadmoor hotel, 
last Saturday morning included: 
Verla Parker, lone Ward, Hazel 
Martin, Blanche Horsley, Mrs. 
Cook, Mary Kirby, Bessie Shepherd, 
Marjorie Mason, Anita Osborn, 
Wilma Charles, Dorothy Rose, Urth 
Brown, Jo Hetherly, and Marjorie 
Morrell." 



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Nov. 13, 1923 

The alumni of Beta Theta Pi were 
entertained at a dinner following 
the homecoming game. Among 
those present were Hubert Ayers, 
Jerry Bunker, George Cuthbertson, 
Bob Buringame, Jesse Caldwell, 
Guy Deffke, Hugh Gilmore, J. E. 
Fuller, Albert B. Dworak, George 
Scott, Charles Taylor, Elmo Wat- 
son, Chuck Bullock, Larry Green- 
lee, Cecil Graves, C. E. Hedblom, 
Pete Holm, Ed Hughes, Gale Reed, 
Frank Mobley, Ian McKenzie, Tom 
McCaffery, Robert Thompson, 
Frank Nelson, Ed Honnen, William 
Harder, Wesley Cooper, Floyd 
Blick, Russ Morris, Earl McTavish, 
Stanley Birdsall, Ralph Bayness, 
John Haymes, Frank Kiffin, Tin 
Aitken, Earl Lyons, Ted Thomas, 
Dr. Crouch, Bill Saphold, Al Ami- 
don, Dana Burch, Cecil Mcintosh, 
and Dr. Hopkins. 

Nov. 13, 1923* 

The first Alumni All-College 

luncheon was as much of a triumph 
as was the football victory. 550 
alumni attended the luncheon, 
which was served in Cossitt Gym- 
nasium, and from all reports a 
good time was had by all present. 
Representatives were present from 
all but two of the classes beginning 
with '98, who responded in turn 
with their class songs and yells. The 
luncheon committee had arranged 
the seating of the guests by class 
colors, thus grouping members of 
each class together. 



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Friday, November 10, 1933 





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Cole-Sands Motor Co. 

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Reuler's 

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Colorado College 

Cits 

Welcome 

And extend greetings 



COACH VAN DE GRAAFF 



Friday, November 10, 1933 



THE TIGER 






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Martin Cafe 

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Prompt Pharmacy Co. 

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Adams Motor Co. 

Quality Cleaners & Dyers 

Pikes Peak Fuel Co. 

The Strang Garage Co. 

D. F. Law Co. 

Colorado Springs Sporting Goods 

Golden Cycle Shine Parlor 

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ACTING PRES. HERSHEY 



10 



THE TIGER 



Friday, November 10, 1933 



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BEFORE AND AFTER 

THE GAME 

Hoff=Scbrocdcr , $ 

Cafe, Cafeteria, Soda Fountain, Luncheonette 

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LEST WE FORGET 

"Christopher" Marlowe 
with apologies to Robert Burns 
Should Tygre Homecomings be for- 
gott 
And never brought to min'? 
! Should Tygre Homecomings be for- 
gott 
And the wins of other times? 

For aid Colorado C. my dear 

For auld Colorado C, 
We'll take a couple of wins yet 

For auld Colorado C. 

+ 1923 

COLORADO COLLEGE VS. 
UTAH UNIVERSITY 

"The best dish of the Homecom- 
ing week will be served up to the 
alumni and students of COLO- 
RADO COLLEGE THIS Saturday 
in the form of the Utah Aggie 
game." 

C. C— 7 Utah— 6 

T h e COLORADO COLLEGE 
Tigers, using every bit of strategy, 
fight, and football technique pos- 
sible, outgained and outfought a 
bigger team, the Utah University. 
The game was without parallel in 
the history of Washburn. 
+ 1924 

COLORADO VOLLEGE VS. 
Boulder 

"To look at the situation square- 
ly, the odds are heavily against the 
Tigers. C. C. played a great game 
against Utah, but to win over Boul- 
der, she should and must play a 
better game than that." 

C. C— C. U— 26 

Fighting against tremendous 
odds, the Tigers went down to de- 
feat before the powerful C. U. 
eleven. At no time during the con- 
test was there any real doubt as to 
the outcome. 

♦> 1925 
COLORADO COLLEGE VS. 

Colorado Aggies 
"With the Homecoming celebra- 
tion only a few days away, the 
question of C. C.'s chances for a 
championship becomes a vitally im- 
portant matter. The Tigers have not 
won an undisputed title since 1910, 
and it seems that at last their golden 
opportunity is here. But with all 
these pleasant prospects we must 
not forget that the so-called "gon- 
falon" is not in Colorado Springs 
as yet. There are eight conference 
teams who are anxious to "twist 



the Tiger's Tail." 

C. C. 3 — Aggies 7 
"Before a crowd of 5500 Home- 
coming spectators, the fighting Tig- 
ers held ? 3-0 victory over the Col- 
orado Aggies for 56 minutes of the 
most hotly contested game ever wit- 
nessed at Washburn. 

♦ 1926 

COLORADO COLLEGE 

vs. Boulder 

"At two o'clock Saturday, the 
new stadium will be dedicated and 
immediately following, the big event 
of the day will take place — the an- 
nual Tiger-Boulder game. Dope 
points now to a favorable chance 
of the Tiger finishing with his much- 
grasped-for tail still untwisted." 
C. C.-21 C. U.-0. 

Before a crowd of 6.000 enthusi- 
astic Black and Gold Homecoming 
spectators, the Tigers reached the 
height of fans' expectations, and 
defeated the University of Colorado 
displaying one of the greatest grid- 
iron exhibitions in the list of the in- 
stitution, and dedicated the new 
stadium and glorious victory over 
that ancient foe, Boulder. 

4> 1927 
COLORADO COLLEGE 
vs. Montana State 
"Led by Capt. Field Phelps, star 
of many Tiger victories by reason 
of his educated toe and well round- 
ed line of work, the Tiger team is 
sure of good leadership. 

C. C.-28 Montana State-7. ( 
Dutch Clark was the dread of the 
Bobcat eleven. "Dutch" tore around 
the ends, cracked through the line, 
and passed the oval with amazing 
accuracy. 

A 1928 
COLORADO COLLEGE 
vs. Boulder 
"With the outcome of the state 
football championship probably 
hanging upon the outcome of this 
contest between COLORADO COL- 
LEGE and the Colorado University 
eleven on Washburn Saturday, ap- 
proximately 2.000 students are ex- 
pected from Boulder on a special 
train. In addition a large number of 
Silver and Gold supporters are ex- 
pected by auto to witness the most 
colorful gridiron classic of the 1928 
season. 

C. C.-19 C. U.-24 

Embodied in this numerical result 



5 Friday, November 10, 1933 



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THE TIGER 



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STAGS 75c 



WELCOME ALUMNI 

Dance at 

BROADMOOR MITE 6L>U£> 



CORONADO CLUB BAND 



SATURDAY NITE NOV. 11. 



V 



J 



are the thousand and one disap- 
pointed hopes and batered memories 
for a Tiger title to C. C.'s pigskin 
honors. 

* 1929 
COLORADO COLLEGE 

vs. Utah University 
"Bear stories" eminating from the 
Tiger lair during the first of t h e 
week did not sound over encourag- 
ing as to the physical condition of 
the Tiger team for their biggest 
game of the year." 

C. C.-3 Utah- 12. 

Eleven fighting Tigers, represent- 
ing COLORADO COLLEGE, went 
down in a glorious defeat yesterday 
when they fought the Utah U. crim- 
son tide for four quarters of pure 
and hard football to hold them to 
the lowest score of any team in the 
conference this year. 
*> 1930 
COLORADO COLLEGE 
vs. Boulder 
"The greatest football rivalry be- 
tween any two teams in the Rocky 
Mountain Conference exists between 
the University of Colorado and 
COLORADO COLLEGE. It will be 
Homecoming at C. C." 

C. C.-13 C. U.-14 
"Our Colorado" sounded like a 
funeral dirge Saturday when hun- 
dreds of old grads sat with tears in 
their eyes after a fighting, clawing 
Tiger went down to defeat at the 
hands of a weaker Silver and Gold 
team from Colorado University in 
Ipne of the biggest Homecoming 
^celebrations ever held at C. C. 

♦ 1931 
COLORADO COLLEGE 

vs. Utah University 
"Climaxing the 13th COLORADO 
COLLEGE Homecoming will be the 
annual gridion battle between 
"Bully" Van de Graaff's fighting 
Tigers and the champion Utah Uni- 
versity Redskins." 

C. C.-6 Utah-28. 
Once again the Tigers have gone 
down to defeat before Utah Uni- 
versity, 28-26 but several times 
pushed them back into their own 
territory and nosed the ball over 
the Utah goal line — the ambition 
of every conference team, but an 
achievement of the chosen few. 
+ 1932 
COLORADO COLLEGE 
vs. Boulder 
"Fresh from three straight wins, 



COLORADO COLLEGE meets the 
tricky University eleven at Wash- 
burn field tomorrow in the feature 
of the Bengals home season." 
C. C.-12 C. U.-0. 
Taking advantage of every break, 
an inspired Tiger team turned back 
the powerful Boulder aggregation 
1 2-0 at Washburn last Saturday be- 
fore a colorful Homecoming crowd. 
* 1933 
COLORADO COLLEGE 
vs. Brigham Young 
A fighting COLORADO COL- 
LEGE Tiger, snarling from two 
stinging defeats is out for revenge 
this week-end with Brigham Young 
in what is expected to be one of 
the greatest Homecomings ever 
staged at C. C. 
For auld Colorado C, my dear 

For auld Colorado C, 
We'll hang it on old B. Y. U. 
For auld Colorado C. 



Only Alumni Collection 

Everett Jackson '14, is the only 
alumnus to leave a collection to 
Coburn library. He left the sum of 
$1,000 for the purchase of scien- 
tific books. 

Jackson died Jan. 5, 1924, of 
injuries sustained when he fell 
from a 300 foot cliff. He was a 
Rhodes scholar and joined an am- 
bulance unit in England at the out- 
break of the war. When the United 
States entered the war, he returned 
home and joined the heavy artil- 
lery. His rise in the service was 
rapid and he was discharged with 
the rank of major. 

Oldest Living Graduate 

of COLORADO COLLEGE is 
John Roberts Pickett of the class of 
1884. In fact, he is the class, being 
the only one to graduate that year. 
Mr. Pickett now lives at 505 Wyom- 
ing street, Pasadena, Cal. He is a 
retired business man. 

The first class to graduate from 
the college was that of 1882, with 
two members, Frederick Wells 
Tuckerman, who died in Septem- 
ber 1924, and Parker Sedgwick 
Halleck, who died Oct. 20, 1929. 

In 1882 Cutler academy and 
COLORADO COLLEGE were under 
the same roof, the academy being 
a preparatory school. In the two in- 
stitutions were 122 students. While 
the college was started in 1874 it 
was part of Cutler academy 



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THE TIGER 



Friday, November 10, 1933 




TIGER HUDDLE 

"Chris" Marlowe 
Today and tomorrow, the cam- 
pus of COLORADO COLLEGE will 
be graced by the presence of many 
an "old Tiger", who once spent 
four fleeting years here, and then 
went on into real life, there to make 
a faint, irregular scratch in the 
progress of time. Some of our old- 
er alumni will say that their col- 
lege careers were miniatures of 
their actual achievements. They 
will say to us that although we 
can't and will not realize it now, 
we are in the process of living and 
we will not very in later life from 
the ruts in which our unconcerned 
neglect or sincere endeavor place 
us during these four years. . . . 

WELCOME GRADS! 
I am certain there has been some- 
thing wrong with our fair institu- 
tion these past few weeks. Some- 
thing lacking that was so common 
last fall? It's Cutler — Cutler bell 
hasn't rung for many a moon. One 
is almost inclined to believe there 
is no school spirit (or where are 
the freshmen?) But alas! there is 
a tradition at this institution that 
Cutler is rung only after a victory 
has been chalked up. Perhaps it 
will ring tomorrow afternoon when 
we ... . 

BEAT B. Y. U.! 

Homecoming is a great thing. It 
is the time when Tigers young and 
old. reminisce in that famous "hud- 
dle" such as ... . "Now when 
I was on the varsity" — or .... 
"Now, fellows, — when I was a 
pledge. . . . Ah yes — common 
phrases heard during Homecoming 
Week — We really like it — And on 
an occasion like this we pause in 
our daily deliberations and say . . . 
WELCOME, GRADS! 

It was fifteen years ago tomor- 
row an armistice was signed, whist- 
les blew, bells rang out, guns shot, 
drums beat, and hearts rejoiced. 
Why don't we take up where the 
general population left off those 
fifteen years back, and really cele- 
brate tomorrow? Win or lose, we 
have a fighting team and a fighting 
chance. Let's declare war all over 
again and .... 

BEAT B. Y. U.l 

To the 1933 Tiger squad, we, 
the students of COLORADO COL- 
LEGE, owe our utmost admiration 
and gratitude. This year, above all 
years, should we stand firmly be- 
hind the team. For a small, broken 
squad (the smallest in Bengal his- 
tory) to go out upon a field of bat- 
tle with defeat staring them in the 
face, is no easy feat to accomplish. 
Bill to keep up that Tiger spirit 
and hard fight which is a distin- 



guished characteristic of former 
COLORADO COLLEGE teams, is 
even harder. It is to those fighting 
Tigers of the past that we dedicate 
this page and repeat. . . . 
WELCOME, GRADS! 
We must not, however, forget 
our friendly competitors of the 
Rocky Mountain Conference; 
sportsmen and courteous hosts, 
Boulder's kindly greetings in their 
Homecoming program. Their sin- 
cere praise of this and former teams 
must ever be in evidence that while 
we battle for supremacy on the 
gridiron one afternoon, that for the 
before and for the year to come 
we advance together, friends and 
fellow students of neighboring in- 
stitutions. Keeping this in mind, we 
must. . . . 

BEAT B. Y. U.! 




WILLIAM T. VAN de GRAAFF 

He's a Tiger - - 

The C. C. Tiger has been 
coached by some good men in its 
day, but the greatest of them all is 
its present mentor, William T. Van 
de Graaff. His teams are acknowl- 
edged to be the smartest and best 
coached in the Rocky Mountain 
Conference. 

"Bully" was outstanding in his 
student days at the University of 
Alabama, and later continued to 
scintillate on the football team at 
the United States Military Academy 
at West Point. He is a member of 
Phi Beta Kappa, a rare combina- 
tion of brain and brawn. 

Claude Rothgeb coached the 
Bengals in the good old days of 
shin guards, etc. He was a class- 
mate of Prof. Daehler'sat the Uni- 
versity of St. Louis. "Rothy" is 
now at Rice Institute at Galveston, 
Texas. 



Steam-Rolled 

There can be little or no doubt 
that old King Touchdown, the su- 
preme deity of football, occupies a 
most prominent place on the bench 
of the side having the heaviest re- 
serves. 

Saturday's game at Boulder was j 
no exception to this rule of the 
power of numbers and weight. Be- 
fore a crowd of about 3500 spec- 
tators, in a falling snow, the Uni- 
versity of Colorado defeated the 
courageous COLORADO COL- 
LEGE football team 26-0. 

The first period opened with C. 
I C. kicking off to Counter of State 
who ran the ball back twenty-eight 
yards. In the first two quarters C. ' 
U. several times had the ball in C. 
C. territory but fumbles, which | 
were quickly taken advantage of by 
the Tigers, together with the long 
accurate punts of Mack Reid kept 
the Silver and Gold from becoming 
a real menace. Andrews attempted 
a place kick in the first quarter, 
but was rushed and the try blocked, 
and in the second quarter, after an 
offensive with Lam and McGlone 
carrying the ball, Stenzel, in turn, 
threatened with a place kick but 
his try went wide of the bar. 

This half saw C. U. making some 
fair gains, but losing the advantages 
either because of fumbles or due to 
the yardage gained by Reid in the 
exchange of punts. The Tigers, at 
all times, were ably defending 
against the onslaughts of the Silver 
and Gold, and at the sound of the 
gun for the rest period, it was any- 
body's game with the honors evenly 
divided. 

Crippled by injuries received in 
this and former games, exhausted 
by their Herculean efforts in the 
first half, eleven tired Tigers faced 
a refreshed and reinforced Univer- 
sity of Colorado team at the open- 
ing of the third quarter. Williams 
hardly able to carry on. Mihalick 
weakened by injuries, the entire 
eleven exhausted by their courage- 
our fight in the first half, neverthe- 
less, they stubbornly contested the 
State team during the third quar- 
ter. 

Andrews kicked off to Wagner 
of C. U. and this able player aided 
by Counter made good gains for 
the State until they finally placed 
the ball on C. C three yard line, 
and Counter went over for the 
score, Wagner converting for the 
additional point. Again Andrews 
kicked off to Wagner, who later 
passed to McGlone and together 
with Counter, reached the C. C. 
twenty-eight yard line when the 
Tigers braced and held, taking the 
ball. The Tigers punted out of dan- 



ger but again a pass to McGlone 
brought the Silver and Gold to with- 
in threatening distance of the Ti- 
ger's goal, and on the next few 
plays State scored. Stenzel adding 
the extra point. The third quarter 
ended with the score University of 
Colorado 14, Colorado College 0. 

In the final quarter of the game 
C. U. using a flock of fresh line- 
men carried the ball to a third 
touchdown, Wagner going over for 
the score. An attempt to score the 
extra point by a play through the 
line failed. With the fourth quar- 
ter half over C. C. opened an aerial 
attack, but a very promising offen- 
sive was stopped when Bailey of 
State intercepted a pass, the Silver 
and Gold then taking the ball and 
carrying it over for the final score 
of the day. An attempt to score the 
extra point by a pass failed and the 
game ended with the score C. U. 
26, C. C. 0. 

Pluck, and grit had held the 
powerful Silver and Gold team to 
no score in the first two quarters, 
but strength is not everlasting and 
spirit cannot carry exhausted and 
crippled flesh, and these few words 
explain the results of Saturday's 
game. 




HAROLD FUNK 

Funk hails from Wray. 

While at Wray, he earned four 
letters in football. He was also a 
member of the Wray Hi-Y club, and 
in his senior year he was elected 
as president of this organization. 
He is now a member of Kappa Sig- 
ma fraternity and the C Club. 



Friday, November 10, 1933 



THE TIGER 



13 



When you thinly of Candy 
think of 

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Make Life Sweeter ' 



SOLD AT ALL LEADING STORES 
EVERYWHERE 




"RED" LeMASTER 

"Red hails from the smoky city. 
While in high school, Raymond 
won three letters in football and 
two in basketball. Last year by his 
consistent playing "Red" won the 
outstanding tackle on the Tiger 
squad. He is a fast man and a 
"catch 'em sure" tackier, and his 
coverings on punts is phenomenal. 
He is a member of Phi Gamma 
Delta fraternity. 



Tiger Belt Buckles 




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More Fun ! ! Kappa Alpha The- 
ta's are giving a subscription dance 
and bridge at the Broadmoor Nite 
club, Friday, Nov. 17. Tickets will 
be 55 cents. Johnny Metzler's or- 
chestra will play. 



Fraternity and Sorority songs 
formed the highlights of the tea 
dance given by Sigma Chi for Kap- 
pa Alpha Theta Friday. 



NOW 
PLAYING 



AMERICA 



NOW 
PLAYING 



Graduate 

of COLORADO COLLEGE in 
the School of Sociology and doing 
work in R. F. C, social welfare, 
case histories, etc., is Jane Sutton, 

'33. 

Miss Sutton has a fellowship at 
Western Reserve college in Cleve- 
land where she is doing social work, 
for the most part, with children. 
.«. ••- ••- 

Joe Perkins, '35, is employed in 
the office of Ballard and Magdanz, 
Denver. 



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of choice in distinctive, dignified or smart and swanky styles 
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Colorado Springs Colo, 



Janet Moshisky, '35, is ill in a 
sanatorium in Carmel, Cal. 
••• ••> «•• 
John Tate Riddell, Jr., '35, is a 
student at the California Institute 
of Technology. 

•«. .«• .»- 

Robert DeWitt "Duke" Tucker, 
'31, is manager of the Boettcher- 
Newton office in Omaha, Nebr. 



Robert Warren. '28. is superin- 
tendent of schools at Kremling, 
Colorado. 



The Engagement 

of Miss Winifred McBroom to 
Mr. Frederick Stone was announced 
Monday evening at the Gamma Phi 
Beta house. Miss McBroom is a 
transfer student from Ft. Collins. 
Mr. Stone is a member of Alpha 
Tau Omega fraternity at Ft. Col- 
lins. No date has been set for the 
wedding. 




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14 



THE TIGER 



Friday, November 10, 1933 



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iimit of smartness ... if you'll watch color 
harmonies carefully. Consult our Holeproof 
Lolor Ensemble Book for authoritative new 
costume and accessory shades and their cor- 
rect relation. See our vvindows this week. 

In nosier/ we suggest especially a new 
ali-ccccsion shade — Holeproof Gadabout 
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evening, in lovely chiffons and walking 
sheers — and new, youthful, special- 
purpose ftyles— 

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One Foot Outside The Gate 

At an early hour being fully 
clothed as a means of getting stu- 
dents out of bed — this is one of the 
many amusing ways of enforcing 
the mixture of spartan and easy- 
going elements in life at Oxford, as 
described by Douglas McHendrie, 
in an interesting talk about Oxford 
university Wednesday night in Pal- 
mer hall. 

Mr. McHendrie is a Rhodes 
scholar from COLORADO COL- 
LEGE, enabling him to talk about 
Oxford from intimate personal ac- 
quaintance. He described the social 
life in the colleges, of which tea- 
time, with its informal gatherings 
is one of the most pleasant ele- 
ments. He mentioned the many 
and varied clubs, as well as t h e 
great student interest in national 
politics. 

From an American point of view, 
the Oxford student is very easy-go- 
ifg in his rttitude toward sports. 
He regards them as a vigorous and 
pleasant way to spend his after- 
noons. The captain chooses the 
team, and there are no professional 
paid coaches. Substitutions are 
never made once a game has start- 
ed, altho a badly injured player 
may drop out, leaving his team 
short-handed. 

Brilliance rather than hard work; 
promise rather than achievement 
are at a nremium in Oxford schol- 
arship. The primary aim is to turn 
out gentlemen of wide attainments 
rather than profound scholars. 
Much freedom is allowed students. 
Under the nersonal and largely in- 
formal guidance of his tutor, t h e 
student lays out his three-year 
course of study, leading to the ex- 
amination for the bachelor's de- 
degree. These examinations are of 
a stiffness undreamed of in Ameri- 
can colleges. Much of the inten- 
sive studying is done in vacations. 
According to Mr. McHendrie. 
the life of an American Rhodes 
scholar at Oxford is compounded of 
hard study, pleasant contacts with 
an old and beautiful culture, and 
travel on the continent in vacations. 



! School of Music 

The School of Music of COLO- 
RADO COLLEGE begain in 1879 
as a conservatory of music under 
the tutelage of Prof. H. T. Wagner, 
with but slight contact with COLO- 
RADO COLLEGE, consisting of 
credit for a course in "Harmony." 
i The conservatory gained after 
the building of Perkins fine arts 
building which was dedicated Jan. 
127, 1900, the twenty-fifth anniver- 
sary of COLORADO COLLEGE, by 
a four-day celebration consisting of 
an art exhibition under the man- 
agement of Leslie J. Skelton, a 
dedication concert and other exer- 
cises. 

In 1906 the conservatory became 
a school of music, with gradual ex- 
tension of college contacts. About 
10 years later it was made a de- 
partment under COLORADO COL- 
LEGE with all the privileges, ex- 
cept participation in the benefits of 
the college endowment. The main 
aim of the department has been to 
offer a sound education in music. 

The school has an average atten- 
dance of about 75 students. The 
present period of economic depres- 
sion has reduced the number 50 
per cent, as music is still to bear the 
stigma of being a "frill", and is 
the first subject to be exposed to 
retrenchment. 

Euterpe, the music society, is 
about 20 vears old. It has a club 
room in Perkins Hall and meets 
semi-monthly. 

Among the graduates are Grace 
Wade, Robert Berryhill, Mavbelle 
Pillar, Ben Pitler, Detroit; Charles 
Righter, University of Iowa; Dean 
Trembly, Colorado Springs; Louise 
Humbel, Trinidad; Helen Huffman, 
Limon; Clifford Kolsrud, Helen 
Thompson. Vona Brown, Fruita, 
Jack Kintz. 



"Job, The Problem" 

"Job, the Problem," was the title 
for an address given by Dean 
James G. McMurtry Thursday, at 
the Shove Memorial chapel. 

This was the third in a group of 
the Five o'clock series to be given 
by Dean McMurtry. 

Everyone may attend these pro- 
grams. 



Friday, November 10, 1933 



THE TIGER 



15 



f 



KEYHOLE 
EEPER 



Celebrating Homecoming with a 
few old home gleanings, we quote 
the following from a 1922 Tiger: 

"Hypatia (now Kappa Kappa 
Gamma) 

The Hypatia meeting was an en- 
tertainment in honor of the actives 
given by the pledges. The program 
was "Medley of Poetry", the num- 
bers of which follow: 

Psalm of Life — Delma Drake. 

Merlin and the Gleam — Esther 
Patrick. 

Visions of Sir Launfal — Elma 
Jane Clopper. 

Pippa's Song — Dorothy Roedell. 

The Hiwayman — Rita Fist. 

Nonsense Novel by Stephen Las- 
sack — Lucy Fast." 

••» >•> ••• 

Minerva and Contemporary 
(DG and Theta now) were both go- 
ing quite highbrow having papers 
and discussions on Bernard Shaw 
and Oscar Wilde. 



From the 1922 homecoming is- 
sue: "The Tigers game of games is 
always with Boulder. C. C.'c over- 
head game is enough to dazzle any 
team. The business men and town 
folks will be out 100% strong and 
backing the fightingest bunch of 
Tigers that this school has ever 
seen." Daintily put but not quite 
applicable today. 



Five years earlier in 1917, Doug- 
las Fairbanks was playing at the 
local cinema palace, the Princess, 
in "The Man From Painted Post." 
This is his latest picture and is full 
of his characteristic kick, pep, and 
humor. Also added attraction, Ros- 
coe 'Fatty' Arbuckle in a two reel 

smile fest "At Coney Island." 
••• ••• ••• 

The spring of 1917 saw agitation 
for a crop growing movement on 
the campus. Mr. Harold Huston 
submitted a letter which had full 
detailed plans for raising five to six 
acres of corn and beans on the lo- 
cal grounds. It would no doubt 
swell the market in peashooters but 
the esthetic value of cornstalks 
waving around the Palmer porch is 
doubtful. 



After seventeen years of activ- 
ity, we can really see progress in 
one line at least. In the November 
24, 1916, issue of THE TIGER, 
there is one column editorial plead- 
ing for fraternity tables — Cossitt 
was too expensive, it was no fun 
eating there, and the food was 
"awful". So the old adage holds 
true, "Wait and time shall bring you 

everything." 

.•- -«. .«. 

Some of the trickiest things in 



these old editions are the illustra- 
tions! You should see the pen and 
ink drawing adorning the front 
page of a fall number. It is adver- 
tising the second all-college dance 
in history and portrays an aged 
couple dancing very stiffly, with a 
little quip underneath them, "Yes, 
the faculty will be there, too." 

Evidently the biggest event in 
years, the Tiger waxed very enthu- 
siastic and declared "that every 
single solitary student connected 
with this institution will be in Cos- 
sitt gym, demonstrating his own 
particular version of the "math cut 
or the "college slide." 

"The Dover Road" 

is still spoken of with awe by 
former Tigers as the first production 
of the newly formed Koshare of 
COLORADO COLLEGE in 1925. 
The unit resulted from a merger of 
the old Girl's Dramatic Club and 
the co-ed Pearson's Dramatic Club 
and according to Arthur G. Sharp., 
Jr., present faculty adviser and dir- 
ector of Koshare, the first produc- 
tion "was a honey, being only ex- 
celled in point of amateurish action 
and lack of finesse by the 1931 
freshman frolic, The Torch Bear- 
ers." 

The first director of Koshare des- 
tinies was Roger Stanton, followed 

i by Harold Blaine in 1926 and Man- 
us Royzen in 1928. 

Arthur G. Sharp, Jr., C. C. '26, 

j has been dramatic director for Ko- 
share since 1929. Among his more 

I notable productions have been 
"Lightnin' '32, "Black Flamingo" 

! '32 and '33, and "R. U. R." in '33. 
Sharp authored the 1931 Denver 
tournament winner "Private 
Krutch", with which Koshare went 
on to win fourth place in the nat- 
ional tournament held at North- 
western U. in '32. "Art's" favorite 
show is the Christmas pageant-play, 
"Eager Heart," which is one of the 
oldest traditions of COLORADO 
COLLEGE, playing is 25th annual 
performance this Christmas. 

Koshare's tentative billing for the 
present season includes the "Dam- 
sel in Distress" produced Oct. 25 
and 26, and future presentations of 
"Children of the Moon," "Death 
Takes a Holiday," and "Eager 
Heart. 

The name "Koshare", ever a 
source of wonderment to the un- 
initiated, is a derivation from the 
Pueblo Indian Koshare, or inner 
clan, whose duty was at once to 
judge and to entertain the tribe. 
Bendolier, eminent authority on 
Southwestern Indion Lore, calls 
them the "Delight Makers." Mem- 
bership is open to any COLORADO 
COLLEGE student and is earned 
through points gained by work in 
play production. The name of the 
organization has since been adopted 
by the dramatic organization at the 
University of New Mexico. 



OCIAId 



SOCIAL CALENDAR 
Friday, Nov. 10 — 

C club— All College. 
Saturday, Nov. 11 — 

Homecoming. 

Parade. 

Alumni luncheon. 

C. C. — Brigham Young univer- 
sity. 

Reception at the president's 
Home. 

Teas and suppers by sororities 
and fraternities^ 
Sunday, Nov. 12 — 

Newman club. 
Tuesday, Nov. 14 — 

Euterpe. 

A. W S. board. 
Friday, Nov. 17 — 

Sigma Chi tea dance for Kappa 
Kappa Gamma. 

Delta Alpha Phi tea dance. 

Delta Gamma dance. 

Kappa Alpha Theta dance. 

W. A. A. initiation. 
Saturday, Nov. 18 — 

C. C.-Mines 

Presidents' dinner. 

Phi Delta Theta dance. 



Hospitality 

was the key note of the open 
house held by the members of Kap- 
pa Kappa Gamma on Sunday, Nov. 
5. The activities of the day started 
at 2:30 o'clock with the dedication 
of the new house, in which the 
alumnae, active and pledge mem- 
bers participated. The guests were 
invited to the open house for the 
hours from 3:00 until 9:00 o'clock. 

Those standing in the receiving 
line were Miss Alice Hersom, Presi- 
dent of the active chapter, Miss 
Dena Coyle, President of the Alum- 
nae Association, Mrs. Morris Esmi- 
ol, President of the Building Board, 
Mrs. Olin P. Lee, Treasurer of the 
Building Board, Mrs. Gratia Black- 
man, President of the Mothers' 
Club. The members of the faculty 
who were in the receiving line were 
Dean Fauteaux from 3:00 until 
4:00 o'clock, Mrs. Charles Hershey, 
from 4:00 to 5:00 o'clock, Mrs. 
William Lovitt from 5:00 until 
6:00 o'clock, and Mrs. James Mc- 
Murtry from 7:00 until 9:00 
o'clock. 

Much was added to the attrac- 
tiveness of the rooms by the many 
beautiful gifts which were present- 
ed to the chapter 

The pledges in whose honor the 
dance was given are the Misses 
Martha Jane Blackmail, Lucy 
Blackmail, Virginia Botsford, Eliza- 
beth Dewing, Barbara Dutton. Lu- 
zella Eubank, Mary Gilmore, Doro- 
thy Jameson, Helen Kirk, Caroline 
Morrison, Margaret Simpson, Vir- 
ginia Stevenson, Priscilla Swan, 
Mary Tyson, Lois Ward. 



CHAPEL CALENDAR 
Tuesday, Nov. 14, 10:00 a. m.— 

Chapel Service. Speaker: Rev. 
Paul Roberts, D. D., Rector 
Grace - St. Stephens Episcopal 
Church. 

Wednesday, Nov. 15, 5:15 p. m. — 
Organ recital. Miss Leta Gale, 
assistant organist. Shove chap- 
el. 

Thursday, Nov. 16, 5:00 p. m. — 
The fourth and last in the fourth 
group of the Five o'Clock 
Series of addresses by Dean 
James G. McMurtry, "Job, the 
Solution." The public is in- 
vited to all the programs. 

Cheque Books 

Dances were paid to the order 
of the Kappas and their guests by 
means of blue and blue cheque 
books, which were the programs at 
the dance given in honor of t h e 
pledges of Kappa Kappa Gamma. 
The party was held at the home of 
Emma Louise Jordan on Friday 
night, Nov. 3. Talisman roses ar- 
ranged in blue bowls added to the 
charm and color of the evening. 
Music was paid to the order of the 
guests by Johnny Metzler's orches- 
tra. 



Carrie Coed's Letters 

Dear old sis — 

Things have been happening 
thick and fast here. Item number 
one: — I went up to the Boulder 
game last Saturday. It was freez- 
ing cold, of course, but I managed 
to borrow a fur coat and went on 
my way. We had a grand time, al- 
though the boy friend took it upon 
himself to celebrate our defeat in 
a large way. 

Sunday night I went through the 
new Kappa house. It is very 
smooth. Lucky girls! 

Homecoming is coming upon us. 
The good old sorority told ME to 
get up a float. Now I ask you? I 
haven't an idea of what it's all 
about, but maybe a brain wave will 
come between now and Saturday. 
There will be a big parade, and 
suppers at the houses, and dances 
both nights, etc. I hope everyone 
has fun. It seems traditional to 
have the time of your life at home- 
coming. 

Incidentally, mid-semester grades 
are in. I have been having tests 
until I'm groggy. I am very sure 
that I flunked my psychology, but 
it doesn't worry me nearly as much 
as the more vital problem of not 
having a date for the dances this 
week-end. Have to go to Bible to- 
day and do some promoting. 
Hopefully yours, 

Carrie. 

P. S. — Sound out the family on 
fur coats will you? 



16 



THE TIGER 



Friday, November 10, 1933 



A mounting— The Opening gf 

/± The BROADMOOR NITE CLUB 



JOHNNY METZLER'S BAND 



DANCES EVERY SATURDAY NITE 



STARTING NOV. 18 



There 's always something New at 
NORFORDS- Now it's Sportswear 



Velvet Turban 
and Scarf Sets 



Wool 
Skirts 



Twin Sweater 
Sets 



CV3 



$1.29 $2.50 $1.98 

NORFORD 



CVD 



&s 



I iff fc 

<jk jaw ;!= 



For Homecoming 

Formal 
emi- 
Formal 
Frocks 

to wear 

Dining — 

Dancing . . 
Sunday Night _ 

$12.50 " 
$29.50 

Sizes 14 to 42 

Shimmering satins and taffetas, flattering velvets and crepes, 
alluring laces — in black, brown, mulberry, rose, red and blue. 
Trimmed with sparkling belt buckles, lovely lace insets, beads 
and metalaine cloth. Dresses that "shine" after dark! 

SECOND FLOOR 
Department Store 




PERSONALS 

Jean Johnson, '33, is doing R. 
F. C. work in Colorado Springs. 

Jane Sutton, '33, has a fellow- 
ship in social work at Western Re- 
serve at Cleveland. 

Sonia Benderoff, '30 is doing so- 
cial work in Cleveland. 

Dr. William Merrill Vories, '04, 
is an architect and head of the Omi 
Mission in Japan. 

Glenn Weber and Edwin Foss are 
working for the Pacific Telephone 
and Telegraph company in San 
Francisco. 

Ralph Starr Butler, '04, is an 
advertising agent. 

Edwin Frickey, '17, is teaching 
economics at Harvard. 

James McClintock, '07, is vice- 
chairman in charge of finance of 
the American Red Cross in Wash- 
ington, D. C. 

Janet McHendrie is with the 
courier system in Santa Fe. 

Troy Wade, '28, got married this 
summer, as did Lorna Dorlac, '30. 

Leon Starbuck, '32, married El- 
len Wood this summer and is with 
the Kennedy Brothers Construction 
company in New York. 

Alvin Foote, '29, is mining in 
Breckenridge. 

Dobson West, ex '34, is with the 
Vail Construction company in Pu- 
eblo. 

Donald McKay, '26, is assistant 
state superintendent of schools in 
New Mexico and lives in Santa Fe. 

Frank Seeley, '21, is supervisor 
of accounts at the head office of 
the Metropolitan Life in San Fran- 
cisco. 

Dr. Clarence Young, '21, consul 
general from China, was a delegate 
to the World Economic conference 
at London this summer. 

Clay Pomeroy, '33, is studying 
Latin at the University of Oregon. 

Barbara Potter, '28. is doing so- 
cial work in New York. 

William Hinkley, '32, is teaching 
in Las Animas and also doing po- 
litical work in Denver. 

Bob Moses, '28, is now married 
and is working in the statistical de- 
partment of the telephone company 
in Los Angele:. 

Douglas McHendrie, '27, is prac- 
ticing law in Trinidad. 

Edward Stanley, ex 24, is chief 
of the A. P. bureau in Denver, and 
has long been connected with the 
Associated Press, both in this coun- 
try and in England. 

Mac Perkins is doing architec- J 
tural work for the California schools 
which takes him temporarily to 
Southern California. 



Arnold Rowbonham, in French, 
and Madre Merrill, in Spanish, are 
the leading lights on the University 
of California faculty. 

Harold Milner is engaged in re- 

| search work in pure science, for the 

Carnegie institution; located on the 

campus of Stanford university, at 

1 Palo Alto. 

Mildred Moore, '29, is secretary 
in the Office of Admission, Confer- 
\ ence and Record at Mills college, 
where she has been since she gradu- 
ated from C. C. 

H. E. Ewing '08, has moved from 
Montevideo, Uraguay to Paseo Col- 
on 161, Buenos Aires, Argentine 
Republic. His new assignment is 
Regional Secretary for the Argen- 
tine Area, South American Federa- 
tion of Y. M. C. A.s. 

Capt. F. C. Hyde '18, has been 
appointed assistant professor of mil- 
itary science and tactics at M. I. T. 
Recently he has been engaged in 
important army construction work 
on the Mississippi river, near Rock 
Island, 111. 

Emmett Martin '26 now a mem- 
ber of the research staff of the Car- 
negie institution, spent the summer 
doing experiments in the Alpine lab- 
oratory in Manitou. His home in in 
Santa Barbara, Calif. 

Mr. Robert H. Berrehill '14, 704 
W. 24J/2 st., Austin Tex., gave an 
interesting piano recital at Recital 
hall, Baylor university, Waco, Tex., 
May 12. 

Edith Miller, '24, was graduated 
with high honors from the Univer- 
sity of Colorado Medical school in 
June. She will do her interne work 
at the Colorado general hospital, 
Denver. 

Miriam F. Carpenter, '05, dean 
of W.heaton college, was awarded 
the degree of Litt. D. by Smith 
College at their commencement this 
year. 

Dr. Dan forth Hale, '24, has ac- 
cepted a position in Iowa Wesleyan 
college to conduct the department 
of physics. 

Dr. and Mrs. J. E. Chamberlin 
(Margaret Kennedy, '28) are now 
living in Eads, Colorado. Dr. Cham- 
berlain is a chiropractor and has 
been practicing in Eads for about a 
year. 

Lillian Bateman, '13, was honor- 
ed by the graduating class of the 
Colorado Springs High School this 
year by having the yearbook, "The 
Terror Trail" dedicated to her. 

Eileen Edmondson, '30, has a 
teaching position in Des Moins, N. 
M. 



Friday, November 10, 1933 



THE TIGER 



6RBEM 



DRESSES OF DISTINCTION 
THREE STORES 



821 15th 



427 16th St. 
Main 7879 

70 Broadway PE 9045 
DENVER, COLO. 

Also 800 8th Ave., Greeley, Colorado 






for FIdO WERS 

IN DENVER 
See C. W. (Ted) DILLINGHAM 

FtOWBRS, Inc. 

LEADING FLORISTS & DECORATORS 
731 17th St. (Albany Hotel) Tabor 0010 

DENVER 



i 



Wagner - Fults Studio 



Official Photographer 

for 

Colorado College 



"Portraits that Please 



n 



Bums Theatre Building 



Elevator Service 






Seal 

Skin 

Oxfords 

Popular For 
College Men 

They look well, wear 
well and do not scuff — 
shown in black and in Brown 



$6 



.00 

We sell Inter-Woven Socks 




For your Convenience 



WELCOME HOME 
ALUMNI 

PAUDRE PAUFFE 

BEAUTY SHOPPE 
Phone 717-J 222 N. Tejon 



Born Thirty Years Too Soon 

Thirty years ago the president 

of the Iowa State Normal school 

said, "A boy who habitually 

smokes cigarettes can't be a gentle- 

»» 
man. 



Definition: "Filthy Lucre": Any 
sum of money possessed by the 
other fellow in excess of your pile. 
— Utah Chronicle. 

Six hundred and fifty Hunter 
College students expect to marry 
when they have graduated from 
college, the rest intend to work. 
Whet's the difference, we ask you! 



^ gOtS a>° HOSIEitT-? > 

£■ 22 S TCJON ST 



Aberdonians 

University of Missouri officials 
barred one instructor and 90 stu- 
dents from classes until they pay 
for past meals at the university hos- 
pital. 

••. ••• ••. 

Men rre like eggs. If you keep 
them in hot water too long they 
are liable lo «et hard boiled. 



The old phrase "Goin' my way," 

will probably be changed to "I say 

there old chap do you seem to be 

meandering in the direction I am 

headed," if we are to read the new 

book a young journalist at Yale is 

editing for students who walk to 

New York every week end. 
.». .». •*■ 

A Family Affair 

If the College of Emporia were 
out trying to claim records, she 
might be able to prove that she is 
the only college in the United States 
with as small an enrollment ?s 350 
to have seven first cousins attend- 
ing school all at once. All of the 
cousins are prominent on the cam- 

ous. — Doane Owl. 

••■ ■•• ••• 

"Flung, dammit, flunk" has been 
organized as a fraternity at Alaba- 
ma U. Its purpose is to foster a 
feeling of brotherly love and sym- 
pathy among the lesser lights of the 
institution, whose grades prevent 
them from joining other fraternities 

~n the campus. 

••• ••• ••• 

Of the 75 coaches at famous 
colleges 10 years pgo only 23 are 
still connected with football. Wis- 
consin has had 12 coaches in 44 

yerrs. — New Mexico Lobo. 
••• ••■ ••• 

Speaking of southern customs, 
such terms as woo, court, date, etc, 
are passe below the Mason- 
Dixon line they say Burbanking 
it took us a while to catch 

on, too. — Utah Chronicle. 
.»• .*. ■•• 

The University of Ut?h has re- 
ceived $600,000 from the federal 
oublic works rdministration, ac- 
cording to the Utah Chronicle. A 
new library building is to be con- 
structed at a cost of $550,000, and 
remodeling and campus improve- 
ments will get $25,000 each. The 
monev for improving the campus 
will be used almost entirely for 
salaries of student workmen. 



Just Good, Clean Fun 

At Boulder on Tuesday night of 
last week, someone parked a little 
garbage on the Phi Psi and Chi 
Psi's lawns. The fireworks started 
with these two standing off the Phi 
Kaps, Sigma Nu, Sigma Chi, Phi 
Delts, and Sig Alphs; and ended 
with the arrival of the sheriff with 
tear gas bombs. Three windows of 
the Chi Psi lodge were broken and 
the front door torn loose. 



The football team of the Uni- 
versity of Nebraska will appear on 
the gridiron this year wearing satin 
pants, but it will still be another 
season or two, we hope, before 
they resort to the lace trimmings. 



Back in the 70's at Penn State 
college, the permission of the presi- 
dent as well as the approval of the 
dean of women was necessary to 
secure a date with a coed. I won- 
der if they were worth it. 

— Doane Owl. 



For The Game — 
For Sports and 
For Dress Up. 




POLO 
COATS 

New Double Breasted — 
Smart — Grays and Tans 
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Belts. 

$]950 



WAYMIRE 

CLOTHING CO 



THE TIGER 



Friday, November 10, 1933 



Welcome Alumni ! 

WE'RE GLAD TO SEE YOU BACK 

Our Store is the Place to Ge Together with Your Friends. 

The Murray Drug Co. 

Across from the Campus 
832 N. TEJON 21 S. TEJON 



GET YOUR SHOES 

REPAIRED AND SHINED 

TODAY 

We are Closed Armistice Day 

College Shoe Shop 



PHOTOGRAPHS 

The Gift that only you can give 
Official Photographer, C. C. Nugget 

PAYTON STUDIO 

30 S. Tejon Phone M. 477-J 



Furmbilt &*.!»* 

"Here Is Hoping You Win the Game, — But win or lose — 
If you give everything you are capable of, you are not to 
blaim — It's good Sportsmanship we most desire, regard- 
less. 

SUITS, TOPCOATSandOVERCOATS 

For Less 

And Return For More. 

You escape paying for the usual COVER 
CHARGE, Atmosphere or any other waste. 

THOUSANDS are wearing 
the FURMBILT Garments — 

CHAMPIONS In Their Class. 

You Meet The Furmbilt 
in Every Walk of Life, as The 



We Save You Money at no 
Expense of Dignity 



Beautiful Line of 
Lounging Robes 
Flannel and Silk 
20 N, Tejon St. 



► FURMBILT STORE 

P. L. Thorsen, Owner 



Denver's Most Distinctive Dining Place 



LOW PRICES 




UN EXCELLED QUALITY 

When you celebrate in Denver with the 
Gang or with that cozy dinner for Two — 
choose the 

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1718-1730 Broadway 



Keystone 8208 



Joint Resolutions of the Trustees and Faculty of COLORADO 
COLLEGE upon the Death of Dr. Henry Suzzallo 

The Board of Trustees and the Faculty of COLORADO COLLEGE 
wish to record their feeling of irreparable loss in the death of Dr. Henry 
Suzzallo. His distinguished position as an administrator and construc- 
tive leader in American education, and his influence upon its ieadls and 
policies, have been recognized by all who know the recent history of 
our schools and colleges. We desire especially to testify to his qualities 
as a friend not only of all this is best in the conduct of education, but 
of the finest ideals of American democracy. To him all educational val- 
ues were social and human. 

Called in 1930 to serve as adviser to the college in determining its 
policy, he made a contribution to its life that far transcends even the 
important changes in curriculum and organization which were adopted 
with his recommendations. His brilliast and facile intellect, his grasp of 
educational problems, and above all his intense and selfless devotion to 
humanity, made themselves felt wherever he established contact among 
us. Short and infrequent as were his visits to our campus, his character 
and his ideals have become a priceless part of the intangible fabric 
which is the real COLORADO COLLEGE. 
Committee : 

For the Board of Trustees, C. B. Hershey, 
For the Faculty, Albert H. Daehler. 



Pep Bonfires, Mammoth Parade, 
Banquets-Homecoming 

With the tingle of fall weather 
goading the student body on to 
greater efforts COLORADO COL- 
LEGE is in the throes of producing 
the greatest Homecoming ever, un- 
der the supervision of Harry E. 
Fontius, Jr., Homecoming chair- 
man. 

With a pep bonfire at night start- 
ing activities, enthusiasm will be at 
such fevered pitch by game time 
Saturday that old man Brigham 
Young and his twenty odd wives 
will be swept right off the field. 

All fraternity and sorority house 
decorations must be completed by 
6 o'clock tonight, as judging will 
be started soon thereafter. This 
year a cup will be awarded each to 
the best decorated fraternity and 
sorority houses. 

Saturday morning all fraternity 
and sorority floats are to be assem- 
bled on Tejon street, at Platte 
avenue and are to be ready to 
march at 10:30. The parade is to 
be held in conjunction with the 
American Legion Armistice day pa- 
rade. At 10:59 a bomb will be set 
off which will be the signal for the 
parade to halt and a complete si- 
lence for one minute, after which 
taps will be blown. 

Starting after the game will be 
banquets, teas, open house, house 
warmings, and buffet suppers at 
the various fraternity and sorority 
houses. 

There will be two Homecoming 
dances held this year: the 'C club 
dance at Hiawatha gardens Friday 
night at which the Homecoming 
queen? will be crowned; the other, 
the Bengal club Homecoming dance 
Saturday night at the Broadmoor 
Nite club. 



This year's parade is under the 
supervision of Don Smith, who will 
be in charge of placing the various 
floats in their proper positions. The 
drawings for positions in the pa- 
rade are: 



2. 

3. 

4. 

5. 

6. 

7. 

8. 

9. 
10. 
11. 
12. 
13. 
14. 
15. 
16. 



Band. 

Tigers club. 
Growlers club. 
Homecoming Queen. 
Delta Alpha Phi. 
Gamma Phi Beta. 
Beta Theta Phi. 
Kappa Kappa Gamma. 
Phi Delta Theta. 
Delta Gamma. 
Kappa Sigma. 
W. A. A. 

Phi Gamma Delta. 
Kappa Alpha Theta. 
Sigma Chi. 
All other floats. 



W. A. A. To Initiate 

The first W. A. A. initiation of 
the year Friday evening, Nov. 1 7, 
at Bruin Inn. Committees appoint- 
or arrangements are; {Catherine 
Ragle and Mary Fisher, transpor- 
tation; Francesca Hall, Harriette 
Kearney, Virginia. Berger, and 
Charline Johnson, program; Pau- 
line Johnson, Evelyn Richter, Win- 
ifred Vessey, Harriette Heinke, and 
Clara Haeker, decorations and in- 
vitations. 

Those who will be initiated are 
Roberta Tapley, Martha Statton, 
Pauline Kurachi, Jeanne Crawford, 
Ruth Crawford, Dorothy Elston, 
Charlene Clark, Eileen Hale, Mary 
Alice Bensos, Joanna Jolly, and 
Anne Espe. These new members 
were elected two weeks ago. 

At the same time hiking awards 
w:il be presented to Eleanor Hast- 
ings, Dorothea Carleton. and Nor- 
ma Garrett, who recently climbed 
Pikes Peak. 



Friday, November 10, 1933 



THE TIGER 



17 



You and Your Boy — A Partnership 

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2. Learn the value of consistent saving. 

3. Have insurance when he needs it and at his present low rate. 

4. Create an estate thru the best and safest investment in the world. 

5. Establish a guaranteed retirement income for himself. 



THE PENN MUTUAL LIFE 
INSURANCE COMPANY 

Established 1847 
Independence Square, Philadelphia 



RENE P. BANKS, GENERAL AGENT 

1016 Patterson Building 
Denver, Colorado 



OFFICIAL 
COLORADO COLLEGE 

METZLER'S ORCHESTRA 



HOME-COMING DANCE 



HIAWATHA GARDENS 



40c 
Per Person 

TONITE, NOV. 10th 



In Denver it's 

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"THE SMART HOTEL OF THECWEST" 

Whenever you come to Denver for a week end trip- or an 
overnight stay, don't forget that you can make your visit here a 
pleasant one by making the Park Lane your headquarters. You 
can always be assured of the finest of Accommodations includiing 
Room Meals and our Superb Service at Moderate Rates. 

THE PARK LANE HOTEL 

Denver's Finest Transient Hotel 

Transient Rates: $3.00, $4.00, $5.00 per Day. 

PAUL W. STEIN, Manager 






Compliments of 

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Cozy Booths 



AFTER THE DANCE 



i Hersheys Barbecue \ 

Across from the Aeroplane on the way to Manitou 
DELICIOUS SANDWICHES AND CHILI 

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i»strRi»c nm tobacco 



FOR 



'"g year the "Cream ofl, r* rep '° duce follow! 
S «'ke, for tobacco musTJ ?° P for your Luckv 



3 




4&iz 



*>., 



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<r. 







CopyrUht. 1933, Th« 
Anerlcan Tobacco 

Company 



For Tiin/i.^ 



't* toasted " 




WHAT WILL HAPPEN 




> 



Vande Graaff 



Clark 



When Tiger meets Tiger" 

SATURDAY ?? 



Isiued each week during th« academic year. Entered at thp'ost Office at Colorado Springe aa Second-Claee Hatter. 



THE TIGER 



Friday, November 17, 1933 



A SERVICE FOR 
EVERY PURSE— 

Consistent users of Ivory Soap 
for twenty-two years. 



The PEARL 

Laundry 



Colorado College 

TEXT BOOKS 

AND SUPPLIES 

C. C. and Fraternity 

Stationery 

Laundry Bags — $2.00 Each 

Murray Drug Co. 

Across From the Campus 



Tiresfone 

ONE STOP 
SERVICE 



Let Us 
Prepare Your Car . 
for Winter Driving 



Complete Lubrication 

Motor Oils 

Batteries and Repairing 

Firestone Anti-freeze 

Prestone and Alcohol 



l 



Brake Relining and Adjusting 

Texaco "Fire Chief" Gasoline 

"Red Head" Car Heaters 

Bcwtetic Tte** 

115-121 N. Nevada 
Phone M. 202 



W. I.LUCAS 

— HAS— 

EVERYTHING IN SPORTINC 
GOODS— 

"Tigers Always Welcome" 

120 North Tejon Street 
Main 900 




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I 



There are 6 types 

of home-grown tobaccos that 

are best for cigarettes 

Bright tobaccos 

U. S. Types 11, 12, 13, 14— produced 
in Virginia, North and South Carolina, 
and parts of Georgia, Florida and Ala- 
bama. 

BURLEY TOBACCO 

U. S. Type 31 — produced in Kentucky. 
Maryland tobacco 

U. S.Type 32 — produced in Southern 
Maryland. 

These are the kinds of home- 
grown tobaccos used for making 
Chesterfield Cigarettes. 

Then Chesterfield adds aro- 
matic Turkish tobacco to give 
just the right seasoning or spice. 

Chesterfield ages these 
tobaccos for 30 months 
— 2% years — to make 
sure that they are milder 
and taste better. 



garettes 




Tobacco being sold at auction 
on a Southern market. 










cr 




estertieid 



the cigarette that's MILDER 

the cigarette that tastes better 



© 1931. T.ir.Gprr & Myers Tobacco Co 



PHOTOGRAPHS 

The Gift that only you can give 
Official Photographer, C. C. Nugget 

PAYTON STUDIO 

30 S. Tejon 



BISSEL'S pharmacy 

HENRY E. COPELAND, Prop. 

A Tiger Booster 



DL... M Am I I Tol. M. 980 Corner Dale and Weber 

rnone m. *i i-j | prompt DELIVERY 



IRA C. DUGAN 

Jeweler and Optometrist 

Fine Watch and Clock Repairing 

Eyes Examined — Glasses Fitted 

— Lenses Duplicated — 

Phone Main 1702-J 9 N. Tejon St. 



VOLUME XXXVI 



THE TIGER 



COLORADO COLLEGE WEEKLY NEWS-MAGAZINE 



Number 9 




♦ Rhodes 

Monocle And Topper 

An opportunity to study at Ox- 
ford university may be the lot of 
Carl Maynard or Charles Dewing 
as a result of their selection by the 
faculty of COLORADO COLLEGE 
as candidates from the college for 
the district examinations. 




CARL MAYNARD 

Senior Class 

Maynard is a member of the 
senior class. He is president of 
Beta Theta Pi fraternity, member 
of Red Lantern club, class treas- 
urer, member of the band and stu- 
dent of Kiwanis International. His 
major is chemical engineering. He 
cones from Pueblo. 

Dewing is a member of the jun- 
ior class and a Phi Delta Theta 
pledge. His major is sociology. His 
father is a member of the faculty. 

Douglas McHendrie, '27, and a 
Rhodes scholar is a member of the 
committee which will examine the 
candidates of this district. 



A. A. U. W. Speakers 

Future programs of the American 
Association of University Women 
have an international aspect. Prof. 
Charles Bayley, graduate of Man- 
chester university, will speak on 
"English Students and Their Gov- 
ernment." Professor Bayley has had 
two years' experience in German 
universities, and formerly taught in 
English universities and the Univer- 
sity of Toronto. 

Pietro Gerbore, Royal Italian 
Consul will speak on "Some Aspects 
of Facism." Representing Russia, 
Mrs. Frad Bushee from the Univer- 
sity of Colorado will tell of "Rus- 
sia's Experiment". James Grafton 
Rogers, head of the law school at 
the University of Colorado, will give 
views on "America's Position in 
World Affairs". Mr. Rogers was as- 
sistant to the Secretary of State un- 
der the Hoover administration. 

Alexander Campbell of the Foun- 
tain Vallev school, will speak on 
"Queen Victoria, Exponent of Inter- 
nationalism." There will also be a 
musical program in charge of Mrs. 
Tor Hvbloom, and a report on the 
n-^ ; onal meeting of A. A. U. W. by 
Miss Louise Kampf, president of the 
local organization, the membership 
of which numbers more than 150. 



Theta Subscription Dance and 
Bridge will be held Friday, Nov. 
17. at the Broadmoor Nite Club, 
Johnny Metzler's orchestra will 
play. Bridge begins at 8:00, and 
dancing at 9:00. 

Short Story Contest 

for college students to be spon- 
sored by the magazine, "Story", has 
been announced. A first prize of 
$100 and a second of $50 will be 
awarded for the best stories submit- 
ted. The contest will be open to all 
registered students of colleges and 
universities in the United States, but 
selection by qualified judges at the 
various institutions will limit the 
entries to two from each campus. 

Entries must be in the hands of 
the editors by April 15, 1934. The 
winning story will be published and 
others of unusual merit which still 
are not prize-winners will be con- 
sidered for possible publication. 



One Of The Most 

successful rallies ever held at 
Cossitt! That was the impression 
of the bon-fire held Friday night 
before Homecoming. 

Coach Van de Graaff gave a 
short talk telling the student body 
that a fighting student body has 
won more than one ball game when 
the odds were against the team. 
President Hershey then gave a 
short talk welcoming the alumni of 
COLORADO COLLEGE back to 
their alma mater. Don Glidden, 
president of the student body, and 
Harold Marlowe, sports editor of 
the TIGER both presented short 
talks voicing their opinions of the 
game with B. Y. U. 



Pioneer Student 

of Colorado College, Mrs. Ruth 
Vallette Ayers, passed away at her 
home in Littleton, Monday morning 
at one o'clock. 

Mrs. Ayers was a student at the 
old Cutler Academy from 1891 un- 
til 1894, and was a member of the 
old Minerva society. She had the 
distinction of having been the first 
girl living in Montgomery Hall to 
become engaged. 

Her son, J. Sherburne Ayers, now 
attending Colorado College, is a 
member of the class of '35. 



More Wedding Bells 

The marriage of Marion Gail- 
braith to Carl Clifton was solemn- 
ized on Wednesday noon, Nov. 15, 
at the home of Mrs. C. C. Bracey, 
1915 N. Nevada Ave., Colorado 
Springs. The bride, who was a Jun- 
ior here at C. C. last year and a 
pledge of Kappa Gamma, was at- 
tired in a stunning Hunter's green 
outfit with brown accesories. After 
a short wedding trip, the couple will 
return to Lawrence, Kansas, where 
Mr. Clifton is a retail druggest. 



Packing Their Bags 

and boarding outward bound 
trains, alumni bid an adieu to the 
college and Homecoming festivities 
until next year. 

Dances and various functions of 
the campus organizations provided 
plenty of activity, and the outcome 
of the game assumed minor propor- 
tions in comparison to the enthu- 
siasm called forth by the parade, 
pep bonfire, and all the rest of the 
trimmings that go to make a real 
homecoming. 

This year saw real ingenuity in 
the decorations of fraternity houses, 
and the sorority and fraternity 
floats in the parade were as clever 
as have been seen for many a 
home-coming. Patriotic ideas were 
included along with those of home- 
coming in both the parade and 
house decorations, and sand bag 
forts along with the more modern 
theme of the N. R. A. were to be 
found. The Phi Gams and Sigma 
Chis received first and second prizes 
respectively, in the house decora- 
tions, while the Beta and Kappa 
Alpha Theta floats were adjudged 
as worthy of receiving the first 
prize with the Delta Alphs and Kap- 
pa Kappa Gamma obtaining sec- 
ond place. 



Blue Moon Players 

is the striking title leading actors 
and actresses of Colorado Springs 
have chosen for their new associa- 
tion which will supplant the de- 
funct Drama club. In the first 
play, "Zeezee" by Anne Murray, 
which will be presented Nov. 21 
and 22, many COLORADO COL- 
LEGE plavers have leading parts. 

Mrs. Milton S. Rose, wife of 
Professor Rose of the faculty, has 
an important part. Nadine Kent, 
Elizabeth Dewing, Mary Strachan, 
Jane Wahtola, Jack Kintz, Wendell 
Carlson, and Ralph Smith are 
COLORADO COLLEGE students or 
alumni having roles. 

Tickets may be secured from 
Jack Kintz. 



♦ Aggies Campus 

Cow Comedy 

The A. S. C. C. austere govern- 
ing body of COLORADO COL- 
LEGE, preplexedly rubbed its offi- 
cial chin Tuesday night over the 
hitherto unknown question of dis- 
cussion, a bill for damages in- 
curred by a cow. The bovine in 
question, belonging to one Mrs. 
Caroline Chioro, was given French 
leave Thursday night before home- 
coming, by a group of over-dem- 
onstrative college wits whose de- 
sire for celebration overbalanced 
their regard for the peace-loving 
and law-abiding citizens in the 
community. 

According to Mrs. Chioro, ex- 
citement within bounds is appropri- 
ate. And, having raised dumb ani- 
mals all of her life, she possesses 
more than passing judgment on the 
typical college boy. She also ad- 
mitted that breaking down fences 
and stealing live stock was fairly 
funny, but that the cow in question 
was expecting additions to the cow 
family, and that as such was in no 
condition to the enforced introduc- 
tion to COLORADO COLLEGE. 

The itemized bill, which inciden- 
tally was not assumed by the A. S. 
C. C. is as follows: 

Cleaning cow - - - $5 00 
Veterinary - - - 2.50 

Hauling cow home - - 3.00 



Total $10.50 



Mystery 

shrouds the background of re- 
ligious histnrv. Dr. Paul Roberts of 
the Gr^ce Eniscopal church empha- 
sized this point in his address Tues- 
day in Shove chapel. 

Sneakine on tV>e topic. "The 
fuinr^mentals of Religious Life," 
Dr. Roberts told how the mysteries 
of words were fathomed by poets, 
the mvsteries of colors bv artists, 
and the mvsteries of religion by 
men who search for the intangibles 
which mean an enjoyment of life. 

"You cannot nrove God. Destroy 
Him if you could! To prove the in- 
finite soul would make the meaning 
small. The real things in life elude 
that nroof". Dr. Roberts said, and 
added his advice to those who are 
looking for their real religion. "The 
background is mvstery. The funda- 
mentals are God and the human 
soul. If you h.we those two things 
you cannot helf. but have religion". 



THE TIGER 



Friday, November 17, 1933 



THE TIGER 




Editor LEW CROSBY 

Business Manager E. F. STAPLETON 

EDITORIAL STAFF 

Editors: Manairinj; Editor. Bob Johnson; Campus. Joseph Lowe; Sports, 
Harold Marlowe, John Bicknell ; Society, Alice Hersom ; A. W. S., Ernestine 
Stroup ; Make-Up. Martin Lesrere ; Exchange, John Dickey ; News Editors. 
Miller Stroup, Fritz Baker, Peg Swan; Pictorial, David Dentan. Society 
Staff — Luzilla Eubank, Mildred Fritchle, Muriel McClanahan, Sarah Mcln- 
tyre, Caroline Morrison, Lyda Roark, Sally Tompkins. Jane Walker, Imo- 
irene Young. Campus Editor— Joseph Lowe. News Editors — Edith Weaver, 
Miller Stroup, Albert Stubblefield. News Staff — Jake Johnson, David Den- 
tan, Gilbert Baylis, Alice Sutton, LaRue Wiley. Nanet Meredith, Claire 
Sweany, Elvira Cortellini, Ruth Mary Webster, Esther Alexander, Charles 
Dewing, Fred Baker. Ken Hall, Jennie Conway, Mark Schreiber, Marybel 
Poer, Louie Marie Mason, Ruth Liverman, Margaret Stewart, Ann Daniels, 
Conrad Brown. Ernestine Stroup, Peg Swan, Dale Ashbaugh, Frank John- 
son, Jean James, Dorothy Elston, Helen Miller, Ellen Perry, Susan Braer- 
ton. Dick Hall, Emma Louise Jordan. Proof Readers: Lucy Blackman, 
Frances Stevenson. Sports Staff — Ronald Rolph. James Ranson, Dick Alston, 
David Waters. 



+ A Bow 

by the members of your TIGER staff is made in the staff box im- 
mediately above. And may this office add that those listed therein are, 
truthfully speaking, to be given much credit for putting out the TIGER. 
Theirs is the credit due, for their only remuneration for hours of work 
on this publication each week is interest in the work. They are im- 
portant cogs of a machine without which your paper could not exist. 
Their due — a big hand — for splendid cooperation and wholehearted 
effort. 



^ Cow Comedy 

and its delineation, found elsewhere in this issue, is of a much 
deeper significance to you and me than the surface representation might 
indicate. It is only too true that the A. S. C. C. as an organization can- 
not conscientiously spend money entrusted to them by the entire stu- 
dent body of COLORADO COLLEGE in paying for the pranks of a few. 
And, it is too true that public censure is never severe where "college 
boy" indiscretions are concerned. However, the owner of the misappro- 
priated animal in question, is no more the one to bear the expense of 
the prank than are students who were not included. It is up to those 
who were responsible for the damage to make good. As it was first 
consummated in the spirit of good fun, let's see that the situation is 
righted in the same manner. Spirit is an asset only if it carries through. 
Which is iust another way of paraphrasing "Little Caesar's" flicker- 
famous philosophy, "If you can't take it, don't dish it out." 

Impressionistic Scenery j What Benefits 

designed by Robert Slate of the i should a man derive from serv- 
Broadmoor Art academy will serve ing God faithfully? Should his re- 



ps a setting for "Children of the 
Moon", the Koshare play now in 
rehearsal. Mr. Slate's unique and 
strikingly artistic sets used in R. U. 
R." aroused much favorable com- 
ment and they are expected to add 
greatly to this year's production. 

"Children of the Moon" is to be 
produced sometime before Thanks- 
giving, altho no definite date has 
been announced as yet. There are 
two casts in rehearsal for the play, 
from which a 
be made soon. 



wards be, as many people believe 
they are, material wealth, exemp- 
tion from suffering, or a great 
number of friends? Some of these 
questions, so pertinent todav. were 
developed bv Dean James G. Mc- 
Murtry in his public lecture on 
"Job, the Problem" at Shove 
chanel Thursday, Nov. 9. 

The auestions he answered at 
vesterday's lecture, statins* that Job 
had to realize that all the benefits 



Dance Interest 

heightens for COLORADO COL- 
LEGE students with the opening 
Saturday nite, Nov. 18, of an all- 
winter Saturday night series of fes- 
tivities with the music of Johnny 
Metzler and h i s orchestra. The 
Broadmoor Nite Club, scene of 
many festive occasions in times 
past, will henceforth be the week- 
end rendezvous for those who like 
to dance to the strains of a high- 
class dance band. 

Metzler's musical aggregation , 
is, with the exception of one man, 
composed entirely of present and 
past students of COLORADO COL- 
LEGE. The band held the summer 
contract at t h e Hotel Broadmoor 
ballroom for the summer just past 
and justly deserves the designation, 
"big-time." An added feature of 
the dances will be the use of a loud 
speaker system which insures an 
even distribution of music to all 
parts of the dance floor. Admission 
Saturday will be $1.50 including 
tax. 

In subsequent issues of the 
TIGER will appear a short charac- 
terization of each of the men in ! 
the orchestra who are or have been i 
attending COLORADO COLLEGE. 

Class To Church 

The medieval and modern his- 
tory class of COIORADO COL- 
LEGE accompanied by Dr. C. B. 
Malone, on its yearly excursion to 
St. Mary's church Wednesday night 
to learn something about catholic- 
ism. 

In following a general outline, 
Father Keley showed the students 
the vestments, religious articles 
used in services, architecture and 
other objects of importance, ex- j 
plaining their significance. He also 
interpreted some of the doctrines 
for them. 

The visit was to give the stu- 
dents a background of the church 
which included all of western 
Europe before the Reformation and 
remains one of the greatest reli- : 
gious powers on the continent to- 
day. 



St. James Infirmary 

Blues was one of the highlights 
on the program sung by Hall John- 
son's negro choir last night at the 
City Auditorium. 

A mixed chorus of eighteen voic- 
es singing a capella, the colored 
choristers were sensationally thrill- 
ing in their racial rhythms. Spirit- 
uals (including the well-known 
"Swing Low, Sweet Chariot"), bal- 
lads, ancestral songs of locality, 
and perhaps most moving of all 
the songs of labor, completed the 
program. 

Mr. Johnson, noted for his ar- 
rangement of the musical score ol 
"Green Pastures", fascinated the 
audience with his conducting — his 
thin, nervous hands perfectly 
wielding the negro singing. 



final selection will ' of serving God were not necessarily 
wealth and hapniness here on earth)* 
but the spiritual enjovment and sat- 
isfaction experienced. 



An Aptitude test will be given by 
the Association of American Medi- 
cal colleges Dec. 6, for all students 
expecting to enter Medical school 
in 1934. This test will be given to 
all such students in the United 
States. 

A list of all men who expect to 



Another series of lectures will be 
given next semester, but the sub- 
ject has not been announced as 
yet. 

Mr. and Mrs. Mike V. McEnany 
were visitors in Colorado Springs 
enter medical schools is given to all last week. Mr. McEnanv took his 
first class medical colleges. A person A. R. depree at COLORADO COI - 
is admitted according to his rating I EGE in 1929, received his master's 
on the test. No COLORADO COL- degree at Darlmouth, and is now 
LEGE student has yet been rejected, superintendent of Alamosa schools. 



In Proof 

of his statement that "We not 
only give political situations in our 
history courses but also the cultural 
development of the country, which 
often times is of more value to the 
student." Dr. C. B. Malone used 
bona fide Chinese paint brushes for 
his History of the Far East class. Al- 
though the results of the work, he 
admits, were negligible, the insight 
into the oriental art and culture 
gained by the students was of much 
value. 

Dr. Malone further delineated 
unon his subject with the display of 
his collection of Chinese paintings, 
explaining at the same time the 
points in which this school of art 
differs from other recognized trends 
in painting. 



Nike of Samothrace 

The "Winged Victory" of Samo- 
thrace which stands at the end of 
Coburn library, was given in mem- 
ory of Rev. Daniel P. Noyes and 
Helen McGregor Noyes, his wife, 
by their three children, Miss M, 
McGregor Noyes, and Atherton 
Noyes, both members of the college 
faculty at that time, and Edward 
P. Noyes of Boston. The replica was 
given March 21, 1895. 

This product of Greek art was 
discovered during excavations made 
by the French consul, Champoiseay, 
in the island of Samothrace in the 
year 1863, and was removed bj 
him to Paris where it now stands in 
the Louvre. The statue stood origi- 
nally in the open air at the head ol 
a valley, overlooking the shrines ol 
the so-called Greek Gods of Samo- 
thrace who protected mariners and 
to whom the statue was a thanks of- 
fering. It was placed on the slope 
of a wooded hill so that from below 
it stood out boldly against the sky. 
Never being seen from the rear, thai 
side is left unfinished. 

The event, which the statue comi 
memorated, was doubtless the vi«^ 
torv won by Demetrius Poliorcetes 
of Macedon over Ptolemy Soter anc 
the Eavptian fleet, off Cyprus, in the 
year 306 B. C. As a result of this 
victory Demetrius and his fathei 
Antigonous assumed the royal title 
Coins of Demetrius bear a design 
evidently taken from the statue, anc 
these have suggested the restoration 
The statue dates therefore from 
about 300 B. C. The artist is un- 
known. 



NOTICE 
Miss Bessie East will be avail- 
able the week of Nov. 20. Mak< 
appointments thru Main 727. 



The Euterpe meeting which wai 
scheduled for Nov. 14, was post 
poned until Tuesday, Nov. 21. The 
meeting will be in the club room in 
Perkins hall at 7:30. 



1 



Friday, November 17, 1933 



THE TIGER 



Strachan's 

SWEET SHOP 

Bijou and Nevada 



A dish fit 
for a King ! 




BROTHERS 



wi 




SOUP 

NOW PLAYING 

AMERICA 
THEATRE 




SHEFF & SON 

SUPERIOR FORD SERVICE 
827 N. Tejon M. 1317 



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^ "MM" 

ACROSS FROM MURRAY'S 



LECTURE NOTES 

Students who are able to review complete 
notes are much better prepared for exam- 
inations. With ABC Shorthand, which is 
quickly learned in 12 easy lessons, you can 
take lecture and reading notes verbatim. 
Complete course now sells for $1.00 at 

Pikes Peak Stationery Co. 



DUKE UNIVERSITY 

SCHOOL OF MEDICINE 

DURHAM, N. C. 

Four terms of eleven weeks are given each 
year. These may be taken consecutively 
(M. D. in three years) or three terms may 
be taken each year (M. D. in four years). 
The entrance requirements are intelli- 
gence, character and at least two years of 
college work, including the subjects speci- 
fied for Grade A Medical Schools. Cata- 
logues and application forms may be ob- 
tained from the Dean. 



Carrie Co-ed's Letter 

Hi! Sis, 

What a weekend! What a 
homecoming! Of course, we didn't 
win the game, but the Tigers did 
their best, and most of the alums 
had a "high" time shouting advice 
from the side lines. 

After the game, everybody scat- 
tered to his or her fraternity house 
for the usual festivities. I hear the 
Gamma Phis had a formal tea com- 
bined with their first Founder's day 
ceremony. The Thetas and Kappas 
also entertained their alumnae with 
teas, which however were informal 
affairs. The Delta Gammas were 
different, and gave a dinner for 
their alumnae. 

Some of the fraternities went in 
for entertaining their alums in a big 
way. The Phi Delts, Kappa Sigs, 
and Delta Alphs each gave a ban- 
quet for the "ComingHomers" The 
fraternities which entertained at in- 
formal buffet suppers were the Bet- 
as and the Phi Gams. The Sigma 
Chis held an open house after the 
game for all their grads. 

Of course, the dance at Hiawatha 
on Friday night with the crowning 
of Betty Foster as Homecoming 
Queen was the exciting programe 
event, and the dance at the Nite 
Club on Saturday night was the 
finishing touch. It was all fun, but 
maybe it's just as well that Home- 
coming doesn't come more than 
once a year 

Anyhow, yours for bigger and j 
better and more exciting home- I Burns Theatre Bldg. 



For your Convenience 



ATypwriter 

— an Aid to Education 

The investment is small — 
payment as low as $4.00 a 
month may be made — -and we 
carry every make machine. 



The 

Typewriter 

Man 



125 N. Tejon St. 
Phone Main 95 




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On 

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The Biggest Nickel's 
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Same quality work — 
a real Hair cut for 

PETE'S BARBER SHOP 

8 E. Cucharras 



Quality "Master" Cleaners 

Only one Quality and the 
Price is uniform 

H. A. Thompson 
M in 1-8-1-1 10 E.Kiowa 



WAGNER-FULTS STUDIO 

Official Photographer for 

Colorado College 

"Portraits that Please" 

Elevator Service 



comings, 



.arrie 



Breakfast Dance 

Saturday morning the pledges of 
Gamma Phi Beta sorority will en- 
tertain the active members at a 
breakfast dance at Stratton Park 
Inn. The hostesses are: Phyllis 
Thompson, Doris Shock, Reba Ran- 
ey, Marguerite Ridge, Merry Hy- 
att, Muriel Hess, Berta Trotter, 
Betty Rc'd, Helen McCandlish, 
Doris Wylie, Winifred McBroom, 
Mary' Elizabeth Figge, Elizabeth 
Richter, Edith Southard. 



In respect to the memory of Mrs. 
Ruth V. Ayers whose death occur- 
red Monday morning, the Delta 
Alpha Phi tea dance has been post- 
poned until November, 24th. 



James MacMillan, district coun- 
selor of Alpha Kappa Psi, addressed 
members of the local chapter at 
their luncheon meeting at Stratton 
Park Inn Thursday. 

Henry Edward Schlegel, ex '35, is 
taking a pre-medic course at the 
University of Idaho. He is a mem- 
ber of Kappa Sigma fraternity. 
*•• ••• >•> 

Edith Hiskey, ex '35, is working 
for a B. S. degree at Southwestern 
college in Winfield, Kansas. 



Furmbilt?^ 

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Beautiful Line of 
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P. L. Thorsen, Owner 






THE TIGER 



Friday, November 17, 1933 



♦ 

The best way to tell of the j 
beauty of Colorado, Stand- { 
ley's Color Pictures, Hand- 
Colored — 35 cents up. 



H.L. Standley 

PHOTOGRAPHER 

224 No. Tejon St. 

Colorado Springs 



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Coburn Library 

COLORADO COLLEGE 

Colorado Springs, Colorado 
Fully accredited Co-educational 

Adequate equipment and high standards of scholastic attainment 
make Colorado College one of the outstanding Liberal Arts Col- 
leges of the country. 

A large faculty makes possible an individual friendly guidance 
for each student. 

Thorough and interesting courses in the Schools of ARTS and 
SCIENCES, LETTERS and FINE ARTS, the NATURAL SCI- 
ENCES, and the SOCIAL SCIENCES develop his mind in prep- 
aration for purposeful effective living in the modern world. 

Unsurpassed climate, beautiful environment and the influence of 
a cultured community combine to make study at COLORADO 
COLLEGE a privilege. 

C. B. HERSHEY, A. M., ED. D., Acting President. 



PORT 



Tiger Huddle 

"Chris" Marlowe 

The following an account of an 
incident characterizing school spirit 
as seen by this editor last Thursday 
night as a prelude to the Home- 
coming game with Brigham Young. 

The Colorado Springs police de- 
partment scored a 12-7 victory over 
the C. C. Vandalizers Thursday 



Outpassed 

by Ronald Rolph 

With ideal weather conditions 
prevailing for the annual Home- 
coming, the Brigham Young Uni- 
versity Cougars from Provo, Utah, 
scored a victory over the COLORA- 
DO COLLEGE Tigers by a score of 
25 -0. 

The game developed a different 



night, Nov. 9. The two sides lined j type of play from that which has 
up with the Vandalizers defending j been seen at most of the games in 
the Bemis quad, and the city police | which C. C. has participated this 



and fire departments offering the 
opposition. The Vandalizers kicked 
off, and to signify that the game 
was well under way, several bombs 
were exploded. The Vandalizers ad- 
vanced to the 20-yard line, when 
truck stopped the lads in their 
tracks. The firemen took possession 
of the (fire) ball on their own 20- 
yard line. 

At this juncture of the game the 
; girls of Bemis let out an enthusiastic 



season, in as much as both teams 
resorted to wide open running and 
passing attacks with comparatively 
little heavy line plunging, which 
made the game a particularly sen- 
sational one from the spectators 
standpoint. 

The first quarter saw the light- 
weight Tigers rising to their great- 
est heights when they solidly held 
the heavy Cougar team on their own 
six inch line, taking the ball on 
downs, and again in the second per- 



yell which pepped up the Vandaliz- . iod a tricky return kick by Griffith 
ers, and a stone-wall defense was after receiving the kickoff, placed 



the B. Y. U. eleven on the defen- 
sive, and long passes from Williams 
to LeMaster netted great gains, but 
the advantage was lost when a pas- 
sing attack was intercepted. 

The second period saw Brigham 
Young score the first touchdown on 



then put up, as the firemen advan- 
ced (up the hill) to their own 28- 
yard line. 

A fumble was fumbled at this 
point of the game, and the Vandal- 
izers went over for a touchdown. 
They converted the extra point as 

the (hose) ball was draped high a blocked punt which bounded over 
up around the eaves of Bemis. i the goal line and was recovered by 
Score, Vandalizers, 7 — City Offic- I Warner of B. Y. U. for their initial 
ials, 0. Time was called. Immediate- score of the game. 
Iy after this time out a police car With that exception B. Y. U. did 
arrived upon the scene, and the j not threaten seriously the balance 
Vandalizers retreated as the cops of the first half, and in spite of the 
went over for a touchdown. The j score against them the Tigers were 



half ended with a cloud of dust 
rising from the field of battle. Score. 
Vandalizers. 7 — City Officials, 6. 

Substitutions were made at the 
beginning of the second half, when 
two cops replaced three firemen. 



learly superior up to the half time, 
as has been the case so often dur- 
ing the present season. 

Coming back from the rest per- 
iod, the Cougars developed their 
over head game to its greatest de- 



Another yell was then let out by ■ or ree of success, scoring three touch 
the Bemis backers. And new goals downs either through long passes or 
were stressed in the Vandal huddle. I as a direct result of the gains netted 
After taking too much time in the i n that manner. An intercepted Ti- 
huddle. the collegians decided that ger pass in this period was instru- 
horse skin should be used instead of j mental in securing one touchdown 
the usual pig skin for the remainder ! by B. Y. U. 

of the game, and the cops scored : The fourth quarter was void of 
an overwhelming victory when the I sensation and developed into a 
Vandal quarterback (Finger) and > punting duel with no material ad- 
chief picture snatcher (Cruzan) vantage to either side, 
were picked up and carried across Wilson, the Cougar halfback, and 
the goal line by two enthusiastic Merklev who took his place both 
cops. Members of the second team loomed large in the Cougar victory, 
took up the general warfare, and For the Tigers Mihalick and Carl- 
the wee, wee hours of the morning son played powerful defensive 
found the remainder of the courag- j games, while Williams and LeMas- 
eous contingent (nursing injuries ter put on the best exhibition of 
and catching up on sleep) in the j passing for the Tigers, which has 
city hoosegow. [been seen this season. 



riday, November 17, 1933 



THE TIGER 



IIII1IIII II1IIIIIII III III III III I II 111 111 III III ||J 111 II [|| [|J 1 1 1 II 1 1 iiMiilDllii j 



Say Boys — 






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Barber 



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at 



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Couture's 

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DYEING CO. 

We Solicit Your Patronage 



218 N. Tejon St. 

Colorado Springs, Colo. 

Phone Main 1288 



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19 East Bijou Street 



Have your Nugget photo- 
graphs made now and avoid 



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Phone Main 577 



OCIAL 



THE SOCIAL CALENDAR 

Friday, Nov. 17 — 

Sigma Chi tea dance for Kappa 
Kappa Gamma 

Kappa Alpha Theta subscription 
dance 

W. A. A. initiation 
Saturday, Nov. 18 — 

Gamma Phi Beta breakfast dance 
C. C-Mines 

Presidents' dinner 

Phi Delta Theta dance 
Sunday, Nov. 19 — 

Foreign Relations club 
Tuesday, Nov. 21 — 

A. S. C. C. council 
Wednesday, Nov. 22 — 

Dinner — senior women 
Thursday, Nov. 23— 

Concert, auditorium 
Friday, Nov. 24 — 

Delta Gamma tea dance 

Phi Gamma Delta dance 

Beta Theta Pi dance 

Delta Alpha Phi tea dance 
Saturday, Nov. 25 — 

C. C. -Colorado Agricultural col- 
lege, Denver 
Sunday, Nov. 26 

Newman club 



The President 

of every campus organization 
will be the guest of Mrs. Louise W. 
Fauteaux, dean of women, at the 
presidents' dinner, Nov. 18, in Be- 
mis. This dinner, which is spon- 
sored by the Associated Women stu- 
dents, is the first of its kind to be 
given. Last year only the women's 
organizations were represented. 
Pres. C. B. Hershey will be the 
speaker of the evening. 

The guest list includes Ruth Ed- 
wards, A. W. S.; Martha Kelly, 
Panhellenic; Dorothy Skidmore, 
Delta Gamma; Marie Hoag, Kappa 
Alpha Theta; Julia Sherman, Gam- 
ma Phi Beta; Alice Hersom, Kap- 
pa Kappa Gamma; Emma Louise 
Jordan, Nugget; Lucile Swartz, 
Quadrangle; Ruth Adams, Tiger 
club and junior class; Francesca 
Hall, W. A. A.; Elizabeth Barrie, 
freshman counselor; Don Glidden, 
A. S. C. C.; Carl Maynard, Beta 
Theta Pi; Wallace Peck, Delta Al- 
pha Phi; Kenneth GToss, Kappa 
Sigma and senior class; Lots de- 
Holczer, Phi Delta Theta; Birt 
Slater, Phi Gamma Delta; Clarence 
Kehoe, Sigma Chi; Lew Crosby, 
TIGER; Park Eckles, Growlers; 
Mike Gleason, Newman club; Jack 
Conley, Red Lantern; Richard 
Hall, sophomore class; Eugene 
Gustavson, freshman class; Carl 
Carlson, 'C club; John Craig, Ko- 
share; Arthur Sharp, Jr., inter-fra- 
ternity council; Mrs. Sharp, Prof, 
and Mrs. H. E. Mathias, Dr. and 



Mrs. R. J. Gilmore, Dean and Mrs. 
W. D. Lovitt, Dean Louise W. 
Fauteaux, and Pres. and Mrs. C. 
B. Hershey. 



CHAPEL CALENDAR 
Tuesday, Nov. 21, 10:00 A. M.— 

Chapel Service. Speaker: Rev. 
Thomas H. Mathieson, D. D. 
Subject: "Where do we go from 
here?" 



Thirteen Lucky 

Kappa Kappa Gamma pledges 
were initiated in the new Kappa 
house Friday, Nov. 10. Those who 
received the golden key were: the 
Misses, Mary Alice Benson, Virginia 
Berger, Ann Daniels, Julia Dunham, 
Dorothy Echternach, Mildred Frit- 
chle, Edith Gaylord, Helen Haney, 
Katherine Lingham, Eleanor Lynch, 
Sarah Mclntyre, Lyda Roark, and 
Margaret Stewart. Dark Blue and 
light blue was the color scheme 
at the formal banquet at the house 
afterwards, carried out by meanse 
of blue candles, blue table cloths 
and dark blue goblets. Each of the 
initiates received a blue corsage of 
carnations and daisies. The guests 
were surprised to find on blue key- 
shape placecards, the pictures of 
each of the new initiates. The guests 
aside from the actives and initiates 
were: the Misses, Jean Lawson, 
Gretchen Wyland, and Marjorie 
Brown, from Beta Mu chapter, at 
Boulder, and the following alumnae 
from Delta Zeta chapter, Betty 
Blue, Evelyn Eastman, Margaret 
Bradfield, Betty Britain, and the 
Mesdames, Dorothy Pomeroy, Mar- 
guerite Wilgus and Mary Katherine 
VerDuft. 



Distinguished Service 

The Kappas entertained at a din- 
ner on Monday night, November 
13, in honor of the people whose 
interest and service made possible 
the remodeling of the Kappa lodge. 
The guests were Mr. and Mrs. Mir- 
ris Esmiol, Dean and Mrs. James 
McMurtry, Mr. and Mrs. J. R. 
Lowell, Mr. and Mrs. Charles Irwin, 
Mrs. A. A. Blackmail, Miss Olive 
Burke, Mr. and Mrs. Truman St. 
Claire, Mr. and Mrs. Olin P. Lee, 
Miss Dena Coyle, and Mr. Arthur 
Baylis. 

The outstanding events of the 
evening were the announcements by 
Miss Margaret Bradfield of the en- 
gagement of Miss Kay Lingham to 
Mr. Carl Chilcott, Beta Theta Pi, 
and by Miss Emma Louise Jordan 
of the engagement of Miss Marietta 
Sinton to Mr. John Gray, Phi Gam- 
ma Delta. 



A Tea 

was given in honor of Mrs. Lulu 
F. Bryan, director of provinces for 
Gamma Phi Beta, at the Gamma 



Phi house on Wednesday, Nov. 15. 
The patronesses of the chapter were 
invited to meet Mrs. Bryan, who is 
here to inspect the local chapter. 



S 



POT — 
SPIGOT 

No Cover Charge 



m 



MAIDEN FORM 



y 



<as* p 



With brassieres de- 
signed to give various 
types of figure the up- 
lift lines fashion notv 
demands. Select the 
. right one for you and 
see what a tremendous 
difference it makes! 



Waisdines are taken care 
of by Maiden Form's clever 
"High-Waist" girdles. that 
slenderize you at just the 
point that fashion says 
must be trim and slim. If 
your diaphragm needs 
smoothing (above the 
waisdine) select one of 
Maiden Form's "Dou- 
ble Support" brassieres. 



There are Maiden Form girdles to 
solve all "hip difficulties" — to give 
you the gende, moulded curves you 
want in place of the bulges and 
bumps that most figures come by 
naturally. 



Shown on the figure are Maiden 
Form's new V-Iine brassiere — "Dec- 
La-Tay" — designed to give width as 
well as uplift to the bust; and "High- 
Waist" girdle No. 1748, an exquisite 
"stream -line" 16-inch semi-step-in 
of elastic and satin brocade, lace 
trimmed. These are only two out of a 
great variety of Maiden Form crea- 
tions. Ask your dealer to show them 
to you or write for free booklet. 
Dept, C3 — Maiden Form Brassiere 
Co., Inc^ 245 Fifth Ave., New York. 

AT ALL LEADING STORES 



LOOK F6R THE NAME 




I REG. U. S. PAT. OFF. 




K B 


K A S 


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WITHOUT THIS LABEL 


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Maiden Form Garments Sold 
in Colorado Springs at 

Kaufmans 

DEPARTMENT STORE 



THE TIGER 



Friday, November 17, 193 



R 



emember — The Opening gf 

The BROADMOOR NITE CLUB 



JOHNNY METZLER'S BAND 



DANCES EVERY SATURDAY NITE 



STARTING TOMORROW NITE 



Keyhole Keeper 

Dead horses, live cows, dragging 
fire hoses, furious firemen and 
policemen, energetic freshmen just 
trying their darndest to make it a 
nice peppy evening and assisted by 
still spry upperclassmen, many of 
whom landed in the local hoosegow 
the same night, all contributed a 
little pre-homecoming "arousement" 
to what otherwise might have been 
rather a dull time. 

Though obviously morally ques- 
tionable, such midnight exuberance 
does cause a pleasing ripple in a too 

calm campus. 

••• ••• ••• 

And it makes Flitting Henry 
Finger's fifth trip to the Colorado 
Springs cooler. 

••• »•« »•• 

Moral : See where a life of crime 

leads one. 

■•■ ■•• >•• 

Short shavings: Lyda Roark and 
Mary Alice Benson were the willowy 
black underweared figures on the 
Kappa float .... the gals of de 
lawdge are proud of their new Kap- 
pa house but we think the little blue 
room on the second stoop is the 
class of de joint .... Kappa Sigma 
showed remarkable and unknown 
musical progress Tuesday evening 
when they banged away at the 
basketball game with one of the 
strangest, loudest, and weirdest con- 
coctions of band instruments ever 
heard in these parts. . . . inciden- 
tally their band was a lot better 
than their basketball team . . . . 
and then there is the former Phi 
Delt pledge down for homecoming 
who put Pauline Hoopes in a jitter 
over the weekend .... Joe Lowe 
carries a comb and nail file around 
with him in a nice neat leather case 
.... some other C. C. boys could 
follow suit ... a big red razzberry 
to the Gamma Phi Homecoming 
float 



Old Missions 

"The Old Missions of the Pu- 
eblos of New Mexico" is the sub- 
ject of a speech given by W. W. 
Postlethwaite, COLORADO COL- 
LEGE treasurer at the meeting of 
the Colorado Springs branch of the 
Archaelogical Institute of America 
Friday night in the Pit at Palmer. 

Mr. Postlethwaite's familiar 
knowledge of the pueblo country 
makes him an authority on the 
achievements of these pioneers in 
Christianity. His speech is illus- 
trated with slide photographs of 
scenes of the pueblo missions of 
Zuni, Acoma, Laguna, and the up- 
per Rio Grande country. 



\\ 



SHE 

E 



DONE HIM RIGHT! 



II 




Ask for CAMPUS CORDS 
by name, pltase! 



CAN'T bust 'EM 

CAMPUScl^gCORDS 

, " adi H^ — 



SAN FRANCISCO 






CALIFORNIA 



NONE GENUINE WITHOUT THIS 
LABEL INSIDE OF WAISTBAND 



JOIN THE CRUSADE AGAINST "PRETTY PANTS" 

A lad in tricky corduroys deserves to be ditched 
— especially when the gal sights the fine, masculine 
figure of a man in Campus Cords. 

Campus Cords keep faith with the university 
man in every detail of correct style. Their snug hip 
fit and straight hang are esteemed in major univer- 
sities from Coast to Coast. 

This handsome corduroy trouser wears like 
carborundum and retains its favored style-lines 
through countless cleanings or washings. 

The Campus Cords dealer is generally a first-rate 
judge of good style. See him now for new Campus 
Cords* and other clothing needs. 

*Also take a look at CAMPUS FLANNELS, CAMPUS 
TWEEDS, CAMPUS BUCKS and CAMPUS DUCKS 
— trousers with the same distinctive, conservative style- 
lines as Campus Cords. 

CAMPUS CORDS 

Perkins-Shearer Distributors 




FOOL THE FARMERS 








C C. 3 








AGGIES 



LAST YEAR 



. . . ONCE MORE 



Issued each week during- th« academic year. Entered at the 'ost Office at Colorado Springs as Second-Class Matter. 



THE TIGER 



Friday, November 24, 1933 




On 

Candy 

Counters 

Every 

Place 



The Biggest Nickel's 
worth of GOOD Candy 
You Ever Bought. Try 
It! 



WHICH 
FOR YOU ? 




Left: Maiden Form 
new ' ' Dec-La - Tay 
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Rjgfct / ■:-// f::h- 

I'tti/'thr MaitlenForm 
brassiere thai** fits like 
a stocking" seamless^ 
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the breast sections. 





Left: An evening vet 
sion of'*Dec-La-Tay 
with a veryloiV'SWun 
hack that can he atl 
jucted to three differ 
ent low necklines. 



Kigut: This brassiere 
ti i r e s exceptionally 
pood uplift tupport to 

the butt, pltts dia- 
phragm control 
try a ucll-fitted hand. 





Left: One of Xlaidci 
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Waist" girdles tha 
subtly smooths th 
hips and at the sam, 
time gii-es the uwist 
line a g/pntle curie. 



the lew Styles illustrated al>ove show you 
there Bre Maiden Form foundation garments t( 
take care of all types of figure! and to suit ever? 
Bottom* need- Each is designed to idetdize youi 
figlin in term! of fashion's latest demands. A&V 
\ our dealer to show you the new Maiden Forms— 
..r WTIte for free booklet. Dept. C4 Maiden Form 
Brassiere Co., Inc., 215 Fifth Ave., N. w York. 



AT ALL LEADING STORES 




UC V S tXT Oft 



deniTvtm 

SIEVES J 



CIH.DLIS-CAK.TIK. IflTI 



NONE GENUINE WITHOUT THIS LABEL 



Maiden Form Garments Sold 
in Colorado Springs at 

Kaufmans 



DEPARTMENT STORE 



riot uAe ty/k&ts" 



"I HUNTED all day 
long . . . and just knocked 
'em cold. 

"I smoke Chesterfields all 
the time and I'll tell the 
world . . . they're milder!" 




a::""'«?«Ei D ,/TJr 
esterlield 



the cigarette that's MILDER 

the cigarette that tastes better 



© 1933, 1-iccmr & Myers Tobacco Co. 



Strachan's 

SWEET SHOP 

Bijou and Nevada 



IRA C. DUGAN 

Jeweler and Optometriit 

Fine Watch and Clock Repairing 

Eyes Examined — Glasses Fitted 

— Lenses Duplicated — 

Phone M»in 1702-J 9 N. Tejon St, 



BISSEL'S pharmacy 

HENRY E. COPELAND, Prop. 



A Tiger Booster 



Tel. M. 980 Corner Dale and Webei 

PROMPT DELIVERY 



THE TIGER 



VOLUME XXXVI 



COLORADO COLLEGE WEEKLY NEWS-MAGAZINE 



Number 10 




♦ RADICAL 

Poet-Publisher 

Poet-philosopher-psychologist- 
politician, Max Eastman, first pub- 
lisher of John Dos Passos, Eugene 
O'Neil, and Sinclair Lewis in the 
year 1912, comes to COLORADO 
COLLEGE tomorrow evening to 
lecture in Perkins hall on "Science 
and the Future of Literature". 

Traveling thoroughly in post-rev- 
olution Russia soon after the over- 
throw of the Czarist regime, Radi- 
cal Eastman came away from the 
East thoroughly satiated with new 
thought, visited the new Germany, 
came home to America and wrote 
'"Venture", a criticism of Bolshe- 
vik Russia, "Marx and Lenin", 
comparison of theoretical and ac- 
tual socialism. 

Excluded from "Who's Who" 
supposedly by choice, Mr. Eastman 
authored famous "The Enjoyment 
of Poetry", now in textbook use in 
many colleges, and was one-time 
editor of radical and highbrow 
magazines, "The Masses" and "The 
Liberator". In these two latter pub- 
lications Dos Passos, O'Neil, and 
Lewis first saw the light. 

A curious combination of poet 
and politician, Eastman has also 
written "Art's Right to Indepen- 
dence" and "The Literary Mind." 
Tickets for the 8:15 lecture are av- 
ailable at Grimwood's book store 
and the Administration building. 

Ghost Town 

in water colors is the subject 
matter of an exhibit beginning next 
week when Bordman Robinson will 
|jhcw some water colors of Central 
City at the Broadmoor Art Acad- 
emy.The exhibit will last for two 
weeks. 

During the past week an exhibit 
comprising seventeen charcoal 
drawings by Arthur George Murphy 
has been on display. He gained not- 
oriety recently when his exhibit was 
in Los Angeles. Murphy is interest- 
ing because he started his career 
as a sports illustrator in New York. 
Due to poor health, he went to San 
Francisco, and it was there he made 
these drawings. He has done little 
else, but his work is of great prom- 
ise. 



Policies 

Policies, future plans and prob- 
lems were discussed at the biweek- 
ly board meeting of the Women's 
Athletic association Wednesday 
night. A full program of activities 
for the near future was outlined. 



Faculty To Lecture 

Covering a field ranging thru 
the physical and social sciences, 
faculty members of COLORADO 
COLLEGE will give a series of lec- 
tures during the year. These lec- 
tures are open to the public and 
present an opportunity to the stu- 
dents of the college to garner in- 
formation on a wide range of sub- 
jects. Open houses are to be held 
by the biology, chemistry, and 
physics departments, altho the 
dates have not been set. The fol- 
lowing list of lectures will be giv- 
en: 

Dec. 5, Dr. Guy Harry Albright, 
"The Distances to the Stars"; 
Jan. 9, Boardman Robinson, "Art 
and Nonsense"; Jan. 25, Dr. Edith 
C. Bramhall, to be announced; 
Feb. 20, Dr. Henry B. Dewing, 
"Byzantine Portraites; Personages 
of the Constantinople of Justini- 
an"; March 6, Prof. David Wen- 
dell Crabb, to be announced; 
March 20, Dr. C. William T. Pen- 
land, "Distribution of Plants"; 
April 3, Dr. Desmond Powell, 
"Emily Dickinson". 



Vocational Counsellor 

Miss Bessie East, the vocational 
guidance counsellor from Denver, 
will be at COLORADO COLLEGE 
Nov. 25, for several days to com- 
plete the interviews with the fresh- 
men women. 

Miss East, who has always been 
interested in people, after gradua- 
tion from college took up ballet 
dancing, which she followed for 
several years, but was forced to give 
up, due to ill health. After a year's 
rest she taught Latin in Trinidad. 

In time, her wish to aid people in 
finding a job led her into vocational 
guidance work. She has an office in 
Denver, which helps college girls to 
find jobs, both in school and after 
graduation. She goes to Boulder, 
and the University of Wyoming as 
well as COLORADO COLLEGE, ad- 
vising girls along vocational lines. 



In Rome 

4000 miles from here, Pres. C. 
C. Mierow was not long in ignor- 
ance of the outcome of the COLO- 
RADO COLLEGE-Wyoming foot- 
ball game as testified to by the 
Paris edition of the New York Her- 
ald, which carried an account of 
the game. 

"Rome", writes President Mie- 
row, "is the most wonderful city I 
have ever seen". So far, prexy 
has apparently been doing every- 
thing but taking a vacation and he 
and his family have visited the 
Forum, Coliseum, Pantheon, St. 
Peter's, St. Paul's and the Vatican 
museum and galleries. He has read 
a paper before a classical associa- 
tion. 



Sorry 

Last week's issue of THE 
TIGER stated that the Colorado 
Springs Drama club was defunct. 
This was a mistake as the Drama 
club is very much alive and takes 
an outstanding part in local dra- 
matics. THE TIGER regrets t h e 
mistake and apologizes to the 
members of the club. The organi- 
zation referred to in the article 
should have been the du Phoenix 
Drama club which has not been re- 
organized yet this year. 



Aspiring Orators 

of COLORADO COLLEGE are 
urged to be present at the tryouts 
preliminary to the selection of this 
year's debate team. Tryouts will 
be held in the pit at Palmer Hall 
at 4 o'clock Dec. 4. The subject 
is "Resolved: That the powers of 
the President of the United States 
should be substantially increased 
as a permanent policy." 

With a long trip thru the south- 
eastern part of the United States 
in the offing this season, the incen- 
tive for working for places on the 
squad is greater than for the past 
several years. 

D. Y. G. T. B. I. F. 

like N. R. A., W. A. A., A. W. 
S., etc., these letters have their 
meaning, at least they do for the 
new members of W. A. A. who 
were initiated Friday night at 
Bruin Inn. 

After a supper at the Inn, a 
ceremony was held in which Ro- 
berta Tapley, Pauline Kurachi, 
Jean Crawford, Dorothy Elston, 
Charline Clark, Ruth Crawford, 
Eileen Hale, Joanna Jolly, Martha 
Statton, Anne Espe and Doris 
Wylie were initiated, with Frances- 
ca Hall administering the oath. 

New members were awarded let- 
ters for participation for hiking, 
tennaquoit, swimming, archery and 
play day activities. The remaind- 
er of the evening was spent in 
dancing and listening to numbers 
by a girls' quartet composed of 
Ruth Crawford, Eileen Hale, Doro- 
thy Elston and Jean Crawford. 



♦ DRAMA 

Mr. and Mrs. Wrye 

play the romantic, though slight- 
ly screwy, leads opposite each 
other in Koshare's latest produc- 
tion, "Children of the Moon", to 
be shown the evenings of Dec. 5 
and 6 in Cogswell. 

Author Martin Flavin of "Crim- 
inal Code" and other hit opuses, 
has here a morbidly thrilling study 
of insanity brought to a head by 
the well-known "Silver Cord" 
mother complex. Gracia Wrye as 
Jane Atherton and husband Ted as 
Bannister, an aviator convalescing 
in her home, are of course in love 
but Louise Kirkpatrick as Jane's 
interfering mother does her best to 
goo the works. 

Actor Joe Rustin, screen hit of 
"Damsel in Distress", does Cock- 
ney Sergeant Higgs and Gordon 
Parker, also of "Damsel", plays 
the original crazy man, Grandpa 
Atherton. 

Petite Lyda Roark powders her 
blonde hair and acts the grand- 
mother while Freeland Carde, "Dr. 
Alquist" of "R. U. R.", plays 
Thomas, the blundering butler, and 
Fred Handke is the technical sci- 
entific interest, Dr. Wetherell. 



Fear 

must be eliminated in the pub- 
lic mind before prosperity can be 
brought back, and this can only be 
done under present conditions by 
stabilizing the monetary policy 
This was the theme of the lecture 
given by Dr. Jacob Swart of the 
Economic Department of Colorado 
College last Tuesday at 8:00 P. M. 
when he spoke on "Monetary Dif- 
ficulties under Planned Inflation". 

This is the first of a series of 
public lectures to be given by the 
Colorado College faculty. The next 
one will be given by Dr. Guy Al- 
bright on Astronomy. 



Up Popped the Devil 

at the special meeting of the A. 
S. C. C. last Tuesday night when 
old skeletons were renewed in the 
shape of a bill for services, mater- 
nal and otherwise, rendered by the 
famous homecoming cow. Scratch- 
ing their heads over the exorbitant 
fees for such services as the cow 
was able to render, council mem- 
bers were agreed that satisfaction 
was not equal to the charges, and 
such being so, it might be inferred 
that some other organization other 
than the council may stand the inci- 
dental expenses. 



THE TIGER 



Friday, November 24, 1933 



THE TIGER 




Editor LEW CROSBY 

Business Manager E. F. STAPLETON 

EDITORIAL STAFF 

Editors: Managing Editor, Bob Johnson; Campus, Joseph Lowe; Sports, 
Harold Marlowe, John Bicknell ; Society, Alice Hersom ; A. W. S., Ernestine 
Stroup ; Make-Up, Martin Legere ; Exchange, John Dickey ; News Editors. 
Miller Stroup, Fritz Baker, Peg Swan ; Pictorial, David Dentan. Society 
Staff — Luzilla Eubank, Mildred Fritchle, Muriel McClanahan, Sarah Mcln- 
tyre, Caroline Morrison, Lyda Roark, Sally Tompkins, Jane Walker, Imo- 
gene Young. Campus Editor — Joseph Lowe. News Editors — Edith Weaver, 
Miller Stroup. Albert Stubblefield. News Staff — Jake Johnson, David Den- 
tan, Gilbert Baylis, Alice Sutton, LaRue Wiley, Nanet Meredith, Claire 
Sweany, Elvira Cortellini, Ruth Mary Webster, Esther Alexander, Charles 
Dewing, Fred Baker. Ken Hall, Jennie Conway, Mark Schreiber, Marybel 
Poer. Louie Marie Mason, Ruth Liverman, Margaret Stewart, Ann Daniels, 
Conrad Brown. Ernestine Stroup, Peg Swan, Dale Ashbaugh, Frank John- 
son, Jean James. Dorothy Elston, Helen Miller, Ellen Perry, Susan Braer- 
ton, Dick Hall, Emma Louise Jordan. Proof Readers: Lucy Blackman, 
Frances Stevenson. Sports Staff — Ronald Rolph, James Ranson, Dick Alston, 
David Waters. 



+ Muttered 

campus complaints against THE TIGER passed from one thought- 
less and pedantic individual to another, no doubt satisfy the individuals, 
but as for doing any practical good the result is doubtful indeed. But 
— if complaining individuals would come to staff editors with their sug- 
gestions (complaints are just as welcome), the well-known mutterings 
could probably be worked into actual improvements and the mutterers' 
egos should be be tremendously bolstered up with their having done 
good! 



^ All Presidents 

of campus organizations now being feted by COLORADO COL- 
LEGE deans and president sincerely feel that the object of the current 
series of dinners is being attained. Striving for (closer cooperation 
among campus associations the dinners were instituted by college heads 
as instruments to attain this goal. On the success of these events hinges 
the future of organization cooperation at COLORADO COLLEGE. A 
hand to those responsible for foresight enough to play host to the presi- 
dents! 



Zeezee 

as a comedy would give nobody 
j hysterics, but as the first produc- 
tion of the newly hatched, Blue 
I Moon Players, was not as bad as 
| might have been expected. Passing 
1 over the comedy of errors which 
greeted the first-nighters in the 
form of house lights which refused 
to dim, and lines which were ex- 
ceedingly dim, the more finished 
entertainment of Tuesday night 
gives fair hopes for the future. 

Outsanding for her work was 
giggley, girlish Gratia Belle Black- 
man, who managed to sparkle in 
a dramatic vehicle painfully devoid 
of effervescence. Elizabeth Dewing 
was convincingly stiff as the old 
maid, while Mary Strachan tried 
hard to be sweet, simple and young, 
almost succeeding. Romantic Ralph 
Smith, Telegraph messenger Jack 
Kintz and bank president Wendel 
Carlson added local color to the 
performance and the realism of 
Ladies Aid members, Rose, Haimes, 
and Nadine Kent — of the tricky 
black velvet chapeau — was alone 
worth the price of admission. 

Miscast in the play was direc- 
tress ZeeZee Langstrom whose 
over-emphasis on action was only 
exceeded by her under emphasis on 
choice of costume. The plot, with 
all the charm and individuality of 
an old pair of shoes in a blinding 
rain storm, stooped to gay '90 an- 
achronisms: the city slicker, the 
simple country girl, and the old 
homestead. A simple tale nobly 
struggled with. 



NOTICE 
There will be no Tiger staff 
meeting, Tuesday, Nov. 28, be- 
cause THE TIGER will be pub- 
lished early next week. 



+ Traditions 

if they are kept in the right spirit, offer color and background to 
COLORADO COLLEGE. If, however, they are interpreted in a derog- 
atory manner, their goodness is lost in the cross feeling which results. 
I refer to one of the oldest traditions of this institution — the ringing of 
the Cutler Victory bell. College students were warned a year ago that 
if disturbance continued as to who should ring the bell the privilege 
would be taken away. Any group of individuals then, who assume a 
privilege rightfully accorded to the entire student body are not only 
creating a destructive rather than a constructive inter-organizational 
attitude, but are ricking this traditional privilege which has been a part 
of COLORADO COLLEGE these many years. Those at fault should 
think this matter over from a standpoint of the good of the majority, 
and h«lp to put our school spirit upon a more cooperative basis. 



Students living on the Western 
Slope may go home on a special 
train to Grand Junction for $5.50 
round trip. The train leaves at 6:30 
Nov. 30 and arrives in Colorado 
Springs at 6:00 P. M. December 
3 If interested call Main 2980. 



Applications for manager of 
Pan Pan must be given to Martha 
Kelly immediately. 

Pan Pan this year falls on Dec. 
11. It is the most hilarious time of 
the year, when all the students and 
all the townspeople gather at Per- 
kins hall. 



Dapper 

Johnny Metzler, impressario of no 
mean ability and erstwhile instiga- 
tor of the snappy entertainment 
featured each Saturday night at 
the Broadmoor Nite Club, is prob- 
ably bettem known on the COLO- 
RADO COLLEGE campus than 
when he studied here back in '28 
and '29. 

Johnny, Phi Gamma Delta and 
self-confessed non-activity man be- 
cause "he would rather work with 
his music," has seen his ambition 
rewarded with the plaudits of mu- 
sic-loving collegiates throughout 
the region for the excellence of his 
work. 

Johnny's sax, almost as large as 
Johnny, is one of the reasons for 
the popularity of the Saturday 
night dances this season at the 
Broadmoor Nite club. Offering as 
features an uptown "restaurant 
service", group and individual vo- 
cal and novelty numbers, combined 
with the speaker system which 
gives an even distribution of music 
throughout the club, Johnny and 
his band have made a host of 
friends in their new venture. 



The Silver Glade 

nobby dance spot for week-end- 
ers in Denver, is rapidly becoming 
the universal choice of entertain- 
ment-minded college students of 
the Rocky Mountain region. No 
efforts are spared by the manage- 
ment of the Cosmopolitan Hotel to 
make the Glade an ideal rendez- 
vous for collegiates. 

Every Friday night dance con- 
tests are held with an outstanding 
couple from each school in the 
eastern Rocky Mountain confer- 
ence as judges. Winners last week 
included Miss Rosita Sutton of 
East High in Denver and Miss 
Ruby Hodnette, Tri Delt from 
Boulder. 

Large dinner parties have also 
become popular with the Tri Delts 
from C. U. entertaining 125 guests 
at their annual Alumni Pledge Din- 
ner dance recently. 



The Pastime Of Kings — 

chess — is expected to find many 
ardent devotees in the faculty and 
student body of COLORADO 
COLLEGE following the revival of 
interest renewed by the chess tour- 
nament being sponsored by Alfred 
Grimwood and Maurice Good- 
enough. The tourney is open only 
to faculty and students of the col- 
lege, with nominal fees and a 
knowledge of the essentials of the 
game being the only requirements 
for entrance. 

Plans have not as yet been def- 
initely set, altho when enough 
players enter the tournament, a 
date will be set. A prize will be 
given the winner. 

Anyone interested in chess is re- 
quested to notify either Grimwood 
or Goodenough. 



Friday, November 24, 1933 



THE TIGER 



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Keyhole Keeper 

Began wandering around this 
week doing a little "thoughts 
while strolling" a la Mclntyre and 
thus stumbled on my weekly stint. 
What's the name of this red-and- 
kinky - haired freshman girl with 

the big brown eyes? one of 

my favorite people — Frank Jamie- 
son John Dos Passos' 1919 

as deliberately lewd a book as ever 

I read however, a picture 

of photographic accuracy of t h e 
ordinary thought and talk of the 

man in the street Rip Mid- 

dlestetter, a La Junta, Colo., boy, 
who made good on the campus. 
.... one word description of Mu- 
riel McClanahan — syish 

Blakely, one of our better liked 
professors and yet respect- 
ed rumors of the object of 

Stapleton's recent visit to Kansas 
City as marriage — to one of t h e 

local gals from Palisade 

Willa Meinholtz looking very effec- 
tive in a skin tight blue satin dress 
liberally slashed with black net. 

soon time for Pan-Pan, isn't 

it? Mr. and Mrs. Wrye are 

playing leads opposite each other 
in the current Koshare play now 

in rehearsal Children of the 

Moon is the name of the opus and 
a very queer one indeed .... al- 
beit stirring personal nomi- 
nation for just about the cutest 
bug's ear in school : Jean Horan 
Jake Johnson's straight mil- 
itary school walk Samuel 

Stanhope Stryker Brown strikes 
his students as being a strange 

gent and Lois Waldorf, one 

of our more vivid types of beauty 

people that are very bustling 

and energetic invariably enervate 
me so that I haven't a shred of 

life left Mr. D?ehler and 

his never absent celluloid visor 
helping some "dead" man out of 
the stands at the Mines game . . . 
Only Yesterday, a finely and care- 
fully wrought picture though over- 
emphasized on the sob-stuff side 

and the fat nigger gal in 

the colored choir here recently 
singing St. Louis Blues was for 



many a big emotional set-to . . she 
had plenty of the well-known 
"ugh" (said in a loud grunt) . . . 
Tom Patterson overheard greeting 
his Pinkie-winkie upon first seeing 
her in Palmer early in the morn- 
ing: "Gooday gooday, Miss 
Schultz, did you have a good 

night's rest?" if Francesca 

Hall were more sylph-like she'd be 
quite attractive Evelyn Mc- 
lntyre and Joe Rohrer are that 
way — something should be done 

about her ennui Simpson 

seems to be definitely out of t h e 
Roark league, with Riley stepping 

in whatever became of the 

<rirl with the longish straight black 
h~>ir brushed away from her face 
who sat to the right of Bettv Fos- 
ter on the Homecoming Queen 

fl"at rumors of George Mc- 

Knight, the Kansas City caperer, 
returning next semester .... this 
Crosshairs fellow is alwavs chang- 
ing his looks — now he's got his 
mustache, now he hasn't it ... . 
Art Sham on Wood avenue wheel- 
ing a baby carriage around the 

block a tan wicker one . . . 

a name so reeking of New Eng- 
land one'd think it could be found 
only in H?wthorne: Malvina Trim- 
ble it took the Phi Gams 

two months to get used to the 
wallpaner that one of their promi- 
nent alumni chose for their bull- 
room it has a sort of tan 

and gold background with brown 
spreading pa'm branches liberally 
sprinkled with orange and purplish 
nasturtiums 



Campus Chic 

There are some girls who always 
look nice around school. It is re- 
ally an art and I ois Waldorf has 
attained it. We like especially her 
green and brown ensemble which 
makes her hair even more lovely. 
The dress is ?n olive green checked 
wool with large sleeves and a 1 1 e 
collar which has brown fur tails in 
pprh end. She wears a brown fur 
iacket and a larce brown hat set 
saucily on one side. Her shoes are 
Teen and her purse and gloves 
nrown. She wears, so^et-mes, with 
the iacket. a rabbit's ^air dress of 
li"ht «r.lden brown. Its lines are 
"raceful and chic. She walks with 
the assured step of one who looks 
well. Yes, Lois, we like your taste. 



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THE TIGER 



Friday, November 24, 193; 



In 1902 

A small party of students enjoy- 
ed a trip through the Cave of the 
Winds Saturday afternoon. Tnhey 
reported that the new electric light 
system installed in the cave this 
summer makes doubly interesting 
the formation of that most remark- 
able cave. 

•••••.<•■ 

The following men are wearing 
the Kappa Sigma Soike: Graham, 
Merrill, Coomes, Clough, Keyser. 
^rdy, Briggs, Whipple, Carey, and 
Deez. 

••« ••• *■ 

The result of the election of offi- 
cers of the Senior Class, Monday 
after Chapel was; 

President — Gil Smith. 
Vice President — Helen Clark 
Treas Sec't — Harold Roberts 
Ass't Treasurer — Amy Metcalf 
••• ••• ••• 

Delta Phi Theta has secured a 
louse at 30 West Cache la Poudre 
street for a chapter house. 

-•• .*■ ••- 

S 1 i n e. Sheldong, and Givins 
snent four days in Devils Head 
Country last week on a hunting 
party. 

*■ .«. *■ 

Even the Seniors are having a 
hard time this week arranging for 
?11 their dates within the two night 
limit. ■» 

•*> ••• ••■ 

On Tues. nite Oct. 15, two young 
snorts (intoxicated), not members 
of the College broken nineteen 
plate glass windows in Palmer Hall, 
and cut down two elm trees, throw- 
ing them against the front door; 
through the sagacity of the police, 
the two vandals were soon discover- 
ed. 

* ♦ * 

The second college dance was 
given at the Kinnikinnick last Sat. 
evening. It was one of the pleasant- 
est social affairs of the month, and 
all seemed to enjoy themselves to 
the utmost. The music was excel- 
lent, and thus contributed consid- 
erably to the eniovment of the ev- 
ening. Prof, and Mrs. Ahlers were 
the Chaperones. 



Outstanding 

speakers in the Rocky Mountain 
district may be brought to speak 
at a new series of dinner lectures 
to be sponsored by the faculty of 
COLORADO COLLEGE. 

Arrangements are in the hands 
of a committee headed by Dr. Lew- 
is W. Abbott and includes Rev. 
Paul Roberts, Rev. Charles Brown, 
Dr. W. S. Schafer, Dr. H. M. 
Corning, Neal Vollmer, Russell D. 
' aw, Mrs. Trudeau Thomas. T. W. 
Ross, Mrs. Ted Thomas, William 
Jackson, Alfred Cowles III, Dr. 
McConnell. Alice van Diest, Miss 
Amanda Ellis, Dr. Edith Bramhall, 
Mrs. Cushina, Mrs. W. G. Elmslie, 
Mrs. Meredith Hare, W. F. C. Nel- 



In 67 Years 

if you are still living, you will 
get the opportunity of seeing the 
contents of the iron box to be 
found just inside the door of the 
museum in Palmer hall. Many 
have been the inquiries as to what 
the chest contains. There have 
been countless speculations on the 
contents and the purpose of it. It 
is addressed "To t h e citizens of 
Colorado Springs of the twenty- 
fi r- 1 century. To be opened after 
midnight. Dec. 31. A. D. 2000." | 

In the next issue of THE TI- 
GER will be a description of the j 
contents of the box. 



An Informal Supper 

was given by Acting President 
Hershey on Monday, Nov. 20, for 
the presidents of the six men's fra- 
ternities on the campus. His other 
auests of the evening included Mr. 
William Copeland, Mr. Donald 
Glidden. Dean William Lovit, Prof. 
Henry Mathias, Prof. Arthur G. 
Sharp, Jr. The discussion centered 
about the best method of interest- 
in? new students in coming to 
COLORADO COLLEGE. 

Acting President Hershey will 
entertain the president of the four 
sororities at an informal dinner at 
6-00 o'clock on Monday evening, 
Nov. 27, at which time the same 
subiect will be the topic of conver- 
sation. 



Senior Women 

were the guests of Dean Fau- 
teaux at a dinner on Wednesday 
evening, Nov. 22. Among many 
other things, the subject of Christ- 
mas carols was discussed. It has 
long been a custom at COLORA- 
DO COLLEGE for the senior wom- 
en to sing Christmas carols on the 
night preceding the holidays, and 
it was decided to continue this tra- 
dition. 



Impressed 

by a "certain studious atmos- 
phere which pervades" Mills col- 
lege where she is working for her 
master's degree, Mariana Sackett. 
'33. has written a letter to Prof. 
F. W. Douglas, which is pertinent 
to collegiate affairs. She tells of a 
new science course at Mills college 
'"eluding six weeks each of chem- 
istry, nhvsics and biology, with the 
rest of the year spent in minor sci- 
ences. 

Another alumna of COI ORA- 
DO COLLEGE who received a fel- 
lowship at Mills, Josenhine Dicki- 
son, '33, writes to Professor Doug- 
las that "it proved a rather diffi- 
cult matter to find a subiect that 
could be dealt with at Mills that 
we had not covered at COLORA- 
DO COLLEGE. 



SoR 



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Copyright. 1933. The 

American Tobacco 

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Friday, November 24, 1933 



THE TIGER 



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Where We Go 

"Where do we go from here' 
was the question put to the student 
body at chapel Tuesday, when Rev. 
T. H. Mathieson, pastor of the Firs* 
Christian church spoke. 

In his words "the way out is to 
change our present economic man, 
motivated by self-interest only, to 
a society-centered man. Human 
nature is responsible for our condi- 
tion and only by lifting up human 
nature, can a new condition be 
brought about. World-wide brother- 
hood is the only solution." 



A Prophet and Pessimist 

Looks Northwest and writes a 
documentive and narrative history 
entitled, "Where Rolls the Oregon." 
The book is the third volume in the 
series, "Overland to the Pacific," 
which is edited by Dr. Hulbert. It 
reveals startling facts about the 
Oregon Trail and the settlement of 
the surrounding country. 

As it h?s iust been published and 
will be in Coburn Library within a 
week. 



Discussions 

of political events by interesting 
and rble speakers feature the Sun- 
da ,r evem'nsr meetinsrs of COLO- 
RADO COLLEGE'S Foreign Rela- 
I tions club. Hitler and the Nazi 
government were discussed at one 
meeting by H. Moore of Denver, 
who has spent much time traveling 
thruout Germanv and studying the 
condition of the government of 
that country. Murl Houseman in 
another speech told about his trav- 
els in Russia and on the continent. 

The Carnegie institute is furnish- 
ing accurate information regarding 
tonics of political interest thru the 
aid of an appropriation set aside 
to carrv on work of this sort. 

Meetings of the club are held at 
the residence of Dr. Edith Bram- 
hall on Sunday nights at 7:30. All 
students interested in government 
or political science are urged to at- 
tend. 



Musical Meeting 

The first musical program meet- 
ing of the year will be held by Eu- 
terpe in Perkins hall, Tuesday Nov. 
28 at 7:30 o'clock. There will be 
a social hour in the clubroom after- 
ward. 

The program is as follows: 

I. Piano: Kammenoi Ostrow - - - 

----- Rubinstein 
Jack Kintz 

II. Voice: "Myself When Young" - 

from "In a Persian Garden * - 

Lehmann 

Clifford Kolsrud, Miss Emily Lyders 
accompanying. 

III. Dance: "Shadow Waltz 
Pauline Nelson, Jane Wahtola. ac- 
companying. 

IV. Adoration - - - - Borowski 

Dean Trembly 

V. Piano: "Malaguena - Lecuona 

Jane Wahtola 






THE TIGER 



Friday, November 24, 1933 



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All Intra Fraternity Teams 

Sport editor's note: 

The following is an all-star 
intra-fraternity basketball team 
picked by the sports staff of this 
paper. This is the first time in the 
history of COLORADO COLLEGE 
that such a team has been picked. 
The players represent those individ- 
uals who stood out most prominent- 
ly in their various games. The hard- 
est job was the picking of forwards. 
Practically every team has a pair 
of sharpshooters who played excel- 
lent ball. Hence . . they were pick- 
ed on a point basis. 

First Team 
Forward, Bergland — Sigma Chi; 
Forward, Hibbard — P h i Gamma 
Delta; Forward, K. Hall, utility 
man — Phi Delta Theta; Center, 
! O'Neil— Beta Theta Pi; Guard, 
Huff — Kappa Sigma; Guard,, Gus- 
tavson — BetaTheta Pi. 

Second Team 
Guard, Sode — Beta Theta Pi; 
Guard, McDonough — Sigma Chi; 
Forward, D. Hall— Phi Delta The- 
ta; Forward, Jamieson — Kappa 
Sigma. 

Honorable Mention 
Slater — Phi Gamma Delta, Glea- 
son — Beta Theta Pi, Price — Kappa 
Sigma, Haines — Sigma Chi, Miles 
— Delta Alpha Phi; Dentan — In- 
dependent. 



Have your Nugget photo- 
graphs made now and avoid 
the rush 

c*€iery 

STUDIO 

Fine Portraiture 
Across from the campus 



January 20 

COLORADO COLLEGE opens 
its conference wrestling season 
with a trip to Boulder to engage 
Colorado U.'s grapplers. Coach 
Howard Waite announced today 
that all potential wrestlers start 
training immediately for this first 
meet. 

Teachers in Greeley Feb. 3, D. 
U. here Feb. 16, the conference 
meet in Fort Collins, Feb. 23 and 
24, and a Y. M. C. A. meet with 
date undecided complete the Ti- 
gers' wrestling season schedule. 

Interfraternity tourneys will b e 
held shortly after the Christmas in- 
terim, with Kappa Sigs' wrestlers 
favored to repeat their title-win- 
ning of the last two years. Should 
they repeat, they gain permanent 
possession of the trophy. 

With only one letterman back 
this season, Charlie Winter, heavy- 
weight, new men have excellent 
chances for anything from 118 
pound class to heavyweights. 



SHEFF & SON 

SUPERIOR FORD SERVICE 
827 N. Tejon M. 1317 



TIGER HUDDLE 

Tomorrow, the last page of a 
1933 edition of "Tiger Footballers" 
will be read and completed as a 
fighting team travels to Denver 
where they encounter the strong 
Aggie eleven. Most of us enjoyed 
j the preview to this most interesting 
; novel when we read of the pros- 
j pects for our 1933 eleven and al- 
\ most burst with enthusiasm during 
i the introduction when Teachers 
were swept off the leaves. I think 
the pages of that game were 7-9 
inclusive. But things got worse as 
i we went on. Injuries blotted out 
j line after line and it looked like a 
j most tragic ending was due through 
DPges 26 to 51, when Denver and 
Boulder completely stamped out 
those leaves and left only blanks. 
Then things pepped up as the cli- 
max was approaching and Brig- 
I ham Young, enacting the part of 
j the hero came along — lo! and be- 
: hold, he tore out 26 pages. 

And then the next seven pages 
| (d?ys) told us about one of our 
j authors ("Dutch Clark) and his re- 
I turn to the Tiger lair. Ah! the con- 
j elusion was upon us. "Dutch" was 
I reading some 18 pages back, and 
the Oredissers went home with 23 
comes of "Tiger Footballers". 

The 1933 edition was a good 
book, but we are all looking for- 
ward to the revised 1934 edition, 
and we take time out to wish "the 
big, bad Tiger" a most successful 
huddle in '34. 



The Rocky Mountain Intercollegiate 

Press Association all conference 
football selections are at the present 
time being compiled by the sports 
staff of this paper and will be sent 
in to the Utah Chronical. The com- 
pilings of all sports editors of the 
Press association will be tabulated 
and the announcement of the all- 
Conference, both first and second 
teams will be published on this page 
Dec. 1. 



Intramural Basketball 

The inter-fraternity basketball 
games played on Tuesday night ol 
last week were easy victories foi 
the Betas and Phi Delts, the former 
winning from the Delta Alpha Phis 
by a score of 27-8, and the Phi 
Delts easily disposing of the Kappa 
Sigs 30-11. O'Neill and Gustavson 
were the high point men for the 
winners of the first game and in the 
second game the Hail brothers ac- 
counted foi 22 points. 

But the big upset of the season 
occured on Thursday night follow- 
ing, when the Sigma Chi five out- 
played the unbeaten Phi Gams 38- 
17, Bergiand scoring 18 points for 
the winners. 

The decisive victory for the Sig- 
ma Chi team resu'ted in a tie for 
first piace with the Fijis, each hav- 
ing lost one game as Sigma Chi was 
beaten early in the season by the 
BeU-s. This tie necessitates a play- 
off s^r.es of three games to decide 
ihe championship. The first of these 
games is scheduled for Tuesday 
:ight at Cossitt Gymnasium, and 
snouJd bring out a large crowd. 

In the other two games played on 
the same evening Betas won the 
first from the Independents 40-2, 
this score being the highest made 
for the present season. O'Neill was 
responsible for a total of 25 points 
for the winning team. 

The final game of the evening 
save Kappa Sigma a score of 19- 
9 over the Delta Alphs, Schreiber 
leading with nine points for the 
winners. 



01' Cutler 

spelled music to the ears of C. C. 
students, fans and football players 
Saturday night. With the Bengals 
on a long end of a 23-0 score. 
Mines went home with the dope 
bucket spilled all over them. Nev- 
ertheless, there wasn't a true Tiger 
heart in the stands that wasn't torn 
between loyalty to their school and 
the success and good of "Dutch". 

Tomorrow, the Tigers spell "fin- 
is" to their 1933 grid campaign and 
from all indications, the farmers 
from Ft. Collins will be in for one 
of the hardest old football games 
they have played for years. 



Students who wish to attend the 
C. C. frosh vs. Mines frosh game 
here on Thanksgiving will be ad- 
mitted on the first extra ticket in 
their blue books plus twenty cents. 

According to Joe Irish, all stu- 
dents going to Denver Saturday to 
attend the C. C.-Aggies game are 
requested to sit in the east stands 
generally used by Denver students. 
This space will be reserved for C. 
C. students and townspeople. 

Football 

coaching duties were consider- 
ably enlarged yesterday in the 
assembly at Perkins hall, when 
Coach Van de Graaff, in a locker 
room type exhortation, "pointed" 
the student body for the Aggie 
game. 

Realizing that spirit was at a 
low ebb in the school, Van de 
Graaff broke forth in a thundering 
attack on the school's attitude of 
the team in an attempt to fire his 
audience for the game. 

"If we beat Aggies," said Van 
de Graaff, "I will be prouder with 
this year's record than that of any 
other year." 




Friday, November 24, 1933 



THE TIGER 



\ Radio 

dance was given by the Sigma 
Zhis on Saturday night, Nov. 18, 
ollowing the C. C.-Mines football 
jame. It was an informal affair, 
ind tea and cakes were served to 
he guests at the close of the even- 
ng. 
These radio dances have become 
popular institution at the Sigma 
l\\i house. As not more than seven- 
een guests may be invited on Sat- 
lrday evening and not more than 
ix on Sunday evening, these dan- 
:es are not recognized as a regular 
hapter function. For this reason, 
he Sigma Chis have been entertain- 
ng frequently on otherwise dull 
Sunday evenings. 



Year Old 

Betty Briggs, in natty gray mili- 
ary cape and kepi, featured the 
ntertainment offered to the guests 
it the Theta Subscription dance, 
riday, Nov. 1 7. Betty has the dis- 
inction of being the youngest co-ed 
it COLORADO COLLEGE. 

Combining business with plea- 
ure, the party, held at the Broad- 
noor Nite Club, was a huge success 
vith over 300 guests present. For 
hose whose skill at cards overbal- 
inced the appeal of Johnny Metz- 
ers' music, bridge was offered. 



fri-Fraternity Dance 

Alpha Phi chapter of Gamma 
D hi Beta will attend a dance with 
he Tau chapter of Colorado Agri- 
ultural College and Theta chapter 
if Denver University, given at the 
3eta Theta Pi house in Denver, ! 
Saturday, Nov. 25. 

This practice of having all the ! 
state chapters of a fraternity or 
sorority meet together in a social i 
way is rapidly gaining in popular- 
ity. ! 



CHAPEL CALENDAR 
Tuesday, Nov. 28, 10:00 a. m. — 

Chapel service. Speaker 
George Kirk of the Colorado 
Fuel & Iron Company, Pueblo. 

Carrie Co-Ed's Letter 

Dear ole sis, 

I have been spending an unrea- 
sonable amount of time attending 
inter-fraternity basketball games. 
They are held at Cossitt on Tues- 
day and Thursday evenings, and 
run close competition for the 'libe' 
as place of sojourn for undated fe- 
males and undating males. 

Each fraternity has played every 
other one, the result being that we 
are now in the midst of a final 
play-off between the Phi Gams and 
the Sigs. It was too exciting last 
Thursday. People knocked cold, 
tripped, pummeled, and socked. 
This makes the thrill of fast bas- 
ketball two-fold. Just a bunch of 
the boys having good, clean fun! 

However, Tuesday was equally 
fast, and they all pulled through 
unharmed, so I guess the lads 
mean well. 

The men all sit in huddles down- 
stairs and try to think of clever re- 
marks. The gals all sit upstairs — 
in sorority rows. Occasionally one 
manages to drag her every-other- 
heart-beat upstairs with her. Laugh- 
ter and shouting carry out into the 
night — and the games are great 
fun. Quite an institution! 

I'm off to Denver this weekend 
for the Aggie game and the Cos- 
mo. 

Your ever-loving spectator of 
sports, 

Carrie. 



Across from campus 

Wagner Fults Studio 

Official Photographer for 
COLORADO COLLEGE 

"PORTRAITS THAT PLEASE" 
Burns Theatre Bldg. Elevator Service 



THE DENTAN 
PRINTING CO. 




COLORADO SPRINGS 

T^rinters 



SOCIAL CALENDAR 

Friday, Nov. 24 — 

Delta Gamma Tea Dance 
Phi Gamma Delta Dance 
Delta Alpha Phi Tea Dance 

Saturday, Nov. 25 — 

C. C.-C. A. C. in Denver 
Lecture — Max Eastman 

Sunday, Nov. 26 — 
Newman Club 

Tuesday, Nov. 28 — 
A. W. S. Board 
Euterpe 

Thursday, Nov. 30 — Thanksgiving 
Day- 
Kappa Sigma Breakfast Dance 

Saturday, Dec. 2 — 

Kappa Kappa Gamma Subscrip- 
tion Dance 



Brownies 

and tea were served to the Kap- 
pas at the Sigma Chi tea dance on 
Friday afternoon, Nov. 1 7. After a 
pleasant afternoon of dancing, the 
departing guests responded to three 
Sigma Chi songs with the Kappa 
Kappa Gamma Medley. 



Sword And Shield 

Dancing in the spacious home of 
Mrs. Reginald Sinclaire, pink 
punch served in the bar room, and 
an acrobatic military dance given 
by petite Betty Briggs during in- 
termission were the high points of 
the Phi Delta Theta pledge dance 
which was given on Saturday 
night, Nov. 18. The illuminated 
sword and shield which was hung 
on the wall in the ball room fur- 
nished the light for the merry mak- 
ers. The programs were blue with 
the Phi Delt crest in silver on the 
cover. 



Small Gavels 

bearing the names of the guests 
and serving as placecards were re- 
ceived by the Presidents of COLO- 
RADO COLLEGE at the annual 
Presidents banquet sponsored by 
the A. W. S. board. The guests, 
who were invited by Mrs. Fau- 
teaux, assembled in the Bemis 
Commons at 6:30 on Saturday 
evening, Nov. 18. After a delicious 
dinner, Miss Ruth Edwards, Presi- 
dent of the A. W. S., welcomed 
the guests and introduced each 
President to the group. The speak- 
er of the evening was Acting 
President Hershey, who spoke on 
the subject of student participation 
in extra-curricular activities. Wel- 
come dinner music was furnished 
by the victorious ringing of the 
Cutler bell. 



Meadow Gold 

Ice Creams 
Sherbets 
Dairy Products 



M 



owry s 




Shampoo and Finger Wave 
50 cents 

MARY SUTTON 
BEAUTY SHOP 

M. 1186 105 E. Cache la Poudre 



To Maintain 
A Payroll in 
Colorado Springs 




mmrm 

COAL/ 

Phone Main 577 



SHORTHAND IN 12 LESSONS 

Thousands of students find ABC Short- 
hand of tremendous value in taking ac- 
curate lecture and reading notes — This 
shorthand can be mastered quickly in 12 
easy lessons without an instructor — Com- 
plete course now sells for $1.00 at 

Pikes Peak Book & Stationery Co. 



</\ O. </\ 


Thanksgiving Dance 


FRIDAY^C. 1, 9 P. M. 


BROADMOOR NITE CLUB 


Johnny Metzler's Orchestra 


Couples $1 Stags $.75 



8 



THE TIGER 



Friday, November 24, 193 



KOSHARE presents 

Cliildroiio/TIioHfloon 9 ' 



Tuesday, December 5th 
Wednesday, December 6th 



COGSWELL THEATRE 
Bemis Hall 



General Admiission 50 
Reserved Admission 75 



$1.00 A Week! 

Buys a new standard 
Typewriter 

New Portables: 

$14.95 
$29.50 
$34.50 
$45.00 
$60.00 

The 

Typewriter 

Man 

125 N. Tejon M. 95 

ft 8 » ;i »» 8 » i ; i iiii i iii i ;i i; i iii i iiii mn:u« 




Exhausted 

by a long field trip, the geology 
class was just getting well settled 
in the geology bus when the driver 
discovered that it was out of gas. 
Visions of a long night spent in 
the wilds and remembrances of 
school bus tragedies assailed the 
students. 

Then some one remembered a 
coal mine in the vicinity. An anx- 
ious quarter of an hour ensued 
while the driver went in search of 
gasoline. At last he returned and 
the group continued on their way. 
Nov. 15, will be remembered by 
the geologists as the date of a har- 
haowing experience. 



Margaret B. Bennett is now do- 
ing legal work for federal depart- 
ments in Washington D. C. Miss 
Bennett attended C. C. in 1924, 
was graduated from Vassar in 1925 
received her law degree from Col- 
umbia, and was admitted to Bar in 





TEXACO 




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Hail! The Pioneer 

The first time in several years 
that a Colorado football eleven has 
been able to conquer a Utah aggre- 
gation took place last Saturday on 
the Pioneer gridiron. The Utes 
were sadly outclassed by a fighting 
D. U. eleven and shortly after the 
third period got under way, there 
was no general feeling as to the 
outcome of the game. 

Some 15,000 fans attended the 
game and from the beginning of 



the game to the end there were 
plenty of thrills offered to the cash 
patrons. Congratulations to the 
Denver school and to the team 
which carried its colors to victory 
Saturday. 



Gladys Geraghty, who received 
her A. B. from COLORADO COL- 
LEGE in 1931, and then her Mas- 
ter of Science from University of 
Colorado School of Medicine, is 
now a technician at Glockner Hos- 
pital in Colorado Springs. 



Subscribe NOW for The 

GAZETTE TELEGRAPH 

Morning — Evening — Sunday "All The News All The Time" 



Daily Only 
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Daily and Sunday 
20c per week 



Combination 
35c per week 



"/ haven't heard 
from home in two 
weeks and a check 
would look good right 
now." 

"Why don't you call 
them up?" 

"That's an idea. You 
get a thought every 
other month" 





It's simple just to give Long Distance 
your home telephone number and talk 
with the whole family. Start the habit 
now — you can reverse the charges when 
you like. Telephoning every week or so is 
a lot easier and quicker than writing letters. 



Ask "Long Distance" for the night rate 
(after 8:30 p. m.) to your home town. 



{Friday, November 24, 1933 



THE TIGER 



STABILITY 



SECURITY 

are synonomous with the name 



SATISFACTION 



FAIR MOUNT 

THE FULLY COMPLETED AND ENDOWED 

A II S O t E U 





IS A MASTERPIECE OF CLASSIC BEAUTY 



For complete information write W. T. SHAY, Secy., 515 Security Bldg., Denver 



EXCHANGE. 



Very Logical 

A student in a logic examination 
at Marquette university ran out of 
material after writing three pages 
and he wrote, "I don't think that 
you'll read this far and just to 
prove it I'll tell you about the foot- 
ball game I saw yesterday." For 
another five pages the student de- 
scribed the game and he was never 

called for it. 

••• ••• ••• 

More Proverbs 

Officials at Auburn college are 
condemning the fads of the young- 
er generation co-eds of the school. 
They say that the modern co-ed 
does not known the meaning of the 
word "convention." It was sug- 
gested that the school adopt the 
slogan, "An ounce of convention is 

worth a pound of lure." 
••• ••• ••■ 

Married students at the Univer- 
sity of Wyoming average better 
grades than their non-married 
friends. Which proves that the 
single people have all the fun in 
life. 

— Doane Owl. 
.•• ••. .*. 

The laziest guy handed in his 

exam paper, on which he said, 

"Please see Smith's paper for my 

answers." 

■•- .». *«• 

Trying to keep a girl pleased is 

just like lathering the mirror and 

shaving the reflection. 

—Pink Rag. 
••> *•■ ••• 

"Each summer for three years I 
have had the pleasure of entertain- 
ing an old friend from California, 
a movie director out there. Each 
time he brought his wife — three of 
the most attractive women I ever 
met." 

— Kansas City Starbeams. 
••• •«• •*• 

The Purdue Exponent rumors 

the formation of a "We-Ain't-Been- 

to-the-World's-Fair — But-we-Have- 

Heard-AII-About-It" Club, for the 

convenience and protection of the 

small minority that stayed at home 

last summer. 



Friends University followed the 
lead set by Hutchins of Chicago 
University in abolishing compulsory 
classes. No more need any student 
fear three cuts or more; he is on 
his own. This action is an indica- 
tion that University authorities re- 
alize men and women are able to 
think for themselves. 

— Doane Owl. 

-•- .«. .«. 

Just Like A Woman 

After much research we find that 
a woman's tragedy of life is as 
follows: 

You meet him — You like him — 
You love him — You kiss him — You 
lose him — Damn men! 

Men shoot the persons they hate. 

Women shoot the men they love. 

Ain't women the queerest things 
you can imagine, bless their little 
hearts — The Doan Owl. 



monthly. Throughout the year, 
dances and other social functions 
actuated by the club are enjoyed 
by the members. 

Shifting Money Values 

In international exchange have 
at least one direct influence on 
COLORADO COLLEGE. The cost 
in United States currency of the 
many foreign periodicals to which 
the Coburn Library subscribes has 
almost doubled. Up to the present 
the library has been able to con- 
tinue with nearly all of its maga- 
zine subscriptions, in spite of the 
fact that book appropriations have 
been cut on an average of 25%. 
The current money fluctuations 
may force a reduction in the li- 
brary's fine assortment of periodi- 
cals. 

It is interesting to note that 
when exchange was favorable t o 
the United States, a certain Euro- 



pean magazine charged a higher 
price here than abroad. So far 
there have been no signs of a 
change in its rates to correspond 
to the changed situation. 

In this, as in so many other 
ways, the complex and widespread 
influence of the N.R.A. and the 
world economic situation is brought 
home to us. 



At Connecticut College the use 
of rouge is distinctly a senior priv- 
ilege. That would be one way of 
telling seniors from freshman co- 
eds. 



During this year's world series in 
Washington, the radio announcer 
frequently made mention of a blue 
pigeon which kept flying down o n 
the playing field during the game. 
Later on it developed that it was 
not a blue pigeon at all, just the 
blue eagle which wanted to make 
sure that the games were being 
played according to the code. 



Founded In 1930 

The Newman Club, a Rational or- 
ganization of Catholic students in 
non-Catholic institutions, is repre- 
sented on this campus by the 
COLORADO COLLEGE Newman 
club. Founded here in 1930, the 
organization has since been very 
active. The primary motive of the 
group is to offer a medium where- 
by Catholic students at COLO- 
RADO COLLEGE may become 
better acquainted and may attend 
monthly corporate communions. 
Informal meetings are held twice 



Colorado College 

TEXT BOOKS 

AND SUPPLIES 

C. C. and Fraternity 

Stationery 

Laundry Bags — $2.00 Each 

Murray Drug Co. 

Across From the Campus 



The 

STANDARD 

BOTTLING 

COMPANY 

Denver, Colo. 
Specializing in 

Punches 
Soft Drinks 

For All Types 

of University 

Gatherings 



. 



10 



THE TIGER 



Friday, November 24, 1933 



You and Your Boy — A Partnership 

By helping him take advantage of his age, you make it possible for him to: 

1. Enter his first business venture with his father as partner. 

2. Learn the value of consistent saving. 

3. Have insurance when he needs it and at his present low rate. 

4. Create an estate thru the best and safest investment in the world. 

5. Establish a guaranteed retirement income for himself. 

THE PENN MUTUAL LIFE RENE P. BANKS, GENERAL AGENT 

INSURANCE COMPANY 1016 Patterson Building 

Established 1847 Denver, Colorado 

Independence Square, Philadelphia 



^ "INN" 

ACROSS FROM MURRAY'S 



Same quality work — 
a real Hair cut for 

PETE'S BARBER SHOP 

8 E. Cucharras 



Quality "Master" Cleaners 

Only one Quality and the 
Price is uniform 

M in 1-8-1-1 10 E. Kiowa 

H. A. Thompson 



PHOTOGRAPHS 

The Gift that only you can give 
Official Photographer, C. C. Nugget 

PAYTON STUDIO 

30 S. Tejon Phone M. 477-J 




COLORADO COLLEGE 

COLORADO SPRINGS, COLORADO 



FULLY ACCREDITED 
COEDUCATIONAL 
NON-SECTARIAN 



VIEW OF SHOVE CHAPEL FROM LEFT 
OF PALMER HALL ENTRANCE 



One of the six LIBERAL ARTS COLLEGES of the country 
on the Harvard Professorship Exchange. 

"A College which has the life and vigor of the West combined 
with the carefulness and standards of the East." 




VIEW OF MOUNTAINS AND CAMPUS FROM RIGHT 
OF PALMER HALL ENTRANCE 



SCHOOLS OF 

ARTS AND SCIENCES, LETTERS AND FINE ARTS 
THE NATURAL SCIENCES, THE SOCIAL SCIENCES 

A sound education at Colorado College amid beautiful and healthful surroundings pre- 
pares the graduate to secure the greatest benefits from life, not alone in technical re- 
quirements of a degree, but in society, recreation, athletics, religion and capable appre- 
ciation of everything worthwhile. 



C. B. HERSHEY, A. M., ED. D., ACTING-PRESIDENT 




Proclamation 

WHEREAS: We all need a rest; 

WHEREAS: Turkey always tastes 
better in the home town; 

AND WHEREAS: Tradition should 
not be lightly cast aside: 

THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED: 
That the period from 5 p. m. 
Wed., Nov. 29 to 8 a. m. Mon., 
Dec. 4 be celebrated as the 
THANKSGIVING RECESS with 
ceremonies appropriate to the 
occasion. 



LINOLEUM BLOCK BY ELIZABETH DEWING 



Lwued each week during the academic year. Entered at the >ost Office at Colorado Springg a» Second Clan Mattei7 



THE TIGER 



Friday, December 1, 193: 



iii 



S 



Jfrc6 

POT — 
SPIGOT 

No Cover Charge 



15 



* — 



* 



The best way to tell of the 
beauty of Colorado, Stand- 
ley's Color Pictures, Hand- 
Colored — 35 cents up. 

H.L.Standley 

PHOTOGRAPHER 

224 No. Tejon St. 

Colorado Springs 



— * 



Quality "Master" Cleaners 

Only one Quality and the 
Price is uniform 

Min 1-8-1-1 10 E.Kiowa 

H. A. Thompson 



A TIP FOR STUDENTS 

Students who are able to review 
complete notes are much better 
prepared for examinations. With 
ABC Shorthand, which is quickly 
learned in 12 easy lessons, you can 
take lecture and reading notes ver- 
batim. Complete course now sells 
for $1.00 at 

Pikes Peak Book & Stationery Co. 



$1.00 A Week 

Buys a new standard 
Typewriter 

New Portables: 

$14.95 
$29.50 
$34.50 
$45.00 
$60.00 



The 
Typewriter 

Man 




j 125 N. Tejon 

mtmttttur mtmm 



M. 95 




Xou sa// 
QJiesierfieMs are 
not like other 
cigarettes 




CIGARETTES may look alike; 
but that doesn't mean that 
they are alike. 

Chesterfield Cigarettes are not 
like other cigarettes. The tobac- 
co is mild, ripe — not like the to- 
bacco used in other cigarettes. 

Then again, Chesterfields are 
seasoned with the right kind 
of Turkish Tobacco. There 
is nothing flat or tasteless 
about them. 



a 




the cigarette that's MILDER 

the cigarette that TASTES BETTEl 



<c) 1933, Liggett & Myers Tobacco Co. 



BISSEL'S PHARMACY 

HENRY E. COPELAND, Prop. 

A Tiger Booster 

| Tel. M. 980 Comer Dale and Weber 

PROMPT DELIVERY 



Strach 



lan's 

SWEET SHOP 

Bijou and Nevada 



IRA C. DUGAN 

Jeweler and Optometriit 

Fine Watch and Clock Repairinj 

Eyes Examined — Glasses Fitted 

— Lenses Duplicated — 

Phone Main 1702-J 9 N. Tejon S 



VOLUME XXXVI 



THE TIGER 



COLORADO COLLEGE WEEKLY NEWS-MAGAZINE 



Number 11 



♦ e A M P u 



♦ PROFESSORS 

Science 

in all it's fields from tadpoles to 
the NRA will be discussed at the 
seventh annual meeting of the Col- 
orado-Wyoming Academy of Sci- 
.ence to be held in Laramie, Wyo. 
December 1 and 2. 




DR. RALPH J. GILMORE 

. . . now the spadefoot toad . . ". 

Convening on the University 
of Wyoming campus, the Academy 
will meet in sections to hear papers 
read by various members. COLO- 
RAO COLLEGE and Colorado 
Springs scientists are registered to 
deliver the following contributions: 

Dr. Paul E. Boucher, "The Effect 
of Repeated Intensification Using 
the Chromium Process." 

Dr. W. L. Abbott, "Changes in 
Industry Under the NRA." 

Dr. R. J. Gilmore, "The Tadpole 
of the Spadefoot Toad". 

Dr. W. F. Drea, of the Colorado 
Foundation for Research in Tuber- 
culosis, "The Effects of Daily Ir- 
radiation with X-rays of Bacteria 
for a Long Period of Time". 

Willet R. Willis, Colorado 
Springs High School, "The Source 
of Flourine in Some Water Sup- 
plies". 

Jacob Roeser, Jr., U. S. D. A., 
Growth in the Engleman Spruce 
Type in Central Colorado on Good 
Sites of Granite Formations". 

Dr. R. E. Landon, formerly as- 
sociated with COLORADO COL- 
LEGE, now of Fairplay, "Observa- 
tions on Quartzite Gold Deposits at 
Alma, Colorado". 

Dr. R. J. Gilmore is secretary of 
the Academy and Dr. F. W. Doug- 
las is chairman of the chemistry 
section. Both are members of the 
COLORADO COLLEGE faculty. 



Century Chest 

"To bring to citizens of 2001 a 
complete picture of the city at the 
present" is the purpose of the Cen- 
tury Chest to be found in Palmer 
hall museum. It was sealed by Col- 
orado Springs citizens Aug. 4, 
1901, at an impressive ceremony in 
Perkins hall. 

Contained in the chest are 60 
letters written by prominent citi- 
zens, on bond paper with India ink 
and pieced in cloth-lined envelopes, 
unfolded. With each letter is a pic- 
ture of the writer. Besides the let- 
ters there are over 100 photos of 
general views of the city, public 
and private buildings, street cars, 
autos, bicycles — all printed on plat- 
inum paper. Newspapers, director- 
ies and illustrated publications best 
illustrating local conditions at the 
beginning of the century are in the 
chest. Citizens were invited to en- 
close personal letters to relatives 
who might be living then — many 
took advantage of the offer. 

Stress was placed on local sur- 
roundings rather than national fea- 
tures. It was thought that informa- 
tion on the Colorado Springs region 
would be of greater interest to the 
local citizens in 2001. 

Care was taken to insure preser- 
vation of the records as one-sixth 
of an inch of lead line space around 
the documents. The chest itself is of 
plate steel, three-sixteenths of an 
inch thick: it is 20 inches long, 15 
inches wide and 30 inches high. 
Two hundred rivets were used to 
seal the 200 pound box. The cost 
of the chest, pictures and other ma- 
terial in it was listed at $1 16.25. 

The Century chest was originally 
olanned to be set in the wall of Co- 
burn library, but for some reason 
it was placed in the museum. 



Election 

New officers were elected by the 
Kappa Kappa Gamma chapter on 
Monday night, November 27. The 
officers, who will be formally instal- 
led on Dec. 4, are: President, Em- 
I ma Louise Jordan; Recording Sec- 
j retary, Kay Lingham; Correspond- 
ing Secretary, Margaret Stewart; 
Treasurer, Betty Foster; Registrar, 
Jim Browder; Assistant Registrar, 
Julia Dunham; Marshall, Frances 
Lewis; Pledge Trainer, Harriet En- 
gel. 




Emma Louise Jordan 
"Officers .... 

Among other activities, 'Prexy' 
Jordan belongs to the Colorado 
Springs Junior League, is Editor of 
the 1934 Nugget, assistant press 
agent for Koshare, former social 
chairman of A. W. S. In her spare 
time, she manages to keep up a 90 
average. 



James Waldie, COLORADO 
COLLEGE alumnus now teaching 
physics in the College of the City 
of New York, visited the physics 
laboratory last week. 



Saving People's Lives 

is one of the many varied tasks 
that the modern druggist is called 
upon to perform, according to A. 
L. Johnson of the Johnson-English 
Drug Company, who talked on 
"Merchandising of a Drug Store" 
in Cossitt commons at a recent 
meeting sponsored by Alpha Kap- 
pa Psi, business fraternity. 

Mr. Johnson said that with, the 
varied demands the modern drug 
store is continually confronted, the 
merchandising of the store is a 
difficult task equal only to the 
adapt ability required of the durg 
store attendant. 



Poetic 

unintelligibility as a characteris- 
tic of modern poetry is a truth not 
to be doubted by anyone who 
heard the lecture of Max Eastman 
Saturday night in Perkins hall. In 
fact, the reserve in some of t h e 
poems used by Mr. Eastman to il- 
lustrate his point was so great that 
they became to the hearer little 
more than nonsense verse. 

This cult of obscurity proves that 
literature in its recent tendencies 
tends to flee or react from the in- 
roads of science. The poet has left 
the field of truth to the scientist 
and confines himself to experience. 
In this process he has withdrawn 
into himself so that he transmits 
nothing of his emotion to his 
reader. 



♦ DRAMA 

Children Of The Moon 

featuring a small but select cast, 
sets by Robert (R. U. R.) Slate, 
ultramodernistic background, and 
the finished action of veteran per- 
formers awaits the approval of Ko- 
share patrons at the two-nite per- 
formance, Tuesday and Wednes- 
day, Dec. 5 and 6. 

Romance, thrills, and melodrama 
combine to give "Children of the 
Moon" attraction-plus for those 
who have seen Koshare of COLO- 
RADO COLLEGE rise to the 
heights in the past four years. In 
comparison with former productions 
of merit, "Children of the Moon" 
is a fit companion for "Lightnin," 
"Black Flamingo," "Remote Con- 
trol," and "R. U. R." 

With this production, the aim of 
a year's standing is realized by Di- 
rector Arthur G. Sharp, Jr., who 
long has wished to bring the show 
to the Cogswell theatre. Director 
Sharp's usual stress upon standards 
of showmanship, plus this added 
incentive should alone place "Chil- 
dren of the Moon" in a class by 
itself. 

The cast: 

George Atherton ....Gordon Parker 

Madam Atherton Lyda Roark 

Laura Atherton 

.....Louise Kirkpatrick 

Dr. Wetherell Fred Handke 

Major John Bannister 

Walter Wrye, Jr. 

Walter Higgs Joe Rustin 

Thomas Freeland Carde 



Busy Man 

School assemblies at Limon and 
Arriba heard William D. Copeland, 
secretary of COLORADO COL- 
LEGE, Tuesday morning. Mr. 
Copeland is in wide demand as a 
speaker at school assemblies in 
various sections of the state. He 
is high school visitor from COLO- 
RAO COLLEGE and in the next 
week he will pay visits to Alamosa, 
Denver and Arkansas Valley 
schools. 



More, More Wedding Bells 

Mary Lewis, Gamma Phi Beta, 
hefty member from this year's sen- 
ior class, to Clark Schnurr, Sigma 
Chi, COLORADO COLLEGE, '33, 
at Hotel Cosmopolitan, Denver, last 
Friday. Alice Rhoades. Gamma 
Phi sister, was bridesmaid. 

William Holcomb, also Sigma 
Chi and junior this year, to Doro- 
thy Irene Smith, formerly of Sterl- 
ing and graduate of BethEl hospi- 
tal, at Idaho Springs last June 7. 

Sophie Crowe, also Gamma Phi 
Beta and graduate last year, to 
Ormand Cox, local truck line own- 
er and Phi Delt here in the year 
1930-31. at Raton, N. M., last 
September 1 . 



THE TIGER 



Friday, December 1, 1933 



BXCBHAN^B 



Simile 

As sad as a School of Business 
graduate. 

Political Note 

I guess the Governor of North 
Carolina will still say to the Gov- 
ernor o f South Carolina, "It's a 
long time between drinks." 

— Utah Chronicle. 

Harvard men who desire em- 
ployment are enrolled on the so- 
cial register whose business it is to 
furnish male escorts for "deb" par- 
ties. Besides making a tidy sum 
each night, the men get to go to 
all the swanky parties in Newport 
and Gotham. 

A prominent fraternity at Bald- 
win-Wallace college is being sued 
by a family whose home is next 
to the chapter house because the 
members sing too loudly in the 
shower. 

Now we know why we have Al- 
pha and Upperclass assemblies. At 
Amberst, when chapel has been 
dismissed, the freshmen must rise 
from their seats and remain stand- 
ing until the three upper classes 
have passed out. 



Inasmuch as a great many mar- 
riages at the University of Utah 
have resulted from t h e fact that 
men and women study in proximity 
at the library, the president of the 
university has ruled that one-half 
of the library must be used by the 
men while the other half is restrict- 
ed to women only. 

Stay way from the Monroe 
parking lot, copper. The Pennsyl- 
vania state highway patrol recent- 
ly confiscated 25 cars owned by 
students of Lehigh university and 
classed them as "relics unfit to 
operate on the street." 

Excuses for oversleeping and 
missing 8 o'clocks are over for the 
Ohio university. Band members 
will play reveille from the library 
steps to arouse late sleepers. How 
about at the end of each lecture, 
too. * 

••- <•» ••• 

The names of all professors who 
keep their classes overtime are 
published regularly at the Univer- 
sity of Kansas. 

An enterprising Yale journalist 
is contemplating printing a hitch- 
hikers' guide for the benefit of the 
sons of Elihu who bum their way to 
New York week-ends. 

— Los Angeles Junior Collegian. 
••••••••• 

Have you heard about the Mae 
West stock? Well, it s«ems that it 



I was very low, but think now that 
it's going to come up sometime. 

*• ••• ••• 

The height of intoxication, so we 
are told, was the drunk who was 
found going around the corner 
lamp post complaining that he was 
walled in. 

— Clippings. 

■•• «•• ••« 
Have you got any money? I've 
got a little so let's go out. Such a 
conversation is now very popular 
at Chadron College. Recently at 
that school a 50-50 club was start- 
ed. It is the purpose of this club 
to make the girls pay for their 
share of the date. Strange as it 
may seem, the plan is working very 
effectively. 

— •— •»• 
Over at the University of Buff- 
alo they are running a free em- 
ployment service for students. This 
service is made possible through 
the co-operation of the personnel 
department and the student publi- 
cation, The Bee. In a recent issue 
the paper listed 20 jobs as avail- 
able to students. No wonder peo- 
ple shuffle off to Buffalo. 

«■ ■#■ *. 

Gettysburg College, starting it's 
102nd term this year, is without a 
co-ed on the campus for the first 
time in 45 years. 

If enough men show interest in 
cooking, a course in t h e culinary 
art will be arranged, apart from the 
women, at Miami University. 

— Doane Owl. 
••••+■ ••• 

They've fot the right idea in 
Canada. Here's an ad from the 
paper of the University of British 
Columbia. 

"WANTED — Freshette with car 
to take male junior to frosh re- 
ception." 

We often hear of things going 
from the sublime to the ridiculous 
and vice versa but the height of 
something or other is the report 
that a church now occupies the site 
of a well known fraternity house 
at U. S. C. 

••••••♦ 

Oh they wear their breeches in 

their boots out West — 
Their jewelry is the kind that shoots 
out West — 

— and so the Cheyenne school 
at Colorado Springs has abolished 
football and bucking horses and 
wild steers are to take their places 
as the college sport. 
■•• «•• ••• 

A new way to beat the six-week 
exams. Students at the University 
of Berlin are allowed six weeks to 
analyze and select their professors. 

The national collegiate pastime 



comes into its own. Loafing is to sor without either of their 

be the subject of a new course at [ ing the fact. 

Butler university. ♦ ♦ ♦ 

**■ "•■ * Tis rumored that becaul 

This may be the reason for that vard has banned Yale loci 
perenial Alpha on our campus . . . will retaliate by doing aw* 



A Georgia Tech student unneces- 
sarily repeated a course in the 
same room under the same profes- 



all the Harvard classics. 
«••■•«■■ 

According to the Arizonl 




OF HIVE TURKIJ 




ALWAYS thejinest tobaccos 

Always thejitfa 



Friday, December 1, 1933 



THE TIGER 



3 



ju can't start farming un- 
have a thousand dollars, 
you have a thousand dol- 
aiiit's the use of farming?" 



t good old days at the Uni- 

)f West Virginia a bell was 

yery night at 9 o'clock, 

students that they must 



retire. At 6 a. m. a cannon was at 

the armory to get them out of bed. 
••• ••* .«. 

And the early days of Harvard 
students brought their own cutlery 
to the dining hall, and the custom 
was to stick the knife and fork un- 
der the table, to hang until the 
next meal. 



Romance ends at Wheaton, at 
least as far as sorority parlors are 
concerned. The co-eds have pro- 
posed that each sorority balance 
its budget by installing a system 
of lounging fees for the more reg- 
ular gentlemen callers. 

— Los Angeles Junior Collegian. 






tmer 



OBACCOS 




Copyright. 1933, The American Tobacco Company. 



inshib 

LWATS luckies please/ 




why Luckies taste 
better, smoother 

On certain mountains in the Near East is a 
limited collar of earth — called in Turkish, 
Yacca." Tobaccos grown there cost as 
high as $1.00 a pound. Carefully they are 
examined, leaf by leaf. Often it takes a 
man a whole day to select two pounds of 
certain of these fine tobaccos. Lucky Strike 
is the world's biggest user of fine Turkish 
tobaccos. For these tender, delicate Turkish 
leaves are blended with choice tobaccos 
from our own Southland — to make your 
Lucky Strike a cigarette that is fully packed 
— round and firm — free from loose ends. 
That's why Luckies taste better, smoother. 



it's toasted 

FOR THROAT PROTECTION -FOR BETTER TASTE 



KEYHOLE 
EEPER 



Thumbnail drama: In the library 
early yesterday morning a person- 
able young freshman girl, pledged 
to one of the better known soror- 
ities, came up to an intently study- 
ing upperclassman and asked him 
for a cigarette. Upperclassman 
willingly offered the cigarette but 
i thought it a bit peculiar as he had 
never seen the girl smoke. Denou- 
ment: Two prominent active 
members of the pledge's lodge went 
grinning happily out the library 
door clutching one cigarette be- 
tween them. 



In spite of the general trek to 
the Aggie game and Denver's 
Broadmoor and Cosmo over the 
weekend, several went dancing out 
at the Broadmoor Nite club Satur- 
day night. Noticed were Natalie 
Wittichen, Martha Frances Howell, 
Hester Butcher and Wilton Cogs- 
well, Mary Hoag, Ruth Forbush, 
Ann Daniels and an attractive 
young couple who turned out to be 
her parents, Melba Mohler and 
Eva Cass (nee Adams and Lamar 
respectively) . 



Lurid national kidnappings and 
blackmail cases seem to have vis- 
ited our own secluded nook. Sat- 
urday night two local boys of high 
school age attempting to blackmail 
one of the local bootleggers, were 
caught by cops at Shove chapel's 
west entrance. The arrangements 
were for the bootlegger to leave 
the money at the chapel door and 
the boys would pick it up. Instead, 
cops cooperated, used the old dum- 
my trick, jumped out of the bush- 
es and shoved shotguns into the 
super-frightened boys. So after a 
night of notoriety, Shove chapel 
sank back into its usual calm. 



The word for Muriel McClana- 
han last week should have been 

shyish- — not syish 

••• ••• ••• 

Alfred Heinicke has such an un- 
blinking stare Helen Haney 

has rather starey blue eyes, too . 
. . . . Jane Walker swishing around 
the library in what must be silk 

petticoats or something a 

name I wonder if the owner re- 
sembles — Elvira Cortellini 

in the excitement of our one au- 
thentic touchdown at the Aggie 
game. Bertha Maxeiner threw her 
arms around the boy, a compara- 
tive stranger, sitting in front of her 
and screamed "Oh kiss me!" 



THE TIGER 



Friday, December 1, 1933 



THE TIGER 




Editor LEW CROSBY 

Business Manager E. F. STAPLETON 

KDITORIAL STAFF 

Editors: Managing Editor, Bob Johnson; Campus Editor, Joseph Lowe; 
Si-.rts Editors, Harold Marlowe, John Bicknell ; Society Editor, Alice Her- 

; Makeup Editor, Martin Legere; Pictorial Editor, David Dentan ; Ex- 
change Editor. John Dickey; News Editors. Miller Stroup, E<lith Weaver, 
Bwan, Albert Stubblefield, Fritz Baker; A. W. S., Ernestine Stroup: 
w. A. A., Loole Marie Mason. 

Society stitr Luzilla Eubank. Mildred Fritchle. Muriel McClanahan. 

Sarah Melntyre, Caroline Morrison, Lyda Roark, Sally Tompkins, Jane 
Walker, [mogene young. Makeup stall' Edith Gaylord. Exchange stafT 
Charles Macdonald. Snorts stafT Ronald Rolph. James Rjinsom, Dick Al- 
son. David Waters. Proof readers Lucy Blackman, Frances Stevenson. 

News stair Jake Johnson, David Dentan. Gilbert Baylis, Alice Sutton. La- 
l: i. Wiley, Nanet Meredith, Claire Sweeny, Elvira Cortellini, Ruth Mary 
\\ ,l.-t > r. Esther Alexander, Charles 'Dewing, Ken Hall, Jennie Conway. 
Mark Schreiher, Marybel I'oer. Ruth Liverman. Margaret Stewart. Ann 
Daniels, Conrad Brown, Dale Aahbangh, Frank Johnson, Jean James, Doro- 
thy Elston. Helen Miller. Ellen Perry. Susan Braerton. Dick Hall, Emma 
Louise Jordan. Virginia Bot-ford. Roberta McKay. 



Twanging away 

on his banjo for eight years with 
Johnny Metzler's Broadmoor Hotel 
orchestra, Wilbur "Bill" Jencks, 
COLORADO COLLEGE junior and 
versatile musician, is one of the 
band's most reliable and talented 
members. 




e> Individuality 

should be one of the marked qualities of the modern college group. 
Thus, it is neither fitting to, nor a good advertisement of COLORADO 
COLLEGE to retain as our almost-wholly used pep song the melody and 
much of the lyric taken from another institution. We realize that this 
song has been good enough for our predecessors, and that many in the 
present will immediately take up the cry of "sacrilege" to the old in- 
stitution. We have no wish to abolish such an outstanding tradition, 
but COLORADO COLLEGE students have enough original talent to 
compose a pep song which would match the rhythm of "Washington and 
Lee Swing," and, what is better, would offer us a pep song entirely our 
own in addition to "Colorado C Men." The suggestion has been made 
that new yells also be included in the change, which procedure, if for 
no other end in view, might infuse our lagging support and enthusiasm 
in athletics with new vigor. We offer the editorial services of the 
TIGER and the utmost cooperation of this office to the organizations 
having interest enough in COLORADO COLLEGE enthusiasm to work 
toward these ends. 



Wilbur Jencks 

" . . . . banjoing Beta." 
"Fellows, it's this way," is one 
of his most often used expressions 
and he has quite a reputation 
around the Beta house — the frater- 
nity that claims him as a member — 
as a punster. 

Jencks is coach of the pink and 
blue cage quintet, one of the promi- 
nent teams of the interfraternity 
league, and successfully combines 
his basketball prowess with banjo- 
banging. 



+ A Hand 

to the bruised and battered men who, through sheer indomitable 
spirit, carried the Orange and Black through a season beset with some 
of the most disastrous set-backs due to physical injuries ever encoun- 
tered by a football eleven. And to "Bully" Van de Graaff who, having 
seen half his regular team out of the lineup for the greater part of the 
season, wes able to infuse the club with a determination to carry on 
that best of battles, the losing fight. A man or group of men having 
the will to win in the face of a dismal future have the makings of char- 
acter which, given even breaks, CAN NOT LOSE. 



The White Triangle 

of Delta Alpha Phi is being worn 
by Willis Deits, Gerald Howard, 
and Jack Middle, all of Colorado 
Springs. The three men were pledg- 
ed last week. 



Girls Wbo 

wore trousers on the stage back 
in 1909 were quite scarlet, so 
Lloyd Shaw then freshman class 
president and Carl Blackman, both 
COLORADO COLLEGE, '13, who 
played the feminine leads in t h e 
first annual Pan-Pan appeared in 
floppy black bloomers and cotton i 
stockings, and brought down the 
house. 

A far cry from that first Pan- 
Pan show when anyone that want- 
ed to could put on an act, this 
vear's Magna Pan-Pan takes place 
December 1 1 with all campus fra- 1 
ternities and sororities making 
elaborate plans for it. With a min- 
strel show and chorus girl act, Phi 
Gamma Delta won the cup last 

j year- 

One chilly December morning in 

1909, Shaw brothers, Lloyd and I 
Glenn, then TIGER editor-in-chief. 
'10, were walking on Mesa road 
discussing ways of having an all- 
college celebration where athletes 
would not be the heroes, when 
brother Glenn was inspired with 
what turned out to be Magna Pan- 
Pan. 

A tremendous success, the first 
show was unlimited as to exhibitors 
and it was not until the third an- 
nual Pan-Pan in 1911 that it was 
dominated by fraternities. Out- 
standing; in that 1909 performance 
was "The Butcher Bird, by Hor- 
ace Heterlink", acted by the black 
bloomer duo. 



All-Conference 



Tomorrow Morning 

Shove chapel will be the scene 
of the third annual all-city Thanks- 
giving Day service sponsored by 
Colorado Springs Ministerial Alli- 
ance. Rev. John H. Skeen of First 
Baptist church will deliver the ser- 
mon and a combined chorus di- 
rected by Theo Fenlon, from all 
junior high schools of the city will 
sing. 

Dr. James G. McMurtry will read 
the Scripture, Dr. Wallace Carver 
will offer a prayer, and Dr. Walter 
G. Schaefer open the service with 
a reading of the President's procla- 
mation and pronounces the bene- 
diction at the closing. 

Originating with Mr. Eugene P. 
Shove, the ide^ of all city churches 
uniting for Thanksgiving service 
^ns been signallv successful. The 
Thanksgiving offering will go to 
the Community Chest. 



NOTICE 

All men planning to compete in 
the intramural wrestling meet are 
requested to meet in the "C" club 
room in Cossitt hall Monday, Dec. 
4, at 4 o'clock. The intramural 
wrestling meet will be held Dec. 12 
and 13, at 8 o'clock. 

Because the meet with Colorado 
university is scheduled for Jan. 20 
and additional time is needed for 
training, the intramural meet has 
been moved up. 

H. E. Waite, coach. 



Choosing the all-conference team from reports sent in by sports 
editors of all college papers in the Rocky Mountain league, this mythical 
aggregation is the consensus of sports writers' opinion. 

Tiger center and co-captain Swede Roark, receiving honorable 
mention, was the only C. C. player awarded notice. 






RMIPA ALL-CONFERENCE HONOR TEAM 



Three Years Ago 

the students of COLORADO 
COLLEGE were entertained with a 
Christmas program given by the 
student.s of the Colorado School for 
the Deaf and Blind. This popular 
group has been asked by the Assoc- 
iated Women students to appear 
again in an assembly before the 
Christmas holidays. 



FIRST TEAM 
Player, School, 
Davies, '(c) Utah 
Morris. C. A. C. 
Law, U. A. C. 
McLean, C. U. 
Murphy, C. U. 
Barton, Denver 
Carlson, Denver 
Fry, U. A. C. 
White, C. A. C. 
Wilson, B. Y. U. 
Richins, Utah 



Pts. 

16... 
14... 
12... 
8... 
12... 



Position 

. End . 

. End.. 

Tackle 

Tackle 

Guard 



Pts. 

5 

5 

7 

6 

7 



1. Player. 

.. DlXuvJI 

McGuire> 



SECOND TEAM 

School, PI 

U. A. C, 

Denver, Mi 

Denver, Epting 

Utah, Ostler 

Utah, Croft 

Utah, Savich 

U. A. C, Ward 

C. U., Grosvenor 

Utah, Kramer 

C. U., Counter 



8 Guard 7 

12 Center 8 

10... Quarterback 5 

16 Halfback 6 

14 Halfback 6 

13 Fullback 6C. A. C. (c) Damman 

HONORABLE MENTION 
Ends: 0. Epting. D.U. (3); Hull, U.A.C. (3); Clifton, C.T.C. 
(2); Carlston, Utah (2). 

Tackles: Roberts. D.U. (3); Drain. C.U. (3); Nisonger. B.Y.U 
(3) : Richardson. B.Y.U. (3) ; Griffiths, B.Y.U. (2) ; Fena, D.U. (2) ; 
Olson. C.T.C. (2); Murphv, C.T.C. (2). 

Guards: Caverra, D.U. (6); Ritchart, C.U. (3); McKenzie. Utah 
(2); Warner, B.Y.U. (2). 

Centers: Roark, C.C. (3): Brown. W.S.C. (2). 
Backs: Westphal. Utah (4); Merriman. C.T.C. (4); Jorgenson, 
D.U. (3) : Powers, D.U. (3) ; Magg. C.A.C. (3) ; Arnett. Utah (2) ; 
Jackson. D.U. (2); Rasmussen. U.A.C. (2); LaCombe. B.Y.U. (2); 
Parke. M.S.C. (2). 

(Points allotted on basis of 2 points for first team selection and 
one for second team choice.) 






THE TIGER 



Friday, December 1, 1933 



PHOTOGRAPHS 

The Gift that only you can give 
Official Photographer, C. C. Nugget 

PAYTON STUDIO 

30 S. Tejon Phone M. 477-J 



To Maintain 
A Payroll in 
Colorado Springs 




COAL/ 

Phone Main 577 



Thanksgiving Dance 




BROADMOOR NITE CLUB 

FRIDAY, DEC. 1, 9 P. M. 

Johnny Metzler's Orchestra 

Couples $1 Stags $.75 



Firestone* 
one stop 

SERVICE 



Let Us 
Prepare Your Car . 
for Winter Driving 



Complete Lubrication 

Motor Oils 

Batteries and Repairing 

Firestone Anti-freeze 

Prestone and Alcohol 



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Phone M. 202 



PORT 



TIGER HUDDLE 
^ Cryptic Criticism 

After witnessing the Tiger-Aggie 
game in Denver last week-end, we 
were quite satisfied with the brand 
of ball played by the Bengals, but 
wonder why they didn't resort to 
passes earlier in the game. Stan 
Ryerson was really heaving "the 
old pigskin" down the alley and — 
methinks the score would have been 
much closer if the aerial route had 
been chosen the first part of the 
game. 



^ Prognostications 

Our COLORADO COLLEGE Ti- 
gers have come out of their last 
"huddle" for their 1933 season and 
now that their suits have been safe- 
ly packed away in the usual amount 
of moth-balls, we gaze over the 
list of games this week-end and 
grab out a couple of forecasts for 
the feature games of the Turkey 
Day festivities. We pick Utah to 
hang it on the Colorado Aggies and 
Denver to upset the strong Boulder 
aggregation. 

Hence — crowning the Pioneer as 
the Rocky Mountain Conference 
gridiron king. 



^ Bon Voyage 

At the firing of the gun last Sat- 
urday in D. U. stadium, six COLO- 
RADO COLLEGE football players 
spelled "finis" to their college foot- 
ball careers. To these six men we 
wish good luck and bon Voyage; 
Harold Funk, Mack Reid, John Mi- 
halick, Swede Carlson, Swede Ro- 
ark, and Stan Ryerson. 

It was these men who carried 
the colors of the Black and Gold 
upon the field time after time and 
even though their percentage col- 
umn wasn't so high, the traditional 
Tiger fight was always in evidence. 

A Flare 

of the most intense rivalry in the 
Rocky Mountain Conference will 
furnish a fitting climax to the 1933 
football season when the Colorado 
University and Denver University 
football aggregations renew their 
ancient gridiron war-fare in Denver 
tomorrow. Given fair weather this 
game should provide the most col- 
orful spectacle of the season and 
smash all regional attendance rec- 
ords, for it will be of championship 
significance to Denver, who must 
win to be assured of the crown. The 
game will be of intense interest be- 
cause the best offense in the con- 
ference will clash with the best de- 
fensive line. Colorado is the leading 
scoring team in the conference, 
having piled up 144 points in six 
games, while Denver has a great 
defensive record. 



Way Outweighed 

The bell at Old Cutler didn't 
ring last Saturday night, not be- 
cause the Tigers were beaten by 
the Colorado Aggies, but because 
they were outweighed twelve 
pounds to the man, and no team 
can overcome such power as that 
possessed by the Aggies heavier 
squad. 

In the first quarter COLORADO 
COLLEGE played the much favor- 
ed Farmers to a standstill, their 
brilliant defense stopping the lat- 
ter, once on the six yard line and 
again on the thirteen where Reid 
recovered a fumbled pass, however 
in the following period, weakened 
by their previous heroic efforts two 
touchdowns were chalked up 
against the Tigers, Red White of 
the Aggies playing a wonderful 
game in the backfield. 

Refreshed and reinforced, t h e 
Aggies came back after the rest 
period to score another touchdown 
and an additional three points on 
a field goal by Dammann. In this 
quarter the Tigers just missed a 
chance to score on a long pass 
from Ryerson to Sutak which failed 
by inches. 

With the start of the final quar- 
ter, the Tigers opened up their bag 
of tricks. Passes from Ryerson to 
Williams and Roach, and a long 
end run by Funk, but the breaks 
were against the team and the play 
was called back from over the goal 
line. A few moments later with the 
Tigers in possession of the ball a 
54 yard pass from LeMaster to 
Ryerson placed the ball on Aggies 
five yard line, but again Lady Luck 
deserted the Tigers and the ball 
called back. Fighting back for the 
third time COLORADO COLLEGE 
put over its first and final touch- 
down on a long pass from Ryerson 
to LeMasters. Later the Aggies 
added another touchdown to their 
score making the final totals 30 for 
the Farmers to 7 for the Tigers. 

In spite of defeat the game 
brought out some brilliant play on 
the part of the Tiger aggregation. 
Ryerson's passes were superb. 
Reid and Roach consistently gained 
through exchange of punts, LeMas- 
ters and Williams were deadly re- 
ceiving passes, Funk ran the open 
field for excellent gains. And do 
not forget the defense either, pitted 
against men of far heavier weight, 
Roark at center, Mihalick and 
Carlson at guard, Andrews at tackle 
were in there every minute holding 
back that mighty machine from 
Fort Collins. 




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i 



Friday, December 1, 1933 



THE TIGER 



oeiAL 



SOCIAL CALENDAR 
Thursday, Nov. 30 — 

Kappa Sigma Breakfast Dance 
Friday, Dec. 1 — 

Kappa Kappa Gamma Dance 

Cardboard Footballs 

bearing the pictures of each foot- 
ball man were the placecards at the 
first annual banquet given by the 
Kappa Kappa Gamma chapter for 
the members of the football team, 
coaches, and managers. One of the 
high lights of the banquet was a 
rhymed toast to each member of 
the team, which was written and 
given by Virginia Berger. The fin- 
ishing touch was furnished by the 
pledge class which presented a u- 
nique musical version of "Hamlet." 

Carrie Co-ed's Letter 
Dear Sis, 

Well, I'm back from Boulder, 
Denver, the Aggie game, and the 
Cosmo — all in one piece! It was 
a large-sized week-end, with every- 
body celebrating something or oth- 
er. You probably read about the 
game in the paper, so I'll just skip 
over that. But I always do get a 
jolt out of watching a football game 
in an up-town stadium, and seeing 
all the people, and what they have 
on, and who they come with. 

A bunch of us started the week- 
end early by driving up to Boulder 
collitch on Friday night for the Phi 
Delt dance, where everybody seem- 
ed to be celebrating the repeal of 
the controversial amendment. After 
the dance, we gals spent the night 
at ye olde sororite house, having 
much fun seeing all the sisters. 

On Saturday night, everyone 
headed for the Silver Glade, where 
we had the privilege of gazing on 
the mighty heroes of the Aggie 
team. They may be football heroes 
to some people, but we'll hold out 
for the good ole Tiger men. They 
may not win every game. But we 
like 'em! 

I'll be home soon, so save me 
some turkey. And it won't be long 
before I'll be home for Christmas. 
All I have to do before that is to 
write about umpteen term papers, 
and study for a few exams. Will I 
be glad to get home and get some 
good ole rest. 

Your collegiate sister, 
Carrie. 



Chapel Calendar 

Thursday, Nov. 30, 10:00 A.M. 
Community Thanksgiving service 
in Shove chapel. Ministerial al- 
liance in charge. Sermon by Dr. 
John Skeen. Music by the Jun- 
ior high schools' chorus. 

Tuesday, Dec. 5, 10:00 a. m. 
Chapel service. Speaker: Acting 
President, Dr. C. B. Hershey. 

Wednesday, Dec. 8, 5: 15 p. m. 
Organ Recital. Dr. Frederick 
Boothroyd. 

The public is invited. 



Shower 

Linens, dishes, and everything 
nice for the kitchen were presented 
to Mrs. Ormand Cox, nee Sophia 
Crowe, at a supper at the Gamma 
Phi Beta house on Monday eve- 
ning, Nov. 27. After showering 
gifts upon the bride, the girls sang 
several Gamma Phi songs to her. 



THE WAY WE FINISHED 



W. L. 

Colorado Aggies 5 

Denver University 5 

Utah University 4 I 

Colorado University 4 2 

Utah Aggies 4 3 

Brigham Young University 4 3 

Colorado Teachers 3 3 

Colorado College 2 4 

Montana State I 3 

Colorado Mines 1 5 

Wyoming University 1 5 

Western State 5 



111 

Tie 


Pet. 


bl/ 

Pts. 


O.P. 


1 


1.000 


78 


13 


1 


1.000 


81 


7 





.800 


109 


31 





.667 


144 


44 





.572 


115 


35 





.572 


75 


43 





.500 


68 


48 


1 


.333 


39 


119 





.250 


13 


126 





.166 


35 


142 


1 


.166 


19 


108 





.000 


13 


73 






Purple And White 

programs and lemon punch add- 
ed color to the Phi Gamma Delta 
dance that was given on Friday 
night, Nov. 24, at the chapter 
house. The chaperons for the par- 
ty were Prof, and Mrs. R. J. Gil- 
more. Dr. and Mrs. W. C. Service, 
Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Gray, Mr. and 
Mrs. Al Johnson. 



Round Robin Tea 

honoring all fraternity men o n 
the campus was given by Delta 
Gamma Friday afternoon, Nov. 
24. Members of Beta Theta Pi at- 
tended from 3 until 4 o'clock, the 
following hour given over to t h e 
entertainment of Kappa Sigma ana 
Phi Delta Theta, with Phi Gamma 
Delta and Sigma Chi honored 
guests from 5 until 6. Chaperons 
for the occasion were Mrs. William 
Service and Miss Maud Kinni- 
burgh. 



A Smoker 

in honor of their alumni was giv- 
en by the Kappa Sigma fraternity 
Sunday night. The pledges fur- 
nished the evening's entertainment 
by a series of athletic contests, 
which might better have been held 
on Washburn field, but which by 
virtue of flying fists and bodies af- 
forded the alumni other diversions 
than the routine of smoking ciga- 
rettes and chewing on cigars. 

After the smoke had thickened to 
a dark smudge, refreshments were 
served and gasping guests were 
given their leave until the next 
smoker, which is to be held after 
Christmas vacation. 



top of this page. 

As you probably are aware, the 
TIGER usually comes out every 
Friday and in order to send this 
week's issue through the mails, as 
it is published on Wednesday, the 
regular date must be kept. 

THEY LEAP FROM THE 
BOOK AND Zi\El . . .tarn 



in America's 
best loved 
romance/ 




CAMPUS CHIC 

Blonds are often lovely in black, 
for their color brings life to the so- 
phisticated dullnes. Mary Jean Mc- 
Donald wears it beautifully. Her 
tiny formal hat is adorable — a 
cou net with a black velvet band, 
the net is so delicate that her hair 
shows through. Her dress is satin — 
slender and graceful with sleeves in 
three large tiers lined with pearl 
white satin. With it she wears pearl 
ear-rings and a gorgeous rhinestone 
bracelet. She always wears the new 
and different. At the Aggie game 
she looked lovely in her light tan 
caracul coat, accented with a dash- 
ing red hat and scarf to match. A 
true exponent of the latest campus 
chic! 



Colored Balloons 

Little cupids were given a ride 
on colored balloons at the Delta 
Alpha Phi tea dance on Friday 
afternoon, Nov. 24, to announce 
the engagement of Miss Marion 
Hartwell to Mr. Lee Crowell, ex 
'36 Ter*. cookies, and dancing to 
Carl Puffer's syncopations enter- 
tained the guests from 4 until 5 
o'clock. Mrs. C. B. Hershey and 
Mrs. J. H. Miles chaperoned t h e 
dance. 



Although 

you may think this is November 
29, this is really December 1 as 
you will see if you look up at the 





ONLY 

GREAT 

PICTURES! 



STARTS 
TOMORROW 



Friday, December 1, 1933 



THE TIGER 



p' "INN" 

ACROSS FROM MURRAY'S 



9 



CLOSING OUT ! 

PARKER PENS- PENCILS 

at 25% Discount. 

Most numbers unconditionally 

guaranteed. 

Everything in Class Room Needs 

The DEMOCRAT 



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;wnc: 

ELECTRIC CO. 

Call Main 939, Rear 15 E. Bijou 



Give Photos for Xmas 

Call Main 3328-J today 
for appointment — 

WAGNER-FULTS 
STUDIO 

Burns Theatre Bldjg. 

Official Colorado College 

Photographer 

We carry a fine assortment of 
Hi Class frames. 





STARTS 

THANKSGIVING DAY 

For 3 Glorious Days 



And On The Screen 
CONSTANCE BENNETT 
IN 
"AFTER TONIGHT" • 



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College men everywhere 
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22 S. TEJON ST. 



Fuimbllt Clotiies for Men 



Snappy and Economical 



YOUR HABITS 

Some habits when 
formed, become either a 
great handicap, or a 
mighty Asset. 

Yours' are now in the 
forming; — Extrava- 
gance, arrogance and 
carelessness to details, are 
among the handicaps — 
Economy, utility, modesty 
and ambition, are among 
the assets — 

Our great Clothes at a 
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Top Coats 

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FURMBILT 

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Karl 0. Ha gland, Asst. 



THE TIGER 



Friday, December 1, 1933 



KOSHARE presents 

"€ 1 1 i I <l r <* 11 o/TheNoon 



Tuesday, December 5th 
Wednesday, December 6th 



COGSWELL THEATRE 
Bemis Hall 



General Admiission 50c 
Reserved Admission 75c 



Colorado College 

TEXT BOOKS 

AND SUPPLIES 

C. C. and Fraternity 

Stationery 

Laundry Bags — $2.00 Each 

Murray Drug Co. 

Across From the Campus 



lillllilllllHi 



Pack Bags 
Laundry Bags 
Hikers Supplies 

THE OUTWEST 

TENT and AWNING CO. 



I. 1261 



18 E. Kiowa 



Couture's 

FRENCH CLEANING & 
DYEING CO. 



We Solicit Your Patronage 



218 N. Tejon St. 

Colorado Springs, Colo. 

Phone Main 1288 



Howard's 

(^Barber 

9 Shop 
V_9 



19 East Bijou Street 






I 









COLORADO COLLEGE 




Palmer Hall entrance 



'IN STEP WITH THE MARCH OF TIME" 

Since 1874 outstanding among the 
highest ranking colleges of the 
country for its close super- 
vision of students, thor- 
oughness of training, and 

healthful location, 
COLORADO COLLEGE 
again steps for- 
ward in the a- 

doption of 
a New PLAN 

permitting 
greater freedom 
in choice of sub- 
jects under expert 
guidance to insure the 
best procedure in fields 
of concentration. A LIBERAL 
ARTS COLLEGE, C. C. offers com- 
plete foundational courses for 
advanced study. For catalog write 

William D. Copeland, Secretary, 

Colorado College, 

Colorado Springs, Colorado. 






Palmer Hall portico 



C. B. HERSHEY, A. M., ED. D., Acting President 






CAPTAIN ROACH 

"The Iron Man" 



VICE-CAPTAIN ANDREWS 

"Burley Steve" 



At the closing of the past 1933 COLORADO COLLEGE gridiron 
season and with the passing out of the picture of Co-Captains Roark 
and Mihalick the 1934 football squad cast ballot for captains who will 
lead the Black and Gold on the field next fall. As a result of these 
ballots, Clanton Roach was elected captain over Steve Andrews, who 
will act as vice-captain. 

Both men have played varsity ball for the past two years and are 
expected to reach their prime on the greensward ere pigskin time arrives 
next fall. It was on Captain Roach's shoulders that the. responsibility 
of quarterback fell during the past season, and because of his accu- 
rate kicking and blocking, the members of the Tiger eleven had the 
confidence to elect him to the generalship of another fighting Tiger ag- 
gregation. During the past season Andrews has made a wonderful rec- 
ord due to his accuracy in place kicking. Only one other player in the 
Rocky Mountain Conference has placed the ball between the posts as 
often as Steve, and due to his deadly tackling he has been feared by 
other conference contenders. 

With these two capable leaders it seems certain that the '34 Tiger 
Football machine is destined to be a deadly rival in gridiron competi- 
tion next year. 



Issued each week during the academic year. Entered at the »ost Office at Colorado Springs as Second-Class Matter. 



THE TIGER 



Friday, December 8, 1933 



The best way to tell of the 
beauty of Colorado, Stand- 
ley's Color Pictures, Hand- 
Colored — 35 cents up. 

H.L. Standley 

PHOTOGRAPHER 

224 No. Tejon St. 

Colorado Springs 



fioward's 

(^Barber 
m Shop 



19 East Bijou Street 



Couture's 

FRENCH CLEANING & 
DYEING CO. 



We Solicit Your Patronage 



218 N. Tejon St. 

Colorado Springs, Colo. 

Phone Main 1288 



Pack Bags 
Laundry Bags 
Hikers Supplies 

THE OUTWEST 
TENT and AWNING CO. 



M. 1261 



18 E. Kiowa 



To Maintain 
A Payroll in 
Colorado Springs 




GOAL? 

Phone Main 577 




garettes 



IN ot so long ago practically all 
cigarettes were made by hand 






Now, Chesterfields are made by high-speed ma- 
chines that turn out 750 cigarettes a minute, and 
the cigarettes are practically not touched by hand. 







BY the use of long steel ovens 
— drying machines of the 
most modern type — and by age- 
ing the leaf tobacco for 30 months 
— like wine is aged — Chesterfield 
tobacco is milder and tastes better. 

Only pure cigarette paper — 
the best made — is used for Chest- 
erfield. 

Expert chemists test all mate- 
rials that are used in any way in 
the manufacture of Chesterfields. 

Chesterfields are made and 
packed in clean, up-to-date fac- 
tories, where the air is changed 
every 4K minutes. The mois- 
ture-proof package, wrapped in 
Du Pont's No. 300 Cellophane— 
the best made— reaches you just 
as if you went by the factory door. 



F 



(^hesteriield cigarettes are just 
as pure as trie water you drink 1 



(c) 193}, LlOOBTT & Myers Tobacco Co. 

BISSEL'S PHARMACY 

HENRY E. COPELAND, Prop. 

A Tiger Booster 

Trl. M. 980 Comer Dale and Weber 

PROMPT DELIVERY 



Strachan's 

SWEET SHOP 

Bijou and Nevada 



IRA C. DUGAN 

Jeweler and Optometrist 

Fine Watch and Clock Repairing 

Eyes Examined — Glasses Fitted 

— Lenses Duplicated — 

Phone Main 1702-J 9 N. Tejon St 



THE TIGER 



VOLUME XXXVI 



COLORADO COLLEGE WEEKLY NEWS-MAGAZINE 



Number 12 



♦ e A M P ti 



♦ DRAMA 

25 Years 

of tradition coupled with the 
age-old but ever-new story of the 
Christ child will again bring to the 
Cogswell theatre stage the perfor- 
mance of "Eager Heart" Sunday 
evening, Dec. 10, at 5 o'clock. 

This production is perhaps best 
loved and best known of all Ko- 
share presentations. It combines 
simplicity of action with the soft 
echoes of musical background and 
has the distinction of having 
played year after year to enthusi- 
astic theatre lovers, many of 
whom have seen the majority of 
the performances. 

Koshare of COLORADO COL- 
LEGE extends their traditional 
invitation for all who wish to at- 
tend "Eager Heart." 



Heads Academy. 

Dr, R. J. Gilmore of COLORA- 
DO COLLEGE was honored Satur- 
day at the annual convention of the 
Colorado-Wyoming Academy of 
Science by being elected president 
of the organization for the ensuing 
year. Two other faculty members 
were selected for posts. Dr. W. C. 
Service was chosen secretary and 
Prof. P. E. Boucher was placed on 
the executive committee. 

The convention was held at Lar- 
amie, Wyo., with 135 educators at- 
tending. One hundred eighteen pap- 
e r s on various subjects were read. 

Members from COLORAO COL- 
' EGE who attended included Dr. 
W. C. Service, Dr. R. J. Gilmore, 
Dr. William F. Drea, Dr. C. W. T. 
Penland. Dr. Paul E. Boucher, Dr. 

F.M. Doualas, Dr. E. C. Bramhall. 

Howard Olson, Arthur Roe and 

Charles Boidner. 



Shades of Patrick? 

Aitho the COLORAO COLLEGE 
student body does not bear evi- 
dence of containing a second Dis- 
raeli or Patrick Henry, according to 
the results from the debate tryouts 
held Monday; nevertheless, William 
. Copeland, debate coach, has high 
hopes of placing in the oratorical 
field a fast attacking team compos- 
ed of members from the last year's 
team aid those who were impress- 
ive in Monday tryouts. 

Due to request from numerous 
students who were unable to be 
present Monday, Mr. Copeland is 
holding another tryout Monday at 
4 o'clock in the pit at Palmer hall. 
The subiect for debate will be the 
same; "Resolved: That the powers 
of the president of the United 
States should be substantially in- 
creased as a settled policy." 

Those who are interested in the 
extemporaneous speaking contest 
are requested to be reading "Values 
of Education" for tryouts which 
will be announced later. 

Debaters who took part in Mon- 
day's tryouts are requested to meet 
Mondav at 5 o'clock in the pit, Pal- 
mer hall. 



Band ^ 

A tour of all the larger cities in 
the state by the COLORADO COL- 
' EGE band is being planned by 
Dean E. D. Hale and Drum-Major 
Harry Fontius. This trip will be 
taken sometime early in the second 
semester. Director Fred G. Fink 
plans to give a concert sometime 
before the trip. 



Recent Addition 

to Coburn Library is the "Amer- 
can Annual of Photography for 
1934" which is of special interest 
to COLORADO COLLEGE as it 
contains an article by Professor 
of Physics Paul E. Boucher, "The 
Control of Contrast by Varying 
Gamma, The Development Fac- 
tor." 



Wedding Bells Still 

ring as Francis Cuckow. COLO- 
RADO COLLEGE senior, Phi Delt, 
and three year member of the ten- 
nis squad, announces his marriage 
on August 30 to Elizabeth Earls, of 
Lamar, Colo., childhood sweetheart. 



Fifty Books 

Fifty books have been written 
by Dr. Archer B. Hulbert, COLO- 
RADO COLLEGE history professor, 
and more than that number of mag- 
azine articles written by him have 
been published it was revealed 
when he spoke to the Medieval and 
Modern history class Mondav on 
the vovage of Columbus and the 
activities of other geographers and 
explorers. The mans showed what 
some of the early ideas of the world 
were like. Cuba was identified as 
lanan, while Florida was believed 
to be the Korean peninsula and 
California was once thought to be 
an island off the coast of North 
America and close to Japan. 

Dr. Hulbert is an authority on 
American historv. specializing in 
western historv. Thirtv-nine of his 
books are in Coburn library. 



Greeks 

of two fraternities elected officers 
during the week. Kappa Sigma and 
Delta Alpha Phi fraternities elected- 
Other organizations will announce 
their choices later. 

Kappa Sigma selections are, 
president, Dwight Beery; vice- 
president, Kenneth Stannard; mas- 
ter of ceremonies, Gilbert Baylis; 
secretary, Albert Stubblefield; trea- 
surer, Gilbert Bernard. 

Delta Alpha Phi officers are, 
president, Miller Stroup; vice presi- 
dent, Sherburne Ayers; secretary, 
Paul Richert; treasurer, Wallace 
Peck. 



Incurs Injury 

Mrs. C. B. Hershey incurred a 
broken knee cap from a fall on 
ice Tuesday morning, and was tak- 
en to Glockner. She is expected 
to remain at the hospital for sev- 
eral weeks, according to doctors. 
She is permitted to see visitors. 

Getting Along Fine 

When asked how the COLORA- 
DO COLLEGE quartet is getting 
along this year, one of its mem- 
bers replied that it is "doing fine." 
Besides singing over KVOR every 
Wednesday night it now has enga- 
gements to sing at local theatres. 
It will sing Monday night for the 
D. A. R. meeting at the home of 
Mrs. James G. McMurtry. The 
quartet will also sing before the 
student body at the chapel hour 
Tuesday. 



Silver 

is present in milk produced in 
the Rocky Mountain region, ac- 
cording to a paper by Dr. William 

F. Drea of COLORADO COLLEGE, 

which was read at the meeting of 
the Colorado-Wyoming academy of 
Science held in Laramie, Wyo., 
Dec. 1 and 2. 

This discovery was made possi- 
ble bv the spectrum analysis of 
milk. Large quantities of the liquid 
were condensed until onlv a nowder 
remained and this was then burned 
to eliminate the vegetable matter. 
The ashes were then analvzd and 
the silver was found to be present. 
Since certain silver salts are solvent 
in water, these salts are supposed 
to h»e the source of the sib'er. 

Willet R. Willis of the Colorado 
Springs Hi<»h school was especially 
commended by members of the ac- 
ademy for his p^ner, "The Sources 
of Fluonne in Water". Prof. Gus- 
tavson of Denver offered a resolu- 
tion praising Mr. Willis and his 
work. 



♦ PAN PAN 

Traditions 

fell by the wayside Tuesday with 
the announcement by the managers 
of Magna Pan Pan that the yearly 
show would be postponed until af- 
ter the Christmas Holidays. Rea- 
sons for the deferrment arose from 
the fact that appointment of mana- 
gers at a late date left no time for 
an efficient production. The tenta- 
tive date set for the show is Mon- 
day, Jan. 8. 




DICK HALL 

"Traditions fall - - - 

Prof. Arthur G. Sharp, Jr., sug- 
gested a plan to the managers of 
the show whereby regular rehear- 
sals will be held during the week 
following Christmas vacation with 
stage presentations to fill in the gap 
between organizational acts. 




DAVE WATERS 

"Bigger and Better Show 

For the first time in history, 
three managers have been chosen 
for Pan Pan instead of the tradi- 
tional two. At a meeting of the 
student council Tuesday night Dick 
Hall, Dave Waters and Frank John- 
son were chosen. They will work 
in cooperation with Prof. Sharp in 
making 1934 Pan Pan a show 
which, for finish, should set a new 
record in entertainment. 



The managers request that a 
synopsis of acts and the time re- 
quired will be given Prof. Sharp 
by each organization before Tues- 
day night to be eligible for the 
competition. The strictest secrecy 
will be observed in regard to each 
individual act. 



THE TIGER 



Friday, December 8, 1933 



Golf, Blonds, 

and Guy Lombardo are favorites 
of diminutive Don Haney, blonde 
himself and one of the key men of 
Johnny Metzler's Broadmoor Hotel 
orchestra now playing every Sat- 
urday night at the Broadmoor Nite 
Club. 




DON HANEY 



"How'm 1 doin' 



Graduated from COLORADO 
COLLEGE last June, "Little Man" 
was a member of Phi Delta Theta, 
Koshare star, and the best cheer- 
leader here in recent years. 

Haney plays sax, fiddle, clarinet, 
all with equal dexterity and is one 
of the band's chief vocalists, his 
"Hnw'm I Doin'" with shut eyes 
and effects being one of the high 
spots of an evening's dance pro- 
gram. 



Green and Orange 

is a lovely combination, espec- 
ially when it is carried out in drap- 
es, pillows, ash travs and what 
have yon. The A. W. S. room in 
Palmer hall has had a complete 
overhauling, and if one will notice, 
it has not only been made attrac- 
tive, but also more comfortable. 
T^ ; s transformation was made pos- 
sible bv the Associated Women 
Students aided bv the senior women. 

Crf -lit poe« to Beverly Murphy 
and Victoria Kneip. 



NOTICES 

Intramural wrestling matches 
'"ill he held in Cossitt «rvmnasium 
T»i*«dav night at 7 and Wednesday 
nifht at 8. The preliminaries will 
h* held Tuesday and the finals the 
foll^winf nifht. There will be a 
Mnall admission charged. 

Notice 

The Associated Women student's 
legislative board will not meet ec. 
12. 



LECTURE NOTES 

Students who are able to review 
complete notes are much better 
prepared for examinations. With 
ABC Shorthand, which is quickly 
learned in 12 easy lessons, you can 
take lecture and reading notes ver- 
batim. Complete course now sells 
for $1.00 at 
Pikes Peak Book & Stationery Co. 



20 



IULLY PACK! I 



No Loose End 




At Ohio State university there is | n i-i i|M-,«i„.|||i|___ .. 

a 12th position on the team, that Quality Mastei Ueaiiers 

of "humorist". He must wear a uni- 0nly one Q ua i ity ^j tne 



Price is uniform 



form, sit on the bench at all games 
and wisecrack to keep the team 
from becoming nervous. Fifty can- (Main 1-8-1-1 Kiowa 



didates tried out for the job. 



H. A. Thompson 



The Gift that only you car«| 
iicial Photographer, C. C. «J 



Official 



PAYTON STUD 

30 S. Tejon Phone K 



Friday, December 8, 1933 



THE TIGER 




E SO MILD. SO SMOOTH 



'ay the 20 
I'ttellone 
is round, 
:h choice 
cos. And 

(4 



every Lucky is free from annoying 
loose ends. The tips are clean-cut — 
the tobacco doesn't spill out. That's 
why Luckies draw easily, burn evenly 
—and are always mild and smooth. 



it's toasted ' 

■ROTECTION— FOR BETTER TASTE 



ELECTRIC CO 



re: 



i 939, Rear 15 E. Bijou 



"INN" 

ACROSS FROM MURRAY'S 



PORT 



TIGER ROARS 
333% 

With a 333 percentage safely 
tucked away under their belts, the 
footballers have deserted the green- 
sward and taken up war-fare on the 
hardwood. Their first game played 
last Tuesday night with the crack 
D. A. C. team from Denver was a 
close and well played game. We are 
anticipating a 3 x 333% finish 
three months hence when the 1934 
Tiger five finish their cage season... 

.*. ••. .«. 
A New Regime 

Even Bully Van de Graff checked 
in his gridiron accessories and has 
taken the place of "Dutch" Clark 
former Tiger basketball mentor and 
each evening Bully calls out orders 
that can be heard echoing through- 
out the Tiger lair. Success to Bully 
and his two squads under a "new 
regime." 

Hell'o Babe! ' 

Babe Didrikson and her crack 
woman's professional basketball 
team will make their debut in the 
Springs Tuesday night when they 
match strides with an all star team 
from Colorado Springs headed by 
Mack Reid. Between halves of the 
game, Babe will put on an exhibi- 
tion consisting of track and field 
events which made her famous. 



Aroused Enthusiasm. 

Noticed improvement has been 
observed at the amount of interest 
manifested by students during the 
first round of the inter-fraternity 
basketball cage race. 

As a whole, the games were run 
off on a clean and well played bas- 
is. Play for • the second round 
championship will be resumed im- 
mediately after the holidays. 



D. A. C.-36, TIGERS -34 

The COLORADO COLLEGE Ti- 
gers threw a scare into the highly 
lauded Denver Athletic Club cag- 
ers Tuesday night when the Tigers 
staged a last quarter rally that just 
missed tying up the game when the 
final gun sounded with the D. A. C. 
winning 36-34. 

The Tigers displayed unusual 
strength for their first game of the 
season and several new men stood 
out which gave coaches Van de 
Graaff and Tuan Reid a much 
brighter outlook on the coming sea- 
son. Twelve men made, the Denver 
trip which included Captain Glid- 
^en. Rverson. Livin<*ton, Day.Ber°\ 
Rprda^d. Harter. Paterson. Hall. 
Pn'ce. Booth and Gnstavson. Ten of 
tnis souad were used in order to de- 
termine a smooth-running combina- 
tion. Even' man but one. a quard, 
contributed at least one basket to 
the Tiger score. 



Basketball 

This year, for the first time, Bully 
Van de Graaff will take over the 
job as head basketball coach. Bully 
has coached the football eleven for 
the past eight years and in his ca- 
pacity will take over full charge of 
both the A. and B. squads. 




BULLY VAN DE GRAAFF 
Head Cage Mentor 

Juan Reid, former Tiger Star 
will assist Bully and practically all 
instruction will be handed out by 
Reid. 




JUAN REID 
Assistant Basketball Coach 

The outlook for the 34 cage sea- 
son looks bright if the showing the 
Tigers made against the strong D. 
A. C. five is any evidence of a win- 
ning team. 



The interfraternity swimming 
meet will be held Saturday, Dec. 9, 
at 2 o'clock in the Broadmoor pool. 

Dr. Maklosteen 

of Persia was present at the 
Bemis dinner given Monday for 
faculty members while informal ad- 
dresses on "My Philosophy of Edu- 
cation were given by Dr. H. M. 
Corning, Colorado Springs superin- 
tendent of schools; Francis M. 
Froelicher, headmaster of Fountain 
Valley School for Boys: and Dr. 
Lloyd Shaw, superintendent of 
Cheyenne Mountain school. 

After dinner an open discussion 
was held and Mr. and Mrs. W. S. 
Roe and Mr. and Mrs. Roy Wasson 
were other guests. 



I 



THE TIGER 



Friday. 6 December 8, 1933 



THE TIGER 




Editor 



LEW CROSBY 



Business Manager E. F. STAPLETON 

EDITORIAL STAFF 

Editors: Managing Editor, Bob Johnson; Campus Editor, Joseph Lowe; 
S|v>rts Editors, Harold Marlowe, John Bicknell ; Society Editor, Alice Her- 
aom ; Makeup Editor, Martin Legere ; Pictorial Editor, David Dentan : Ex- 
change Editor, John Dickey ; News Editors, Miller Stroup, Edith Weaver, 
ran, Albert .Stubblefield, Fritz Baker; A. W. S„ Ernestine Stroup; 
W. A. A., Louie Marie Mason. 

Society stafi Luzilla Eubank, Mildred Fritchle, Muriel McClanahan, 

Sarah Mclntyre. Caroline Morrison, Lyda Roark, Sally Tompkins, Jane 
Walker. Imogens Young. Makeup staff — Edith Gaylord. Exchange staff — 
Charles Macdonald. Sports staff -Ronald Rolph, James Ransom, Dick Al- 
snn. David Waters. Proof readers — Lucy Blackman, Frances Stevenson. 
News staff — Jake Johnson. David Dentan, Gilbert Baylis, Alice Sutton. La- 
Rue Wiley, Nfanet Meredith, Claire Sweany, Elvira Cortellini, Ruth Mary 
Webster. Esther Alexander, Charles Dewing, Ken Hall, Jennie Conway, 
Mark Schreiber, Marybel Poer, Ruth Liverman, Margaret Stewart, Ann 
Daniels, Conrad Brown. Dale Ashbaugh, Frank Johnson, Jean James, Doro- 
thy Klston, Helen Miller. Ellen Perry, Susan Braerton, Dick Hall, Emma 
Louise Jordan, Virginia Botsford, Roberta McKay. 




dl 



«> A Plea 

from these pages a week ago for suggestions in regard to new yells 
and a new pep song has as yet received no response. Here is a chance 
for COLORADO COLLEGE students to show originality and to back 
a movement for the constructive good of this institution. Shall it be 
said that we have not the interest or the individuality to at least ex- 
press an honest opinion? Or does it but prove that student enthusiasm 
has, in truth, become a thing of the past at COLORADO COLLEGE. 

^ True Tradition 

is that which can stand the test of its own weight for 25 years. 
This is but one of the many reasons for the deserved popularity of 
Koshare's "Eager Heart." Written by Colorado Springs' own Mrs. Buck- 
ton and presented to COLORADO COLLEGE, it has since played to 
packed houses for over two decades. If you would see a production, 
the very simplicity of which is beautiful, you will appreciate the 2000- 
odd year old Christmas story as interpreted by our college players. It 
is more than significant that last season, with the thermometer standing 
at 28 degrees below zero, "Eager Heart" played to an audience which 
more than filled Cogswell theatre. Such is the essence of true tradition. 



Moon Madness 

Starting with a dreary first act 
that seemed to drag on intermin- 
ably (though the fault seemed to 
be in the play's writing), Koshare's 
latest effort. Children of the 
Moon given Tuesday and Wednes- 
day in Cogswell, gradually worked 
itself into a tenseness appropriate 
for this morbid study of family 
insanity. 

It concerns the efforts of Laura, 
an hysteric neurotic mother to pre- 
vent her daughter Jane from 
marrying a Major Bannister who 
gripes her terribly for no reason 
at all except that ,he's taking her 
daughter away from her, and that 
as her son was in his air division 
when he was killed in the war, she 
accuses Bannister of murdering 
her son. As a last straw s,he tells 
her daughter of the moon madness 
in the family with the pleasant re- 
sult that Jane goes nuts too. 

Outstanding were Gracia Wrye 
as Jane - - restrained, beautiful, 
easy-moving, Gordon Parker as 
cra/v Grandpa Athorlon — swell 
with his twitching beard and fin- 
ders, rolling eyes; Joe Rustin in 
the minor but well-done part of 



Higgs. "Sonny" Wrye acting Ban- 
nister was very handsome but 
stoop-shouldered and dull ; Louise 
Kirkpatrick a s Ma Laura emoted 
desperately, vociferously, some- 
times successfully; Freeland Carde 
looking like a Filipino was rather 
a vicious butler; Lyda Roark, a 
nice old granny; Fred Handke, a 
colorless physician. 

Drab in its clean medicinal buff, 
the set was dead, and like the 
play in general, lacking in any 
sparkle. Good scene: Mrs. Wrye 
in a bright light against the deep 
blue sky raising a pair of white 
arms as she realizes her own fas- 
cination for the moon. 



Christmas Chapel 

A musical hour is on the schedule 
for chapel Tuesday. Dr. Frederick 
Boothroyd has arranged an entirely 
musical program for this annual 
Christmas service. 

Included on the program: 
Rejoice Greatly, from the Messiah 

Miss Ruth Montgomery 
Cradle song by Hayti 
Good King Wenceslas 

Colorado College Choir 
Numbers bv the COLORAO COL- 
LEGE Quartet 



Social Calendar 

Friday, Dec. 8 

Sigma Chi dance 
Beta Theta Pi formal 
Saturday, Dec. 9 

Delta Gamma Christmas dance 

Gamma Phi Beta dance 
Sunday, Dec. 10 

Newman club 

Foreign Relations club 

Eager Heart 
Tuesday, Dec. 12 

Euterpe 
Wednesday, Dec. 13 

W. A. A. 
Friday, Dec. 15 

Kappa Kappa Gamma formal 

Kappa Sigma dance 



Ham And Eggs 

were served to the guests at the 
Kappa Sigma Thanksgiving Break- 
fast dance, which was held at 
Cheyenne Lodge. The romantic 
interest of the party was furnished 
by the announcement by Harry 
Fontius of the engagement of Miss 
Ruth Liverman, Delta Gamma to 
Mr. Lamar Price, Kappa Sigma, 
class of '33. 

When the guests found their 
places at the tables, they also 
found tricky little compacts bear- 
ing various types of animals and 
the Greek initials of Kappa Sigma. 




CAMPUS CHIC 

Little red hats brighten the cam- 
pus and one of the cutest is worn 
by Nadine Kent. With her chic hair- 
cut, the neat, high little hat is be- 
coming and the matching scarf 
makes her ensemble complete. Her 
wool dress is neutral tan with high 
sewing on the shoulders and down 
the sleeves, and there is a row of 
buttons down the front. The hat is 
lovely, too, with her coat of black 
lapin, cut in a jaunty swagger, with 
a high collar and large plain 
sleeves. Its simplicity is rich and 
smart. 



Tuesday, Dec 12, 10:00 a. m. 
Chapel service. A program <| 
Christmas music, featuring tr. 
choir, the quartet and Mi:, 
Ruth Montgomery in two nunl 
bers. 
Tuesday, Dec. 12, 8:00 p. m. 
A concert of religious music ofj 
ered to the public by the Cole 
rado Springs music club. 
Thursday, Dec. 14, 4:30 p. m. 
The Annual Christmas carol sen 
vice of the San Luis school: 
The Public is invited to all th| 
programs. 



Dear Sis: 

The brief respite from educa I 
tional pursuit known as Thank 
giving vacation is over, and agaii 
we settle down to the old grind an< 
worries. 

I have noticed some cute cloth 
and things: 

Elizabeth Chaney is head gir 
when it comes to shoes. Each anc 
every pair are ideal — and there an 
plenty of pairs. Nadine Kent look 
ing extra neat in her black swagge 
coat of lapin, a tiny red hat am 
scarf. Martha Murray looked granc 
at the Kappa dance in an eel graj 
dress and turban with small touche 
of orange here and there. Maidi( 
Rothgerber always looking nice 
We particularly like her new browr 
wool suit with striped blouse anc 
trimmings. The demure Lina Smitr 
going devilish on us with her cock 
eyed bright green hat. And being 
successful, too. And Julia Dunham 
cheering herself up with knock-out 
bracelets — one red, one gold, both 
heavy and sort of gleaming. 

And such are the ways of school 
mates. So I dashed down town and 
invested in one pair of socks anc 
one cake of soap. 

Must stop and venture forth to 
borrow something for the sorority] 
supper tonite. 

Unhappily yours 
Carrie 



•' 



Betas 

will frolic tonight at their annual 
Christmas formal at the Antlers ho- 
tel at 8 P. M. Forty members and 
alumni are expected to atend the 
dinner dance. 



Engagement Announced 

Kappa Alpha Theta announces 
the engagement of Lura Lou Wal- 
lace to Lloyd Ellis, Phi Gamma Del- 
ta. Laura Lou is working on 
her Master's degree in Commercial 
Law, having received her Bacheloi 
of Arts and Fine Arts degrees fromi 
the University of Nebraska. Lloyd' 
received his Bachelor of Arts from 
COLORADO COLLEGE in 1931 
and his Master of Arts from Pitts- 1 
bursjh University. He is employed!: 
ii. the advertising department of the[ 
May Company in enver. 



iday, December 8, 1933 



THE TIGER 




On 

Candy 

Counters 

Every 

Place 



The Biggest Nickel's 
worth of GOOD Candy 
You Ever Bought Try 
It! 



|EC-LA-T4y 

NEW V LINE 




HI EH, WIDE 
LINES 

;c-La-Tay" is cut in a deep "V" at 
center front to give you an alluring 
;ad-apart "unbrassiered" effect, yet 
ifls and supports the bust perfectly. 
5 back is extremely low. "Dec-La - 
r" is also made completely backless, 
evening wear. This is only one of 
ny beautiful new Maiden Form 
itions. Write for free booklet. Dept. 
Maiden Form Brassiere Co., Inc., 
n York, N. Y. 



Vos/iu'rr 1 — the 
iswre that "Jits 
a ttocking" is 
plctely seamless 
ugh the breast sec- 
s, for a "skin- 
oth" effect. It 
"S in narrow ban- 
ix as well as in 
ble Support styles 
heone shown here 




AT ALL LEADING STORES 



LOOK FOB tHB NAMi 

Maiden 



uc v < hj on: 




B P^A S S I E Ik E S 



lkOI.SS-CAR.Te»_ Sf.Tl 



NE GENUINE WITHOUT THIS LABEL 



Maiden Form Garments Sold 
in Colorado Springs at 

Kaufmans 

DEPARTMENT STORE 



Keyhole Keeper 

Short shavings: Biology boys in 
lab recently tubbed Clara Haeker in 
a tadpole tank containing 200 tad- 
poles .... Female hats lead pecul- 
iar existences — three months before 
a style is generally accepted or 
three months after it is discovered, 
women scream, "Oh, that awful 
thing, how could I ever wear it?" 
This year's hats with their peaks 
and juts seem particularly artificial- 
ly stimulated. Catherine Corning 
has an orange one built on the gen- 
eral lines of a low wing monoplane 
with the star and crescent of Kap- 
pa Sigma (or the Shriners) hover- 
ing around the fuselage. Dr. Edith 
Bramhall has a little brown number 
starting high up on the back of her 
head and going down a steep slant 
to the top of her glasses. Rosalie 
Spiller has some original concoc- 
tions shaped like 1918 doughboy 
caps made in plaid and things . . . 
With Army, Minnesota, Nebraska, 
Duke, and possibly Princeton to 
choose from (their positions never 
choose from (their position never 
seemed definitely defined) Stan- 
ford's selection of Columbia as its 
Rosebowl opponent seems particu- 
larly bleak . . Bemis buzzes: Doc 
Vanderhoof is visiting Mary Tyson 
and Pinkie Rollins is calling on 
Imogene Young . . and so "Dean" 
Cuckow gets married too — some- 
one should start a married men's 
club around here . . . Mary Jo 
Sparkman, one of the few coeds 
possessing definite distingue . Noel 
Coward's Design for Living, very 
thin in substance but with as clev- 
er and amusing dialogue as ever I 

read Lura Lu Wallace, 

Theta b i g s h o t, around again 
wearing Amanda Ellis's brother's 

Phi Gam pin 

Jean Carney gets a car from her 
folks if she knocks off ten pounds 
. . it seems that Bemis statisticians 
figured out that if girls were allow- 
ed to have food in their rooms they 
would eat less in the dining room, 
but with food upstairs mice propa- 
gated so rapidly that two cats had 
to be brought in ... . score: Bemis 
0— Cats-? .... little Roberta Mc- 
Kay seems in the throes of indecis- 
ion between Lamazure and Tommy 
Scott .... one word description of 
Henry Willumson: taciturn . . . . 
Once a Grand Duke, by Grand 
Duke Alexander, a virile, fascinat- 
ing, intelligent picture of old-regime 
Russia .... Martha Murray still 
persists in her cheery Swiss "haloo" 
.... Miss Tate, the nicest librarian 
.... notice Mildred Fritchle's 
started smoking now .... one of 
Bemis's gals overheard someone 
saying to Sande Walker: "I knew 
you'd come back from vacation 
with one, but I didn't expect you'd 
have two rings '* 



HOW ABOUT A STUDY 
SIDELINE? 

What's that? More study? Well, yes 
and no. We've started a new Radio 
Course for you "bugs" who like to 
build or tinker with radio's. It's 
called "Theory of Radio," and is 
in charge of an expert. Classes daily 
from 8 to 9 a. m. Night School 
Classes Mondays and Thursdays at 
7 p. m. 

Blair's Business College 

DeGraff Bldg. Phone 1160 



A SERVICE FOR 
EVERY PURSE— 

Consistent users of Ivory Soap 
for twenty-two years. 



The PEARL 
Laundry 



w. I.LUCAS 

— HAS— 

EVERYTHING IN SPORTINC 
I GOODS— 



f "Tigers Always Welcome" 

n 

120 North Tejon Street 
Main 900 



Firestone 
one-stop. 

SERVICE 



Let Us 
Prepare Your Car . 
for Winter Driving 



Complete Lubrication 

Motor Oils 

Batteries and Repairing 

Firestone Anti-freeze 

Prestone and Alcohol 



Brake Relining and Adjusting 

Texaco "Fire Chief" Gasoline 

"Red Head" Car Heaters 

f&tstou* Tire* 

115-121 N. Nevada 
Phone M. 202 



SHEFF & SON 

SUPERIOR FORD SERVICE 

827 N. Tejon M. 1317 



igllllllllllMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMII 



Say Boys — 



PampbelFs 
Barber 
Shop 



IS 

at 



109 East Pikes Peak Ave. 



•{■iMIIllllllllllllllllMlllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllilllllllllilillililllimrii!^ 



|| $1.00 A Week (I 

Buys a new standard 
Typewriter 



in»»»»m»nm » » » m n roffittnmffi 



New Portables: 

$14.95 
$29.50 
$34.50 
$45.00 
$60.00 



The 

Typewriter 

Man 



125 N. Tejon M. 95 

a»»»»t»K»tn»ti»n:t»t»ttt»»»» 




n 



Have your Nugget photo- 
graphs made now and avoid 
the rush 

tkemery 

STUDIO 

Fine Portraiture 
Across from the campus 



Colorado College 

TEXT BOOKS 

AND SUPPLIES 

C. C. and Fraternity 

Stationery 

Laundry Bags — $2.00 Each 

Murray Drug Co. 

Across From the Campus 



4 



* 



THE TIGER 



Friday, December 8, 19 1 




Coburn Library 

COLORADO COLLEGE 

Colorado Springs, Colorado 
Fully accredited 



Co-educational 



Adequate equipment and high standards of scholastic attainment 
make Colorado College one of the outstanding Liberal Arts Col- 
leges of the country. 

A large faculty makes possible an individual friendly guidance 
for each student 

Thorough and interesting courses in the Schools of ARTS and 
SCIENCES, LETTERS and FINE ARTS, the NATURAL SCI- 
ENCES, and the SOCIAL SCIENCES develop his mind in prep- 
aration for purposeful effective living in the modern world. 

Unsurpassed climate, beautiful environment and the influence of 
a cultured community combine to make study at COLORADO 
COLLEGE a privilege. 



C. B. HERSHEY, A. Ml, ED. D., Acting President 



Give Photos for Xmas 

Call Main 3328-J today 
for appointment — 

WAGNER-FULTS 
STUDIO 

Burns Theatre Bldg. 

Official Colorado College 

Photographer 

We carry a fine assortment of 
Hi Class frames. 




Suede Leather Jackets 

-fe $£.95 



wear 
now — 
or for 
Christmas Gifts 



ENUINE SUEDE LEATHER 
jackets, in the 
length 



r 

1] j a c k e i s, in the new 
waistline length — only 20 
of them, and after this sale they 
will be $7.50. They have 3-inch 
stand-up or turn-over Johnny col- 
lar, button front, large pocket, and 
and adjustable ring straps at sides. 
In the smart new shades of cocoa 
and London tan. Sizes 12 to 38. 



^And, of Course! You'll 
Find Other Jackets for 
Gifts in Our Complete Jacket Shop! 



Other Suede Jackets up to $10.50 

Glove-Leather Jackets $7.50 

These are belted coat styles 

Suede-Cloth Jackets $4.50 to $5.95 

Also Corduroy Jackets at these prices 
SECOND FLOOR 





Department Store 



Everything that's Good to Eat 

..WHIPPED CREAM FUGDE AND HOLIDAY BOXES 



PLACE YOUR ORDER NOW 
SPECIAL PRICES TO FRATERNITIES 

CARAMEL CRISP SHOP 

109 North Tejon 



Subscribe NOW for The 

GAZETTE .TELEGRAPH 

Morning — Evening — Sunday All The News All The Time 



Daily Only 
I 5c per week 



Daily and Sunday 
20c per week 



Combination 
35c per week 








lMu«d each week during the academic year. Entered at the »oit Office at Colorado Spring! aa Second-Clan Matter. 



THE TIGER 



Friday, December 15, 1933 



Firesfone 

ONE STOP 
SERVICE 



Let Us 
Prepare Your Car . 
for Winter Driving 



Complete Lubrication 

Motor Oils 

Batterier and Repairing 

Firestone Anti-freeze 

Prestone and Alcohol 



Brake Relining and Adjusting 

Texaco "Fire Chief" Gasoline 

"Red Head" Car Heaters 

Tu**fou« Tlvtm 

115-121 N. Nevada 
Phone M. 202 



+ — 

i 



Reward's 

Q^Barber 

P Shop 
V9 



19 East Bijou Street 



Pack Bags 
Laundry Bags 
Hikers Supplies 

THE OUTWEST 
TENT and AWNING CO. 



M. 1261 



18 E. Kiowa 



To Maintain 
A Payroll in 
Colorado Springs 




row 

COAL/ 

Phone Main 577 




Stepping . . . Ill say they're 
stepping. Just about the best 
cigarette you ever smoked. 

Chesterfields are milder 
Chesterfields taste better 




estertield 

the cigarette that's MILDER 



© 1933. Liggett & Myers Tobacco Co. 



the cigarette that TASTES BETTER 






^ "INM"" 



9 



ACROSS FROM MURRAY'S 



Strachan's 

SWEET SHOP 

Bijou and Nevada 



IRA C. DUGAN 

Jeweler and Optometrist 

Fine Watch and Clock Repairing 

Eyes Examined — Glasses Fitted 

— Lenses Duplicated — 

Phone Main 1702-J 9 N. Tcjon St. 



THE TIGER 



VOLUME XXXVI 



COLORADO COLLEGE WEEKLY NEWS-MAGAZINE 



Number 13 



♦ e A M P u 



Specialty Numbers 

will be an added feature of Pan 
Pan scheduled for Jan. 8, 1934 
with a master of ceremonies in 
charge of a unit show idea that is 
being planned by the managers. 
The plans are to have specialty 
numbers between acts to do away 
with the lull and drull that have 
been so prominent between pre- 
sentations in past productions of 
Pan Pan. 

In regard to specialty numbers, 
there must be hidden somewhere 
on the campus actors, singers, mu- 
sicians, orators, comedians and ma- 
gicians of unusual ability and it is 
the desire of the Pan Pan man- 
agers to reveal this hidden talent 
to followers of fraternity capers. If 
you have such talent and wish to 
become a part of the greatest vau- 
deville show ever presented at 
COLORADO COLLEGE then make 
your versatilities known to either 
Arthur G. Sharp, Lew Crosby or 
Richard Hall. 



Congratulations 

to Mr. and Mrs. Trellyen Now- 
els, Jr., on the birth of a "bounc- 
ing" baby boy on Wednesday, 
Dec. 12. Mrs. Nowels was Mar- 
garet Mellis, popular Delta Gam- 
ma, of the class of '33. The proud 
father, "Trel," is a member of 
Beta Theta Pi and class of '31. He 
is connected with the Gazette and 
Telegraph newspapers. The three 
members of the family are report- 
ed as "doing fine." 



When 

Edward Stanley, chief of the 
Associated Press bureau in Denver, 
finished telling one of his good 
stories about the British royal fam- 
ily to the Journalism 301 class last 
Friday, every one was afraid to 
laugh for fear that they would miss 
the point of the next one. 

Pinked cheeked and impeccably 
dressed, Stanley told of his experi- 
ences as feature writer with the 
foreign staff of the Associated 
Press stationed in London. The 
bow legs of Duchesses, the shyness 
of princes, and the hats of the 
Queen were described in the inimi- 
table manner of the experienced 
feature writer. 



A German Christmas 

was described by Mrs. Sutton 
for the entertainment of the Ger- 
man club, which held a meeting 
and social get-together at the Phi 
Delt house on Wednesday evening. 
Refreshments were served, and the 
members sang German songs. 



Lying 

in the hospital recovering from 
injuries sustained in a fall, Mrs. C. 
B. Hershey was surprised by a sere- 
nade from a group of senior girls 
last Sunday night. The merry car- 
ol singers led by Billie Sullivan 
made the room of the president's 
wife one of the stops in a round of 
serenades. 

Other stops included the frater- 
nity houses, where the singers were 
sometimes invited in for refresh- 
ments and sometimes left out in the 
cold, several private parties, and 
ended up with a seemingly inap- 
propriate oyster stew lunch at Be- 
mis. 



Directed 

by English,high-foreheaded, gift- 
ed Prof. C. C. Bayley, the History 
Club of COLORADO COLLEGE 
will undertake a series of discus- 
sions in the Oxford manner on his- 
torical and current topics. 

The plan is this: A person who 
is an authonty on the subject un- 
der discussion will introduce the 
subiect; and after the affirmative 
?nd negative have spoken, the 
members present will take part in 
the general debate. 

Mr. Blayley has stated that this 
nlan has worked verv well in the 
History club at the University of 
Toronto of which he was formerly 
advisor. 



Athletic Christmas 

Saint Nicholas was once again 
welcomed to the W. A. A. club- 
house Wednesday night when that 
organization held its annual Christ- 
mas party. The evening's program 
consisted of a Christmas play which 
was arranged by Jean Crawford, 
carols by Martha Statton, and the 
reading of Christmas poetry by Jo- 
anna Jollv and Ruth Crawford. 
Roberta Tapley was in charge of 
the entertainment and Helen Den- 
tan of the food. Highlights of the 
evening was the presentation of a 
carved fireside stool to Miss Fezer 
as a token of the appreciation and 
good-will of W. A. A. 



Musicale 

Last Sunday evening a few col- 
lege girls were guests at an infor- 
mal musicale given at the Hamlin 
home by Mrs. Tor Hylbom. An in- 
structive and delightful evening 
was spent in discussing the origin 
and development of music with il- 
lustrative selections. 



Only Two Copies 

of William Godwin's "The Lives 
of John and Edward Phillips" are 
known to be in existence and Co- 
burn library has one copy, it was 
revealed, following receipt of a let- 
ter from Edward Smith Parsons, 
president of Marietta college, Ohio. 
Harvard claimed the only copy of 
the lives of the nephews and pu- 
pils of John Milton until Dr. Par- 
sons, who was a Bemis professor 
of English and dean of the college 
of arts and sciences between the 
years 1893 and 1917, recalled that 
he purchased such a book for Co- 
burn library while abroad in 1901. 
The book was published in 1815 
in London. 

"Milton's Historical, Political 
and Miscellaneous Works", printed 
in Amsterdam in 1698 was also re- 
ceived at the college library in 
1901, but the source is unknown. 
It consists of three volumes. 



College Calendar 

The new COLORADO COLLEGE 
calendars may be obtained from the 
secretary's office in the Administra- 
tion building. The cost of the cal- 
endars has been reduced this year 
to 20 cents. This includes enve- 
lope and cardboard for mailing. 



Music Meeting 

On Wednesday night Euterpe 
had their annual Christmas party 
at Bemis. Refreshments were 
served during the social hour which 
followed the program. 
Piano: Kammenoi-Ostrow 

- - - - - - - Rubinstein 

Jack Kintz 
Dance: Holland Dance 

Joan Giese and Billy Mitchell 
Mrs. Doris Barnhart, accompanying 
Violin: Romance D Minor Con- 
certo ----- Wieniawski 

Mary Mansfield 
Piano: Improvisations 

Jean Miller 
Voice: Oh Holy Night - - - 

Adolph Adams 

Clifford Kolsrud 
Miss Emily Lyders, accompanying 
Dance: La Belle Espanol 
Susan Armstrong 
Sevillanas 

Susan Armstrong 
Miss Fielding 
Mrs. Doris Barnhart, accompanying 
Piano: Seguidilla - - Albeniz 

Malaguena - - - Lecuona 
Jane Wahtola 
Christmas Carols 



Intermural Trophies 

were presented at the student 
assembly Thursday to the frater- 
nities winning last year's interfra- 
ternity competition in sports. The 
presentation was made by Profes- 
sor Arthur Sharp, chairman of the 
interfraternity council to the fra- 
ternities in football, Kappa Sigma; 
Horseshoes, Phi Delta Theta; Bas- 
ketball, Kappa Sigma; Swimming, 
Phi Delta Theta; Tennis, Sigma 
Chi; Track, Sigma Chi; Baseball, 
Phi Delta Theta. 



Colorado College 

presented its annual program of 
Christmas music, arranged and di- 
rected by Dr. Frederick Boothroyd, 
Tuesday at chapel hour. In addi- 
tion to the musical numbers the 
story of the Nativity was read by 
Dr. James G. McMurtry. 

The program of music follows: 
Traditional carol from Haytii 
Colorado College Choir 
Solo, "Rejoice Greatly," from "The 
Messiah" 

Miss Ruth Montgomery 
"Holy Night" 

Colorado College Quartet 
Organ Solo, "Variations on a 
Christmas Carol" 

Dr. Boothroyd 
Solo, "Holy Child" 

Miss Ruth Montgomery 
Carol Anthem, "Good King Wen- 
ceslas" 

Colorado College Choir 



Scarlet And White 

On Thursday afternoon the San 
Luis school presented its sixteenth 
annual Christmas Carol Service at 
Shove Chapel. Vivid in their scar- 
let cassocks and white surplices, 
all of the students were included 
in the lovely service prepared by 
Miss Lucinda Shutt with Charles 
Bybee as organist. 



Pledging 

to Alpha Kappa Psi honorary 
business fraternity was held Sun- 
day afternoon at the Business De- 
partment office in Palmer hall, 
with John Dickey, Robert Lama- 
zure, Phil Reilly. and David Wat- 
ers, Business majors eligible for the 
organization, going through the 
ceremony. 



Hiijh School Visiting 

William D. Copeland, Secretary 
of the College, has been visiting 
High Schools and contacting pros- 
pective students in Rocky Ford, 
La Junta. Manzanola and Fowler 
this week. 






THE TIGER 



Friday, December 15, 193 



THE TIGER 




Editor 



LEW CROSBY 



Business Manager E. F. STAPLETON 

EDITORIAL STAFF 

Editors: Managing Editor, Bob Johnson: Campus Editor, Joseph Lowe; 
Sports Editors, Harold Marlowe, John Bicknell ; Society Editor, Alice Her- 
som ; Makeup Editor, Martin Legere ; Pictorial Editor, David Dentan ; Ex- 
change Editor, John Dickey : News Editors, Miller Stroup, Edith Weaver, 
Pes Swan. Albert Stubblefield. Fritz Baker; A. W. S., Ernestine Stroup; 
W. A. A., Louie Marie Mason. 

Society staff — Luzilla Eubank, Mildred Fritchle, Muriel McClanahan, 
Sarah Mclntyre. Caroline Morrison, Lyda Roark, Sally Tompkins, Jane 
Walker. Imogens Young:. Makeup staff — Edith Gaylord. Exchange staff — 
Charles Macdonald. Sports staff — Ronald Rolph. James Ransom, Dick Al- 
son, David Waters. Proof readers — Lucy Blackman. Frances Stevenson. 
News staff — Jake Johnson. David Dentan. Gilbert Baylis, Alice Sutton, La- 
Rue Wiley, Nanet Meredith. Claire Sweany, Elvira Cortellini, Ruth Mary 
Webster. Esther Alexander. Charles Dewing, Ken Hall, Jennie Conway, 
Mark Schreiber. Marybel Poer. Ruth Liverman. Margaret Stewart, Ann 
Daniels. Conrad Brown. Dale Ashbaugh, Frank Johnson. Jean James, Doro- 
thy Elston, Helen Miller. Ellen Perry. Susan Braerton, Dick Hall, Emma 
Louise Jordan, Virginia Botsford, Roberta McKay. 




+ Regardless 

of the fact that for thirty-odd years TIGER editors have said much 
the same thing; allowing too, for the commercializing influences that 
have displaced Santa's reindeer bells with price tags, and in spite of 
the fact that the wolf howls at the old portals with little less vigor at 
this, then at any other time, we still believe that there is ample reason 
for wishing you all the best and most cheerful of holiday celebrations 
and every wish for a Happy New Year. 



Carrie Co-ed's Letter 

Dear Sis: — 

Will be off and away for home 
by this time tomorrow. Please pre- 
pare a warm and comfy bed, lots 
of good meals, and don't be 
alarmed at a rotten disposition. 
This week has been hectic. All the 
good ole professors have been pop- 
ing tests, demanding term papers 
and required unending reading. 
Just the thing for the week before 
\acation you know. 

We had a formal dinner at the 
dormitorv Wednesday night. Much 
red candles, Don Haney's orches- 
tra and all. Some of us had dates. 
After once dragging the poor males 
through the door all went well. 

There have been gobs of parties 
and things lately. If there were 
one more week of it I would sure- 
ly give up. The sorority decided 
best have a tree and sillv gifts. It 
was a riot. I won't tell you the 
poem that was with mine until I 
get home. I nearly died. 

One of the sisters announced her 
engagement Monday nite. Honest- 
ly I feel like an old maid, and at 
my tender years. The single and 
unengaged girls are in the minor- 
ity. Its not safe to accuse your 
next door neighbor of being unmar- 
ried for fear the announcement 
will appear the next day. What a 
school, and what a bunch of peo- 
ple! 

See you soon. You will be 
amazed at the wreck I am of my 
former cheery self. Frowzy, dis- 
tracted, annoyed, frantic, worn- 
out and discouraged, mentally, 
morally and physically. 

Love and kissee — 

Carrie. 



The other Christmas party to be 
given tonight is that of the Kappa 
Sigma chapter. The dance will be 
held at the Chapter house, which 
will be elaborately decorated in the 
Christmas spirit. Rumor has it 
that Santa Claus will have visited 
the Kappa Sig Christmas tree be- 
fore the party, but that's supposed 
to be a secret! 



HAROLD BRITTON 

"Fiji crooner 

Famous for his imitation of Paul 
Whiteman's "When Day is Done" 
as played on his silver-toned trum- 
pet, Harold Britton, popular mu- 
sician with Johnny Metzler's or- 
chestra now playing at the Broad- 
moor Nite Club every Saturday 
night, is one of the most talented 
members of the band. 

"Britty" played one year with 
Roy Mack, one of the bigger M. 
C. A. orchestras, and one summer 
he performed with Johnny Hamp's 
band. 

COLORADO COLLEGE, ex '33, 
"Britty" was a Phi Gam here in 
his college days. He has played 
with Metzler for eight years, drives 
a maroon Chev coupe, and is en- 
gaged to blonde Eileen Woods. 



Charles J. Gaupp, 

district manager of the Ame 
can Tobacco company, was aga 
a recent visitor about the COL( 
RADO COLLEGE campus, frate 
nities and sororities in the intere 
of Lucky Strike Cigarettes. M 
Gaupp in many instances demoi 
strated the quality of Luckies 
the students, bringing out very fo 
cibly the truth of his company 
ads which appear regularly in tr 
TIGER. 

Mr. Gaupp is also a welcom 
visitor to the campus as he has 
pleasing personality and usually 
very gracious with his Luckies. 



' 



A Christmas Formal 

The Delta Gamma formal Christ- 
mas dance was held at the Antlers 
Hotel on Saturday evening, Dec. 9. 
Clever gold and green programs, 
each bearing the name of guest, 
served as placecards at the tables. 
The chaperons were Prof, and Mrs. 
William Blakely and Mr. and Mrs. 
Gerge Keener. 



Debate Try-Outs 

At debate trv-outs December 4 
and 1 1 , about 20 made the squad. 
Others interested may still come 
out after the holidays. Prospects 
are good for the vear and several 
trips are being planned for both 
men and women this spring. 



Even Boys Are Eligible 

for the fashion contest offered b 
Marshall Field and Company, man 
ufacturers. They are offering twen 
ty prizes that range from $150 t 
the smallest group of individu 
$10 prizes. Any person register! 
in a college or university can pa 
ticipate in this contest. Either 
pen, pencil or colors, sketch a dr 
which will be attractive and ha' 
the style which is desired. If y| 
are interested to enter in this coi 
test the necessary details may 
gotten from Ruth Edwards. 



Fo 

Not the Same Spiel I » 

Members of the COLORADO ft 
COLLEGE choir were shocked! lt 



Push Game 

You don't have to throw your 
glove in someone's face to chal- 
lenge them to a shuffleboard match. 
Just sign up on the ladder sched- 
ule down in McGregor gym. This 
sport under the direction of Nor- 
ma Garrett has been going on for 
about three weeks with some of 
the strongest contestants in the 
tournament being Dean Fauteaux, 
Miss Fezer, Dorothea Carleton, and 
Miss Ryan. 

Smart guy, huh? A teacher 
placed a picture of an old gent 
with a long white beard in front of 
the class and asked them to name 
him, the answers ranged all the way 
from Mae West to General Grant, 
when pinned down and asked who 1 ' 
it was, the prof said he didn't 
know. 



Strength 

Eighty thousand pounds pressure 
can be exerted by the machine 
used in the engineering deDartment 
of COLORADO COLLEGE for 
testing the compressabiHty of con- 
crete. Tt is located in the basement 
of Cutler. 

Cylinders of concrete are tested 
bv the machine to determine their 
adaDtibility for use in various 
building projects and also to de- 
termine what type of material is 
most suitable. 

There is also a machine which 
tests the tension of concrete. Com- 
pression and tension of steel bars 
can be determined by other ma- 
chines. 



Judges Of The Dance 

at the Silver Glade ballroom in 
the Cosmopolitan, Denver's most 
uptown hostelry, wi'l be well rep- 
resented among COLORADO COL- 
LEGE studes during the holidays. 

Lew Crosby officiates Friday 
night. Dec. 22, with Richard Hall 
and Everett Stapleton doing t h e 
honors the following week-end. 

The college-judged intercollegi- 
ate dance contest is becoming a 
Friday night special for entertain- 
ment over the week-end. 



when they were asked if they san 
the same anthem at each chapi 
service. The choir has not repeat 
ed an anthem this year and since 
the aim is to prepare a differen 
anthem for each chapel service : 
nrobably will continue to do so ui 
less one is repeated by request. 

Trekking twice each week to th 
battle room of the Shove Memoria 
chapel to struggle with F sha 
and D Flats and then to have som| 
one ask them if they were repp. 
ing the same anthem was aim 
too much for the choir. It wonde: 
if thev were so bad or the st 
dents had a poor ear for music. 



"Psvchopathological 

Research Studies in Mental Di 
sociation" is the wordy title of o 
of the 148 new books received 
Coburn library recently. Most 
the books, however, have more i 
terest for the average reader. 

Outstanding among the nel 
books are: "My Battle" by Ado 
Hitler: "Essays" by W. B. Yates 
"Ah Wilderness" by Eugeni 
O'Neill; "New Background of Sci- 
ence" by Sir James Jeans; "Eco- 
nomic Democracy" by R. S. Brook- 
ings; and "America Through Wom- 
en's Eyes" by Mary Beard. 

Miss Louise Kampf, librarian, 
periodically publishes a list of new 
books which have been received. 



Friday, December 15, 1933 



THE TIGER 




What Better 
Gift Than 
Derngood 
Chocotates 



26 S. Tejon 



Bern's 



MARION KINGSTON 

Singer, Dancer, Platinum 
Blond. The newest Jean 
Harlow edition from Holly- 
wood at the Silver Glade — 
Cosmopolitan Hotel, Denver. 



DUKE UNIVERSITY 

SCHOOL OF MEDICINE 

DURHAM, N. C. 

Four terms of eleven weeks are given each 
year. These may be taken consecutively 
(M. D. in three years) or three terms may 
be taken each year (M. D. in four years). 
The entrance requirements are intelli- 
gence, character and at least two years of 
college work, including the subjects speci- 
fied for Grade A Medical Schools. Cata- 
logues and application forms may be ob- 
tained from the Dean. 



The Kodak 

as a Gift 
and Creator 
of Gifts 

Not only the Kodaks 
and Brownies themselves 
for gifts, but from your 
Kodak or Brownie nega- 
tives we can make Christ- 
mas Cards, Enlargements, 
Statuettes, extra prints to 
enclose in packages, pic- 
tures to frame. 




17 N. Tejon 



JOE E. HILL 

BROKER 

820 SIXTEENTH ST. 
Suite 720-721 Symes Bldg., Denver, Colo. 



LOANS 

Negotiated for Salaried Men and Women in 
Amounts of $5.00 and Up 

No Security — No Endorsers 



QUICK, CONFIDENTIAL 
SERVICE 



KEYHOLE 
EEPER 



Senior gals Christmas caroling 
Sunday night were received at the 
Kappa Sig house by one boy peer- 
ing out the window .... Sigs and 
the Phi Gams took them in for 
food . . Bob Shonsby here for the 
weekend visiting Jack Sherk at the 
Plaza broke the bed with them- 
selves in it Friday night .... one 
word description of Prof. Malone: 
Prissy .... at the Broadmoor Sat- 
urday night were Swede and Jim, 
GB Blackman and Joe Rustin, 
Fritchle and Bob Sheehan, Lois 
Waldorf and Pat Patterson, Ray 
Lowell, Stape and a Pueblo gal, 
Mary Tyson .... Swede, by the 
way, left last Wednesday for Mem- 
phis, Texas, a la the hitch-hike 
route with plans rumored to be im- 
pending marriage with the South- 
ern beauty who leaves Colorado 
Springs Saturday by train for Tex- 
as ... . nomination for the most 
peculiar name: Aelred Ostdick . . . 
he's a sophomore right here .... 
Edith Lynch and Roy Wolfe walk- 
I ing into the Rialto theater Sunday 
J afternoon to Joan Crawford's Danc- 
! ing Lady .... which movie seemed 
; iust fair, Joan rather tiresome . . . 
Margerite Dixon is receiving visi- 
tors at McGregor infirmary after an 
aDpendicitis stay at BethEl .... 
"Lead - guide - and - direct - us" 
McMurtry .... general uproar in 
a recent psychology class made it 
impossible for Willett Willis to fin- 
ish this sentence, "Now if I should 
marry a negress, what would hap- 
pen --".... Helen Zuehlke of 
the healthy look and unusual color- 
mg — brown eyes, yellow hair . . . 
G'eason and Giesecke made a 
round trip to Denver last Friday — 
up in the afternoon to get dates 
for the Beta formal at night and 
back with them after the dance . . 
. . an orchid to Harriet Engel for 
her performance in Eager Heart . . 
. . very charming .... and a seal- 
lion to Bert Price for not keeping 
a date with Madonna Barbara Dut- 
lon .... by the way, Caroline Hur- 
ley was presented with an orchid 
by her date to the Delta Gamma 
formal. The flower came the night 
before and when morning came, 
poor orchid had wilted away — 
ever since Miss Hurley has been 
making desperate attempts to re- 
vive orchid .... Duane Osborne 
left for New York Monday to desk 
clerk at the Waldorf-Astoria and 
study piano on the side 



♦EXCHANGES 

The University of Pittsburg has 
been placed in one tall skyscraper, 
The Cathedral of Learning. The 
only campus will be a roof garden. 

Students at Louisiana Tech are 
"earning their way through" by 
running a free telephone informa- 
tion service, but users must listen 
to an advertising talk before the 

info is given. 

*•* .•. .«. 

The famous Mae West line gets 

religion. The bulletin board at 

Drake university reads: "Come up 

some time — any time — to the 

Christian Endeavor meeting." 
••• ••. ••• 

Up till now, Stanford men refer- 
red to a girl on the campus as one- 
five hundredth for the enrollment 

was limited to 500 women. 
••• ••■ ... 

Some professors think their 
course is important in the curricula 
and others give cuts. 



Thirty-nine freshmen at the Uni- 
versity of Florida were promised 
the class presidency of their class 
during an active campaign of rush 
week. 



FLASH. The class in pickling at 
the University of Oregon announ- 
ces to the world that they have 
found the way to make sweet pick- 
les sour, after years of research. 

— Los Angeles Junior Collegian 
••• •»• •«• 

Gussie says it's a good thing we 
recognized Russia when we did . . 
. After December 5th it is doubt- 
ful if America will be able to rec- 
ognize anything. 

— Utah Chronicle 
••• ••• ••« 

Princeton freshmen admit they 
prefer Phi Beta Kappa keys to var- 
sity letters. 







Gifts 



Fine Stationery 

Fountain Pens 

Pencil 

Leather Note Books 

Drawing Supplies 

Billfolds Card Cases 

Brief Cases 

Book Plates 

Christmas Cards 

for Individuals 

Ou^West 

Printing Cr 
StationeryCo. 

Colorado Springs Colo, 



THE TIGER 



Friday, December 15, 1933 



EXAMINATIONS 

Students who are able to review complete 
notes are much better prepared for ex- 
aminations. With ABC Shorthand, which 
is quickly learned in 12 easy lessons, you 
can take lecture and reading notes verba- 
tim. Complete course now sells for $1.00 

Pikes Peak Book & Stationery Co. 



Shampoo and Finger Wave 
50 cents 

MARY SUTTON 
BEAUTY SHOP 

M. 1186 105 E. Cache la Poudre 



1 

J* 



JEWELRY— THE LASTING GIFT 

Here are suggestions for the Whole Family 

Wrist or Pocket Watches from $7.50 — Diamond Rings from 

$5.00 — Necklaces from $2.50 — Silver Ware, Sterling and 

Plate. Clocks, Keywind and Electric 

OR 

Get out that old watch from its hiding place and have it 
repaired. WE GUARANTEE ALL REPAIRS. 

C. B. LAUTERMAN 

121 North Tejon Colorado Springs 



COMPLIMENTS 



Western Auto Supply Co. 

TA 4146—1376 BROADWAY 



PAT PATIENCE 



Denver 



Colo. 



OFFICE work is probably the surest 
field for young women today, es- 
pecially those with college prep- 
aration bave an advantage. Prepare thor- 
oughly for this field in a school that special- 
izes in office training. 

Intensive courses for college students. 

Call or write for folder. 



COMMERCIAL SCHOOL 

DENVER, COLORADO 

Winter term opens January 2, 1933. 



PORT 



TIGER ROARS 




The Big Eight 

COLORADO COLLEGE'S with- 
drawal from the Rocky Mountain 
Conference to The Big Eight was 
quite a surprise to students as well 
as COLORADO COLLEGE back- 
ers. Defined as "The Biggest Lit- 
tle College in the West" the Tiger 
will match strides with the larger 
schools of the conference next fall. 
COLORADO COLLEGE was al- 
lowed to enter the eight only after 
a strenuous two-day session. We 
were allowed to enter the "Big 
Eight" only because of our past 
records and the past 1933 season 
was disregarded. Members of this 
newly formed league are Utah Uni- 
versity, Brigham Young, Colorado 
Aggies, COLORADO COLLEGE, 
Colorado University, Denver Uni- 
versity, Wyoming University, and 
Utah Aggies. We understand that 
Teachers along with Colorado 
Mines are going to appeal to the 
governor of Colorado insisting they 
received a "dirty deal." 
••• ••■ ■•■ 

Hot From The Hardwood 

Basketball season will be in full 
swing ere long as the basketeers of 
COLORADO COLLEGE prepare 
for several practice games before 
the opening of the 1934 season. 
The team will leave Sunday for a 
road trip to Utah where they will 
encounter strong teams namely, 
Uiah, Utah Aggies and Brigham 
Young. Both A and B squads have 
been chosen and immediately after 
the holidays the strenuous confer- 
ence race will be well on its way. 



Didrikson Did Her Best 

Tuesday night and walked off 
the floor with a 35-29 decision 
over the strong all star team com- 
posed of the best players available 
in Colorado Springs. Babe caged 
two field goals and played exactly 
12'/2 minutes of the contest. The 
rest of the time she was busy auto- 
graphing books (and wbat have 
vou) for over enthused college 
boys. 



209 Cheyenne Road 
Colorado Springs, Colo. 
Dear Santa Claus: 

For Xmas. I would like 40,000 
square yards of adhesive tape. I 
have been a busy and faithful lad 
the past year and would appreci- 
ate this very much, 
I am Waiting, 

Howard Waite. 
P. S. I don't need it, but would 
appreciate some mercurochrome. 



1337 N. Cascade 

December 15, 1933 

Dear Santa Claus: 

Please bring me additional 
games to be scheduled next fal 
We also would like a new stadium 
but we will forget that for the time 
being. 

Your little friend, 

Jo E. Irish. 
P. S. Don't forget, I would like 
some tiack material this spring. 

Colorado Springs. 
Dear Santa Claus: 

I am a little boy and I live at 
1105 N. Nevada. For Xmas, I 
would like a new knee. — I have a 
desire to be a star on the gridiron 
next fall. Please don't forget my 
fraternity brother who is in need 
of a pair of good crutches. 
Your friend, 

Don Creager. 

1122 N. Cascade. 
Colorado Springs. 
Dear Santa: 

Stephie and I would like lots of 
material for our 1934 gridiron 
campaign. We have had lots of 
hard luck this past year but are 
expecting to do much better next 
fall. 

Sincerely, 

Clanton Roach. 

December 15, 1933. 
Dear Santa: 

I am just a little boy and for 
1934 I would like a winning foot- 
ball team. Please leave the injuries 
at home. 

Bullingly yours, 

Willian T. Van de Graaff. 

Tank Champs 

Phi Delta Theta fr?temity sue- 1 
cessfully defended their swimming . 
title in the annual intra-mural meet J 
held at the Broadmoor pool Satur-v 
day. The boys at 1105 gathered 
27 points by taking three firsts and 
two seconds. Kappa Sigma barely 
nosed out Phi Gama Delta as they 
collected 1 5 points to the Phi 
Gam's 13. Fourth place was taken 
by Delta Alpha Phi and fifth by 
the Independents. There were no 
entries made bv either the Sigma 
Chi's or Beta Theta Pi. 

Walsh. Phi Gamma Delta's flash 
won individual honors by winning 
two firsts, the 500 and 100 free 
stvle races. Daniels, Phi Delta 
Theta, won second scoring honors 
with two seconds. Other events 
were won bv Smith. Kappa Sigma, 
breast stroke; Huff. Kappa Sigma, 
25 vard free-stvle; Udick. Phi Del- 
ta Theta, back-stroke; Anderson, 
Phi Delta Theta. diving. The re- 
lay was won bv K. Hall, deHolc- 
zer. Daniels, and R. Hall ; Phi Del- 
ta Theta. 



Friday, December 15, 1933 



THE TIGER 



OCIAL 



CHAPEL CALENDAR 
Friday, Dec. 22, 1:00 P. ML— 

The Annual Convocation Service 
of the Colorado Springs High 
School. 
Vednesday, Dec. 27, 4:30 P. M.— 

An Organ Recital with a capel- 
la numbers by the High School 
Chorus honoring the delegated 
members of the Colorado Edu- 
cation Association in their mid- 
winter meeting. Public Invited. 



Christmas Cheer 

The guests at the Beta Theta Pi 
ormal dinner-dance, held at t h e 
Antlers Ballroom on Friday eve- 
ling, Dec. 8, were served Sparkling 
Jurgundy as a prelude to a seven 
tourse dinner. Following the din- 
ier, the guests danced to a musical 
nenu in the modern manner with 
lances listed as Dry Martinis, Tom 
Collins, Side Cars, Gin Fizz, Cham- 
lagne Cocktail, not forgetting the 
nore plebian favorites, the White 
llephant and the Long Tom Cooi- 
r. 

Chaperons at the dance included 
Hr. and Mrs. J. Russel DeFries 
nd Mr. and Mrs. Howard Waite. 



'urkey Buffet Supper 

was served to some thirty - five 
Jetas by Ronald Rolph at his home 
t 1927 N. Nevada Ave. on Sun- 
lay evening, Dec. 10. Supper was 
erved from 6:00 to 8:00 o'clock. 




CAMPUS CHIC 



This is the time of year when 
everyone is wearing just anything 
3 school, waiting for Christmas 
nd new clothes. So it is refresh- 
lg to see Jean James in a darling 
ew wool dress of golden tan in 
le latest mode. It is trimmed in 
ark brown yarn with heavy frin- 
es on the shoulders and the end 
f the scarf. She wears to dances 

black semi-formal, long and 
raceful with great puff sleeves, 
n the shoulders is a cord-like roll 
f orange metallic cloth, and the 
ime material makes the belt. The 
ress has a high neckline, but the 
aening in the back gives a sug- 
:stion of more formal lines. Her 
rap is black velvet with an enor- 
ous white fox collar. She is very 
:riking in her rich ensemble. 



Bootstrings 

knotted up in the worst of fash- 
ion, pasteboard boxes over smok- 
ing chimneys, skiing, toboganning, 
hiking, snow fights, singing around 
the fireplace, and even bridge filled 
last weekend for those who attend- 
ed the Many Pines Chalet house- 
party. Chaperons were Mr. and 
Mrs. G. E. Ehrman, Mrs. A. S. Gill, 
and Miss Marion Fezer. Other hik- 
ers present included the Misses 
Eleanor Hastings, Dorothea Carle- 
ton, Coral Sherwood, Rosamond 
Clarke, Audrey Gill, Mary Jo 
Sparkman, Katherine Ragle, Elpha 
Bowman, and Norma Garrett; and 
the Messrs. Arthur Roe, Charles 
Bordner, Harrison Lesch, Theo- 
dore Albrecht, Kenneth Rule, Roy 
Hastings, Bill Milligan, and Meyers. 



Red And Green 

programs carried out the Christ- 
mas motive at the Sigma Chi dance 
which was held at the chapter 
house on Friday evening, Dec. 8. 
The woodsy tang of the evergreen 
decorations added zest to the par- 
ty. The chaperons were Prof, and 
Mrs. C. B. Malone and Mr. and 
Mrs. George Allebrand. 



A Christmas Present 

The members of Gamma Phi 
Beta and their guests enjoyed a 
semi-formal Christmas dance which 
was held at Stratton Park Inn on 
Saturday evening, Dec. 9. The 
highlight of the party was the pre- 
sentation of a beautiful Gamma 
Phi ring to the chapter advisor, 
Mrs. Ralph Gilmore. The chaper- 
ons for the evening were Dean and 
Mrs. W. V. Lovitt, Prof, and Mrs. 
C. B. Malone, and Prof, and Mrs. 
R. J. Gilmore. 



Ropes Of Evergreen 

and silver stars, combined with 
three decorated Christmas trees, 
added a Noel atmosphere to the 
Phi Gamma Delta semi-formal 
dance which was held on Friday 
evening, Dec. 8. The silver tone 
was carried out in the programs, 
which had the fraternity crest on 
the cover. The chaperons were 
Dr. and Mrs. W. C. Service and 
Mr. and Mrs. Jack Dern. 



Christmas Festivities 

will be culminated tonight with 
two pre-vacation parties. The Kap- 
pa Kappa Gamma chapter will en- 
tertain at a formal dinner-dance to- 
night. The guests will meet at 
Briarhurst Inn for dinner, and from 
there proceed to the Kappa house 
for dancing, where a big surprise 
is scheduled to occur during inter- 
mission. 



Sale ! 

Hollywood -Maid 

Silk Lingerie 




Slips 

— straight or V-top 

Gowns 

— 54 inches long 

Pajamas 

— One and two-piece 



Chemise 
Panties 
Petticoats 
Dance Sets 



From the' "undie-world of the movies" 
come these Hollywood-made pure silk 
garments to make the loveliest of gifts. 
Strictly tailored styles for your "man- 
nish" friends, or dainty lace-adorned 
femininities. In white, tea rose and pink. 

SECOND FLOOR 




Replacement 

Price Will 

Be $2.95 



ffi^SbMb* 



THE DENTAN 
PRINTING CO. 




COLORADO SPRINGS 

'/printers 






THE TIGER 



Friday, December 15, 19331 



Bachelor "New Deal" DANCE 



Broadmoor Nite Club FRIDAY, DECEMBER 15th 



JOHNNY METZLER'S ORCHESTRA 



Draw for Admissioi 

Couples 60c to $1.0i 

Stags 40c to 80 

Plus 10c Ta: 



sehwic: 



ELECTRIC CO. 



Price is uniform 

IM in 1-8-1-1 10 E. Kiowa 

Call Main 939, Rear 15 E. Bijou H. A. Thompson 



n i-i iim nm PHOTOGRAPHS 

Quality Master Cleaners The Gift that oni yy oucan give 

Only one QuaUty and the 0fficial Photographer, C. C. Nugget 

PAYTON STUDIO 

30 S. Tejon Phone M. 477-J 



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Daily and Sunday 
20c per week 



Combination 
35c per week 



Colorado College 

TEXT BOOKS 

AND SUPPLIES 

C. C. and Fraternity 

Stationery 

Laundry Bags — $2.00 Each 

Murray Drug Co. 

Across From the Campus 



WE WASH 
EVERYTHING 
WITH 
IVORY SOAP 

THINK 
WHAT THAT 

MEANS 



C/n 




earl 



LAUNDRY 

Phones M. 1085-1086 



COLORADO COLLEGE 






Palmer Hall entrance 



"IN STEP WITH THE MARCH OF TIME" 

Since 1874 outstanding among the 
highest ranking colleges of the 
country for its close super- 
vision of students, thor- 
oughness of training, and 

healthful location, 
COLORADO COLLEGE 
again steps for- 
ward in the a- 

doption of 
a New PLAN 

permitting 
greater freedom 
in choice of sub- 
jects under expert 
guidance to insure the 
best procedure in fields 
of concentration. A LIBERAL 
ARTS COLLEGE, C. C. offers com- 
plete foundational courses for 
advanced study. For catalog write 




Palmer Hall portico 



William D. Copeland, Secretary, 

Colorado College, 

Colorado Springs, Colorado. 



C. B. HERSHEY, A. M., ED. D., Acting President 



ail 







Colorado Qollege 



presents 




□ D □ D 



in 



n n 



Magna Pan Pa 



n 



a a 



Issued each week during the academic year. Entered at the »ost Office at Colorado Spring! aa Second-Claai Matter. 



THE TIGER 



Friday, January 5, 1934 



It adds something to the 
Taste and makes them Milder 




For your Convenience 



WHEN YOU GRADUATE 

To pass your bar. medical, dental, teach- 
ing, or other professional and state ex- 
aminations, you will have to review three 
or four years' notes. With ABC Shorthand, 
learned in 12 easy lessons, you can take 
accurate notes and be adequately prepared 
for all examinations. Get a copy at 

Pikes Peak Book & Stationery Co. 



TEXACO 

SUPER SERVICE 
ONE STOP STATION 



WASHING— GREASING 

TIRE REPAIRING 

FIRESTONE TIRES & TUBES 

UNDER MANAGEMENT 

OF BOB PHELPS 

SOUTHEAST CORNER CUCHARAS 

& SOUTH NEVADA AVE. 




Pack Bags 
Laundry Bags 
Hikers Supplies 

THE OUTWEST 
TENT and AWNING CO. 



M. 1261 



18 E. Kiowa 



To Maintain 
A Payroll in 
Colorado Springs 




COAL/ 

Phone Main 577 







EUROPEAN 
WINE CELLAR 



SOMETHING like the method of 
ageing fine wines is used in ageing 
the tobaccos for Chesterfield. 

The picture you see here was taken 
inside one of our modern storage ware- 
houses where the tobaccos for Chester- 
field are put away. 

There are about four and one-half 
miles of these Liggett & Myers ware- 
houses filled with thousands of casks of 
Domestic and Turkish tobaccos, most 
of it lying there ageing and mellowing 
for Chesterfield cigarettes. 

It takes just about three years to age 
the tobacco for your Chesterfields. 

Everything that money can buy 
and that science knows about that 
can make a cigarette that's mild' 
er, a cigarette that tastes better, 
is used in making Chesterfields. 



Modern storage ware- 
house for Chesterfield 
tobacco 



the cigarette that's MILDER • the cigarette that TASTES BETTER 



© 1934, Liggett & Myers Tobacco Co. 



^ "INN" 

ACROSS FROM MURRAY'S 



Strachan's 

SWEET SHOP 

Bijou and Nevada 



IRA C. DUGAN 

Jeweler and Optometrist 

Fine Watch and Clock Repairing 

Eyes Examined — Glasses Fitted 

— Lenses Duplicated — 

Phone Main 1702-J t N. Tajan Si. 



VOLUME XXXVI 



THE TIGER 



COLORADO COLLEGE WEEKLY NEWS-MAGAZINE 



Number 14 



♦ e A M P u 



College Eternal 

Following a one week illness of 
influenza, Dr. Archer Butler Hul- 
bert, 60, COLORADO COLLEGE 
professor of history and director of 
the Stewart Commission on Western 
History died Christmas Eve at his 
home, 14 E. Fontanero St. 

Nationally known as the author 
of Atlantic Monthly's $5000 prize 
novel of 1931, "Forty Niners", Dr. 
Hulbert was an outstanding author- 
ity on early American history, and 
had co-authored "Zebulon Pike's 
Arkansas Journal". 




DR. ARCHER B. HULBERT 

"The End of the Turquoise Trail" 
Chairman of the historic high- 
^ways division of the National High- 
^■ays association, Dr. Hulbert was 
archaeologist for the Ohio State 
Historical society, a member of 
Royal Geographic society, Pittsburg 
Economics club, and Phi Beta Kap- 
pa. 

^ Dr. Hulbert came to COLORADO 
COLLEGE in 1920 from Claremont 
college, California. Married to a 
former faculty member here, Mrs. 
Dorothy Printup Hulbert, Dr. Hul- 
bert is survived by his widow and 
two small children. 



Would Be Artists 

will find located directly over the 
fireplace in Colburn Library a shelf 
of books which will aid the artisti- 
cally talented students in lines of 
music, sculpturing, painting and 
writing. 



Magna Pan Pan 

in the true sense of the word, 
with the additions of a unit show 
idea, specialty acts, master-of- 
ceremonies, new lighting effects 
and a transformation of the Per- 
kins platform into a stage worthy 
of a vaudeville, should combine to 
make this year's show without com- 
parison in the history of the school. 

Advance notices indicate that 
acts are of a decidedly better qual- 
ity than has been the case in the 
past, and the fact that Koshare's 
Arthur G. Sharp, Jr., is rehearsing 
them for polish should add much 
to the performance. Koshare's 
stage director Jimmy O'Brien, 
assistant director Johnny Craig and 
a battery of assistants from the 
dramatic club including Chuck 
Strang electrician, are building the 
stage and sets in a manner to lend 
a professional touch to the techni- 
cal background. 

Music will be furnished by John- 
ny Metzler with between-the-acts 
specialty numbers featuring "Jump- 
ing" Joe Rustin, Dave Griffith, 
Jack Kintz and surprise performers 
with talent-to-spare. The biggest 
and best Pan Pan in college his- 
tory, Monday night 7:30 p. m. at 
Perkins hall, for the admission price 
of fifteen cents. 



Alumni 

Pueblo alumni of COLORADO 
COLLEGE will hold a meeting Jan. 
10, with W. T. "Bully" Van de 
Graaff, football coach, and Prof. 
H. E. Mathias of the geology de- 
partment and high school visitor as 
speakers. 

A rally of alumni, parents of stu- 
dents and students, who are able 
to be present, will be held in La 
Junta, Jan. 12. A number of the 
members of the faculty and others 
from Colorado Springs plan to at- 
tend. 



Interesting Alumni 
Chemistry Meeting 

Prof. F. W. Douglas of the chem- 
istry department attended the meet- 
ing of the International association 
for the advancement of science 
which was held in Chicago June 
19-23. 

Three Nobel Prize winners were 
present and five winners of the 
Gibbs prizes. Among the notables 
were Niels Bohr, originator of the 
Bohr theory of atomic structure; 
F. W. Ashton, isotope expert, and 
Fred Allison, discoverer of the new 
element, Alabamine, 



Brain Trust 

Quaker Dr. W. Lewis Abbott, 
professor of economics and Sociol- 
ogy, left December 27 for Washing- 
ton to assume duties with Roose- 
velt's brain trust. 




DR. LEWIS W. ABBOTT 

Brain Trust - - 

Through contacts with Colorado's 
Senator Costigan and Mrs. Grace 
Abbot, director of Children's Bur- 
eau of the federal government the 
appointment was made. His work 
will be in a joint committee of the 
agriculture and labor departments. 

Of Quaker parentage, he spent 
his youth in Pennsylvania, graduat- 
ed from the University of Pennsyl- 
vania in 1911 with an A. B. degree. 
In 1920 he received his Ph. D. De- 
gree. He was professor of econom- 
ics and sociology at Hamline Uni- 
versity until 1920 when he became 
a member of the COLORADO COL- 
LEGE faculty. In 1927 he became 
head of his department. 

He has authored many books, in- 
cluding "Competition and Combina- 
t ; on in the Wholesale Grocery 
Trade" and elaborated with B. A. 
Mautner on "Child Labor and Farm 
I ife in the Arkansas Valley of 
Colorado." 



Cap and Gown 

Tuesday seniors parade to chap- 
el wearing traditional graduation 
garb on the annual insignia day. 
Seniors meet in Palmer at 10 
o'clock to form the parade line to 
p.o to the chapel where Dr. C. B. 
Hershey, acting president, gives 
the address. 

Insignia day was begun at 
COLORADO COLLEGE back in 
1896, and on this occasion the 
seniors make their first appearance 
in caps and gowns. 

Engaged 

Miss Loretta Kekeisen, 34, Phi 
Beta Kappa, recently announced 
her engagement to Hubert E. Jones 
of Colorado Springs. 



Miss Janice Greenwood, 

18, COLORADO COLLEGE 
sophomore died Thursday, Decem- 
ber 21 at the home of her parents, 
Mr. and Mrs. E. F. Greenwood, 
1715 N. Tejojn street after a pro- 
longed illness of cancer. Funeral 
services were held at the Swan 
drawing room December 23 with 
Dean McMurtry officiating. John 
Mihalick, Claron Swan, Don Glid- 
den, Robert Slate, and Lauren 
Chaney acted as pallbearers. 




JANICE GREENWOOD 

Chapter Grand 
Miss Greenwood attended Colo- 
rado Springs high school before en- 
tering COLORADO COLLEGE in 
the fall of 1932 and was prominent 
member of Gamma Phi Beta sor- 
ority and Koshare. 



Fascism Discussed 

At the meeting of the Interna- 
tional Relations club on Wednes- 
day evening Mr. Gabore, the 
Italian Consul in Denver, gave an 
informal talk on some of the main 
intellectual factors which have in- 
fluenced the present government of 
Italy. Mr. Gabor's vivid manner of 
presentation, coupled with the 
spectacular nature of his subject, 
made the evening very provacative 
of thought. 

The main thesis presented was 
that class conflict is inevitable, and 
that the only possible remedy for 
this situation is a dictatorship 
which will combine the conflicting 
classes into a compact nation. Ac- 
cording to Mr. Gabore, Fascism as 
practiced in Italy and Germany is 
the only form of social organization 
which can accomplish that end. 



College Rackets 

are a thing of the past according 
to Dean McMurtry in his discussion 
of a magazine article entitled "End 
of College Rackets" in Chapel 
Tuesday. "The gate to life is closed 
to the unprepared college student, 
college rackets are at an end, and 
students must learn to be clear 
thinkers." In starting the new year 
we should endeavor to attain this 
goal," said Dean McMurtry. 



THE TIGER 



Friday, January 5, 1934 




Editor 



LEW CROSBY 



Business Manager E. F. STAPLETON 

EDITORIAL STAFF 

Editors: Managing Editor, Bob Johnson; Campus Editor. Joseph Lowe; 
Sports Editors, Harold Marlowe, John Bicknell ; Society Editor, Alice Her- 
som ; Makeup Editor, Martin Legere ; Pictorial Editor, David Dentan ; Ex- 
change Editor. John Dickey ; News Editors, Miller Stroup, Edith Weaver, 
Pes Swan, Albert Stubblefield, Fritz Baker; A. W. S., Ernestine Stroup: 
W. A. A., Louie Marie Mason. 

Society staff — Luzilla Eubank, Mildred Fritchle, Muriel McClanahan, 
Sarah Mclntyre, Caroline Morrison, Lyda Roark, Sally Tompkins, Jane 
Walker, Imogene Young. Makeup staff — Edith Gaylord. Exchange staff — 
Charles Macdonald. Sports staff — Ronald Rolph, James Ransom, Dick Al- 
son, David Waters. Proof readers — Lucy Blackman, Frances Stevenson. 
News staff — Jake Johnson. David Dentan. Gilbert Baylis, Alice Sutton, La- 
Rue Wiley. Nanet Meredith, Claire Sweany, Elvira Cortellini, Ruth Mary 
Webster. Esther Alexander. Charles Dewing, Ken Hall, Jennie Conway, 
Mark Schreiber, Marybel Poer, Ruth Liverman, Margaret Stewart, Ann 
Daniels, Conrad Brown, Dale Ashbaugh, Frank Johnson, Jean James, Doro- 
thy Elston. Helen Miller. Ellen Perry, Susan Braerton, Dick Hall, Emma 
Louise Jordan, Virginia Botsford, Roberta McKay. 



+ In Memory 

of one of the best-known and best-loved members of our college 
faculty who has journeyed, to use his own words, to "The End of the 
Turquoise Trail." His passing has taken from us an inspiration in his 
own right and has lost us an instructor whose great learning was bal- 
anced by a great and sympathetic understanding. In a larger sense 
however, he can never leave us. He will always live in memory as the 
personification of gentility, good-will and charming personality. And, 
when the final roll-call is read of those who have made this world bet- 
ter for their living in it — inscribed in letters of gold will be the name 
of Archer Butler Hulbert. 



The following is a complete list 
of books edited by Dr. Archer But- 
ler Hulbert from 1901 to 1933: 

Andrew Craiaie and the Scioto 
associates — 1913. 

Roone's Wilderness Road— 1903. 

Braddock's Road and Three 
Relative papers — 1903.' 

The Cumberland Road— 1904. 

Fortv-niners, the Chronicles of 
the California Trail — 1931. 

Frontiers, The Genius of Ameri- 
can Nationality— 1929. 

The Future of Road Making in 
America — A Symposium — 1905. 

The Great American Canals — 
1904. 

Historic Highways of America. 

The Increasing Debt of History 
to Science 1920. 

Indian Thoroughfares — 1902. 

Message of the Mound Builders 
to 20th Century— 1913. 

Methods and Operation of the 
Sciotic Group of Speculators — 
1915. 

Military Roads of the Mississipi- 
pi Basin, the Conquest of the Old 
Northwest— 1904. 

The Niagara River— 1908. 

Ohio in the Time of the Confed- 
eration — 1918. 



The Old Glade Road— 1903. 
The Old National Road, A Chap- 
ter of American Expansion — 1901. 
The Paths of Inland Commerce 

—1921. 

Paths of Mountain-Building In- 
dians and Great Game Animals — 

1902. 

Pioneer Roads and Experiences 
of Travelers — 1904. 

Portage Paths: The Keys of the 
Continent — 1903. 

Soil : Its Influence on the His- 
tory of the United States, with 
Special Reference to Migration and 
the Scientific Study of Local His- 
tory— 1930. 

Southwest on the Turquoise 
Trail— 1933. 

United States History— 1923. 

Washington's Road, the First 
Chaplei of the Old Freeh War — 
1903. 

Waterways of Westward Expan- 
sion, the Ohio River and its Tribu- 
taries— 1903. 



(NSFA) — Frank Carideo, form- 
er All-American quarterback at 
Notre Dame, has failed to win a 
single major game during his first 
two years as head coach of the 
University of Missouri. — Aquin. 



Up From 1916— 

COLORADO COLLEGE'S Pan 
Pan has always been one of t h e 
year's big fun affairs, with every- 
body in college there for a big 
laugh and nobody about the dra- 
matic technique seen during the 
evening. Traditionally given the 
last Monday night before the 
Christmas recess starts, this year's 
Pan Pan was unavoidably post- 
poned until next Monday. 

Back in 1916 a dinner was giv- 
en along with the vaudeville and 
to judge from this account in the 
TIGER for Dec. 12, 1916, it must 
have been the well-known nuts: 

"The dinner will be served 
promptly at 6:30 in the huge gym 
which will be decorated in the col- 
lege colors, pennants, lights, etc. 
The tables will be tastely arranged 
with kinnikinnick and cedar. After 
dinner the scene of entertainment 
will be shifted to Cogswell Thea- 
ter. Last year the Pan-Pan was 
given in the gym in connection 
with the dinner but the clearing of 
the tables caused so much confu- 
sion, that it was thought better to 
go to Cogswell this time. 

"Stub Davis is chairman of the 
committee in charge of the big 
feed, and it is reported that the 
ranchers around the city have tak- 
en out turkey insurance for protec- 
tion. Stub says, however, there 
will be enough turkey for every- 
one just the same. 

"In the first place, the frosh will 
give a return engagement of 'A 
Mid-summer's Night Dream'. This 
extravaganza is a traversity upon 
Silly Waspespeare's brainstorm and 
was enacted for the first time and 
with the original cast when the 
class 'rambled in the lifted lands'. 

"Next the sophomores will have 
their fling. Rest assured that they 
will not let the lowly class put any- 
thing over them, so some entertain- 
ment may be expected. Al Brom- 
field will follow with a few imita- 
tions of Harry Lauder. 

"Caj and Motten will officiate as 
yell-leaders and will endeavor to 
raise the latent oep in the student 
bodv, Nuf sed!" 

Due to World War activities 
there was a three year lapse in 
Pan Pan shows so the next record 
we have is of December 16. 1919: 

"Pandora with her PANlher and 
all the little PANS arraved in the 
most fitting PANoplies of the stage 
will hold forth next Thursday eve- 
ning in PANtheon (Cossitt gymna- 
sium) for the benefit of the suffer- 
ing students. The show will be, ac- 
cording to all the obtained infor- 
mation, a PANorama of PANicky 
PANtomime which will make the 
PANcratium of the ancient Greeks 
and the PANtaloons of old Italy 
and the most modern PANtages 
look like unto the proverbial thir- 



ty cents. 

"This is not a PANegyric, nor 
is it PANegyrical, nor is the writer 
a Pangrist endeavoring to PAN- 
egyrize. It is a simple announce- 
ment that next Thursday will bring 
to us the greatest PAN-PAN in the 
history of C. C." 

In 1922 a cane fight between the 

freshmen and sophomores was a 

feature of that year's Pan-P?n. 

Among the prize acts were "The 

Pieing of Mushy Mike Moran," 

I "The C. C. Follies", "Prof. Pray- 

| moor Physics", and "Prof. Willie 

! Willie WaHoo". 

A Cossitt dinner dance to be at- 
tended by forty couples apparently 
took the place of Pan-Pan in 1923. 
In 1924 Bill Hall, brother of Dick 
Hall one of this year's managers, 
was an assistant manager of the 
show. Herb Stockdale was man- 
ager, no admission was charged, 
and Hypatia presented the "1925 
Follies in Training". 

Dr. C. C. Mierow was inaugu- 
rated president of COLORADO 
COLLEGE in 1 925 and that year 
the "audience was in a continuous 
uproar of laughter from the open- 
j ing of the curtain for the first act 
until the last jiggling Charleston 
dancer had disappeared from the 
stage shortly after ten-o'clock. 

"In addition to the creditable 
acts presented by the organizations 
represented a skit was presented by 
Arthur Sharp and Douglas McHen- 
drie". 

Coming to COLORADO COL- 
LEGE in 1926, Bully Van de Graaff 
saw his first Pan-Pan, which in- 
cluded a dance act by the Far- 
Famed Totsy Dancers. There are 
j unlimited possibilities in this act 
I and anything may be expected. It 
I will be built around a dance com- 
posed of the Waltz Clog, Spanish 
Tango, the Salome." 

In those days the faculty put on 

an act : "The faculty has promised" 

I to bud forth and present an act 

I that will stand as a model to all 

would-be performers for Magna 

! Pan Pans to come." 

An admission price of ten cents 

'was first charged in 1927 when 

I Johnny Metzler and his "Five Mu- 

I sic Maniacs" amused the public 

I who also saw the program "go over 

j with great gusto. The Sigma Chis 

1 presented rather a shady act. Ago 

and Today, yesterday and this 

morning were dwelt upon and 

played upon by the Minervas. A 

touching drama of flaming hearts 

and guns was presented by the 

Fijis." 

Thus through the years each 
Pan-Pan has been bigger than the 
preceding one and by far the best 
in the history of the college and 
tomorrow night promises to be no 
exception ! 



Friday, January 5, 1934 



THE TIGER 



3 



KEYHOLE 
EEPER 



. 



Hi-ho everybody, hi-ho. Ho-ho, 
li-hi, wotta Christmas, wotta New 
ifears, wotta week, wotta school, 
,votta term paper - - nuts, but 
something has to be said to fill the 
;pace the printer saves every week 
:or this tripe. It's driving me crazy 
Mid somebody says are you going 
o the basketball game tonight and 
[ says no not with a philosophy 
:est tomorrow and then another 
uug explains the spinsters' philos- 
jphy on watching a hen being run 
Dver by a car after being chased 
jy a rooster and the typewriter 
man comes with a beautiful type- 
mter in green and green Kappa 
Kappa Gamma blue and blue 
brown and brown Gamma Phi Beta 
.vonder who has black and black 
nid correspondent Z3 comes in 
,vith a story about a joint Sig Chi 
D hi Gam dance in Wichita to 
vvhich some poor gal came wear- 
ing an evening dress on which 
were a Phi Delt pledge pin and her 
sorority pledge button very very 
sad potatoes evidently this London- 
er Bailey is quite a kick teaching 
history very amusing with his 
British humor, haircut, and north 
English accent Pinkie Schwartz's 
new hair-do is becoming she re- 
minds me of Pueblo and the Con- 
gress which has Metzler dances 
everv Friday night now and to 
which were many local citizens last 
week Jack Conley being there with 
Ressie Blackmail as Martha's big 
ja-ja w,as home from K. U. and 
Nadine Kent and Bud Ream and 
Lamasure and Pitts and oh a whole 
mob and so many at the Broad- 
moor on New Year's Eve looking 
like silly citizens indeed Bud Udick 
^.suddenly at Beth-El with a gone 
appendix and Anna Daniels wowed 
^k in Pueblo Christmas week citi- 
zens complain that it's always the 
sam^ names in here but what can 
you do you can't just put in names 
to give people breaks when they 
don't do anything but maybe some 
would just as soon not crash the 
ink Bemis special correspondent 
K4 who sits next to me in chapel 
wants me to put in hello every- 
body but Platte well you could fool 
me K 4 also says that Lina Smith 
came in in the early morning after 
a New Year's Eve party just in 
time to pack her bag and catch the 
train taking her from Grand Junc- 
tion to Colorado Springs and K 4 
must have the old zeal as she says 
Penny Ante Penland honeymooned 
to California during vacation an or 
chid to Brain-truster Abbott and a 
scallion to Kenny Markle just on 
general obstreperousness and Sally 



Tompkins is considering have a 
mole on her face removed hear 
that that Tommy Bozzy Scott 
planted his fraternity pin on a Den- 
ver gal at Christmas Betas Finger 
and Gleason are modeling their bi- 
ceps etc. at the art academy Board- 
man Robinson said Gleason would 
be a good model if you could see 
through the brush meaning hair on 
I his chest etc. Betty Reid is one of 
J Bemis's biggest eaters Lucille 
j Hampton who's Mrs. Mullet's sec- 
I retary is keeping watch of Bemis 
treasury and informs boarders when 
they eat over their money's worth 
Loring Lennox and Maidie Roth- 
gerber are quite that way by now 
and Ray Lowell and Peggy Simp- 
son are a little and oh it's such a 
lovely day Dick Hall dancing with 
Elizabeth Evans got among the last 
three couples at the Cosmo's col- 
lege dance contest Lucy Blackmail 
always looks so tired K 4 also 
came through with something else 
but I lost the dope sheet and don't j 
remember what it was oh dear dear j 
gracious what a sad sad colym this 
turned out to be oh yes Bob Mc- 
Clintock pushing Kenny Garret in 
a trunk cart around the Broadmoor . 
ballroom floor New Year's Eve. 



BXeHANGrB 



A professor at Stanford univer- 
sity in addressing a co-eds' meet- 
ing, told the girls: "You silly co- 
eds come to school to join a sor- 
ority so that you can marry some- 
thing in a fraternity." 
••• ••« ••• 

We want a fumble. Colgate has 
a series of plays making it neces- 
sary for eight men to handle the 
ball. Dr. Bryan, president of the 
university is also part-time coach 
of the team. 



Yes, sir — down at Arkansas U., 
four of the varsity regulars are 
married men. Can you imagine a 
coach getting a last word at them? 
And man, oh man, what happens 
to one of 'em if he misses a crucial 
pass — or somethin'? 

— Doane Owl. 



Nugget Pictures 

j The importance of having pic- 
tures taken for the 1934 Pikes 
Peak Nugget is being greatly 
I stressed by Editor Emma Louise 
Jordan and Manager Ben Carson. 
No definite date has been set yet 
i as the limit of time, but as fully 
two months are required in setting 
J up the book after all of the pictures 
j are in, these must be taken within 
the next six weeks if the Nugget 
! can come out in the latter part of 
April. 

This year, in order to satisfy each 

| member of the student body with 

a choice of photographers, three 

i studios have arranged to make the 

pictures. Paytons at 30 S. Tejon, 

the Wagner-Fults studio in the 

i Burns Bldg., and the Emery Studio 

I at 1 7 E. Cache la Poudre have all 

: made a price of $2. for four sit- 

I tings and all pictures needed for 

j the annual, with a dozen finished 

I photographs for the additional cost 

'of $1.75. 

In place of giving a $5. prize to 
the organization having the great- 
; est percentage of pictures taken, 
two prizes are being awarded of 
$5. each, to the fraternity and 
1 sorority which are first to have all 
of their pictures taken, or to the 
I ones having the highest percent- 
ages. 



Girls will be boys these days ac- 
cording to an orthopedic expert. 
Their feet are two sizes larger than 
they were 20 years ago. This in- 
crease in their understanding is 
probably due to the fact that they 
are trying to fill men's shoes. In 
some colleges the women are taking 
up football. In the future "the 
skin you love to touch" will be the 
"pigskin". 

— Heightsonian, Loretta Heights. 
■•* .«. ■•. 

From one end of extremes to 
the other: The University of Wash- 
ington has a 13-year old prodigy, 
while at Hunter College, New York, 
a 72 -year old co-ed has enrolled. 

— Rocky Mt. Collegian. 
.•. .«. . . 

Butler university is offering a 
course in the art of staying mar- 
ried. 

•o* ••• ••• 

From Santa Monica J.C. exam 
papers: A taxidermist is a kind of 
thick fog, a toreador is a really bad 
storm. Pooling — a practice in- 
dulged in by young men about 
town. 



A recent notice on the bulletin 
board of Brooklyn Polytech read: 
"cheer leaders wanted; must be 
intelligent, neat in appearance, 
honest, and diligent." 

A week later, the first notice was 
taken down anl the following sub- 
stituted: "Cheer leaders wanted; 
no qualifications." 



A speech professor at Florida 
State College entered his afternoon 
class with a speech disorder, he 
walked to the board and wrote, "I 
know when I am defeated. Will see 
you next week. Good Luck." 



When the dean of Gettysburg 
college left a dance recently, he 
found his car occupied by a ro- 
mantic young couple. Tipping his 
hat graciously, the dean proceeded 
to walk home with his wife. 

Why in tarnation they brought 
this up I don't know. Do you 
know the seven "ations," they that 
constitute the metamorphosis of 



the typical student? Registration, 
contemplation, procrastination, pre- 
varication, examination, consterna- 
tion, and probation. 

'•• .»• ••• 

The catalogue of Oklahoma A. 
& M. college lists a course in 
"Nut Culture." Lest this lead to am- 
biguity, this explanation is includ- 
ed: "The study of pecans, wal- 
nuts, etc." 

••• ••• ••• 

At the University of Nevada, 

seniors only are privileged to wear 

sombreros and moustaches. 
.«. .«. .«. 

So many countries are represent- 
ed at Cornell university that t h e 
students have formed clubs com- 
prised of students from their own 
countries. Among these are Arab- 
ian, Japanese, Filipino, Chinese, 
and Hindustan societies. 



A gigolo's paradise: Detroit uni- 
versity has an enrollment of 77 
men and 3543 women. 

— Los Angeles Junior Collegian. 



They tossed him out of the Pur- 
due library for this. 

"Hey, count to 1 real fast, and 
then answer my question." 

"One, two, three, four, five, six, 
seven, eight, nine, ten." 

"What's Mickey Mouse a cat or 
a dog?" 

"A cat — I mean a dog — I 
mean — well what the (try it.). 



Will someone solve a mystery, 

For we would like to know: 

Why slow girls get home faster, 

And fast ones get home slow? 

— Iowa College Eye. 
••• ••• ••• 

Students at Connecticut State 

College demand half royalties on 

examination papers which are sold 

to humor publications. 

.»* .e. ••• 

A new fraternity has appeared 
on the Campus of Texas Christian 
university. Although the social 
group has not adopted Greek let- 
ters, the letters "P-K" appear up- 
on the organizations pin. Created 
by students whose fathers are min- 
isters, the group is known as 
"Preachers Kids." Members may 
organize a national fraternity from 

this nucleus. 

-»- ■•■ ■•■ 

Names mean plenty at Fordham 
university. Father Deane is dean, a 
Father Whalen acts as dean of dis- 
cipline. Mr. Shouten is in charge 
of debating, and Mr. Vokal (pro- 
nounced vocal) is in charge of the 
glee club. 

••• •** ••• 

A co-ed surprised a journalism 
class at the University of Wiscon- 
sin by wearing a sleeveless vest- 
jacket made of pennants from col- 
leges all over the United States. 
— Colo-Wo-Co. 



THE TIGER 



BISSEL'S PHARMACY 

HENKT E. COPELAND, Prop. 

A Tiger Booster 

Tel. M. 980 Comer Dale and Weber 

PROMPT DELIVERY 



WE WASH 
EVERYTHING 
WITH 
IVORY SOAP 

THINK 
WHAT THAT 

MEANS 



C/i. 




carl 



LAUNDRY 

Phones M. 1085-1086 



PHOTOGRAPHS 

The Gift that only you can give 
Official Photographer, C. C. Nugget 

PAYTON STUDIO 

30 S. Tejon Phone M. 477-J 

Quality "Master"Cleaners 

Only one Quality and the 
Price is uniform 

M in 1-8-1 -1 10 E. Kiowa 

H. A. Thompson 



Colorado College 

TEXT BOOKS 

AND SUPPLIES 

C. C. and Fraternity 

Stationery 

Laundry Bags — $2.00 Each 

Murray Drug Co. 

Across From the Campus 



E 



ELECTRIC CO. 

Call Main 939, Rear 15 E. Bijou 



Have your Nugget photo- 
graphs made now and avoid 
the rush 

aKenKry 

STUDIO 

Fine Portraiture 
Across from the campus 




Friday, January 5, 193 



NOTICE 



Interfraternity Basketball 

Schedule 

Tuesday, Jan. 9 — 

Phi Delta Theta vs. Delta Al- 
pha Phi 
Kappa Sigma vs. Phi Gamma 
Delta 
Thursday, Jan. 11 — 

Phi Delta Theta vs. Independents 
Sigma Chi vs. Kappa Sigma 
Tuesday, Jan. 16 — 

Phi Gamma Delta vs. Delta Al- 
pha Phi 
Beta Theta Pi vs. Phi Delta 
Theta 
Thursday, Jan. 18 — 

Sigma Chi vs. Delta Alpha Phi 
Phi Gamma Delta vs. Beta Theta 
Pi 
Tuesday, Jan. 30 — 

Kappa Sigma vs. Independents 
Phi Delta Theta vs. Sigma Chi 
Thursday, Feb. 1 — 

Sigma Chi vs. Independents 
Phi Gamma Delta vs. Phi Delta 
Theta 
Tuesday, Feb. 6 — 

Delta Alpha Phi vs. Independents 
Kappa Sigma vs. Beta Theta Pi 
Thursday, Feb. 8 — 

Beta Theta Pi vs. Delta Alpha 

Phi 
Phi Delta Theta vs. Kappa Sig- 
ma 
Tuesday, Feb. 13 — 

Beta Theta Pi vs. Independents 
Delta Alpha Phi vs. Kappa Sig- 
ma 



TIGER ROARS 




Some Wins — and Some Defeats 

were the results of games played 
by the Tigers during the Christmas 
holidays. Several non-conference 
games were played with some of 
the best teams in and out of the 
state and the Tigers played a very 
creditable brand of ball. On Mon- 
dav, Dec. 18 the C. C. lads bowed 
before a fighting B. Y. U. squad 
?nd left the hardwood with a 41- 
27 defeat staring them in the face. 
The following night, they lost a 
close game to the University of 
Utah by a score of 28-30. At Pro- 
vo the next night, the favored pen- 
nant contenders, Utah Aggies 
smothered the locals by a 44-22 
score. The squad then disbanded 
for the Santa Claus festivities and 
returned to the hardwood on Dec. 
27 and lost an interesting contest 
to the hightly advertised Piggly 
Wiggly team hailing from Denver. 
The score of the contest was C. C. 

18 Pigs 33. 

Friday night of last week, the 
Tigers upset the proverbial dope- 
bucket and sent the strong B. Y. U. 
squad home with a 31-38 defeat 
dangling from their belts. 



Vocational conferences for Si 
ior Women will be held at Ber 
hall the week beginning Jan. 8. 

Miss Anne Byrd Kennon will i 
as substitute for Miss East, who 1 
been called to other work. M 
Kennon was previously Director 
the Bureau of Collegiate Occu| 
tions in Denver and has been t 
ing personnel work in New Yc 
since 1929. 



All Seniors to take part in t 
Insignia Day exercises are to mi 
in rooms 21 and 22 in Palmer H 
with caps and gowns. 



All Sophomore women desiri 
to try out for the Colonial B a' 
meet in the McGregor gym, We 
Jan. 10, between 5 and 6 P. M. 



One-Sided Scores 

were the result of the inter- 
fraternity games played at Cossitt 
Tuesday. The Phi Gams trounced 
the Barbs by a score of 28 - 8, 
while the Sigma Chi Aggregation 
ran rough-shod over the Betas and 
piled up a 34-13 score. 

The final round of intramural 
play started Tuesday and will con- 
tinue throughout the remainder of 
January and February. 

High point men and outstanding 
performers of the games played 
were Christenson, Sigma Chi, Ran- 
som, Phi Gam, Hess, Independent, 
and Gross, Beta Theta Pi. 



Tomorrow night the Tigers re- 
turn to the polished floor and meet 
the Denver Athletic club in a re- 
turn engagement with the upstate 
team. Students will be admitted on 
the fourth extra in their blue 
books plus 25 cents. This is the 
last non-conference game of the 
season before the Bengals blow the 
lid off of their 1934 season when 
they encounter Denver University 
here next week. 

LET'S BACK THE TIGERS. 



"Arte Para 

Ligeramete Saber La Legua I 
auiga" presents very interests 
reading were you to drag out P 
magnifying glass. The book, writt 
in 1505, was published in New Yc 
in 1928. Some of the pages ha 
as many as nine reduced facsimi 
of the original pages. The letti 
are Arabic, making it illegible 
you. 

The book from which the LL 
putian facsimiles are taken is a n 
edition and would give heart thrc 
to the eye of any bibliophile. Tht 
are four reference cards for t 
book but to the average pers 
they are unintelligible. 



SHEFF & SOI 

SUPERIOR FORD SERVICE 



827 N. Tejon 



M. 1311 



News deluxe is now furnished the 
students of the University of Okla- 
homa by a large electric sign which 
flashes out the latest bulletins. 

— Doane Owl. 
••• -•« ••■ 

The Parenthesis Club, unique or- 
ganization at the State Teachers 
College in Trenton, N. J., is only 

open to bow-legged men. 
••• ••• •«• 

Excuses for oversleeping and 

missing 8 o'clocks are being done 

away with at Ohio University. Four 

band members will play reveille 

from the library steps to arouse late 

sleepers. 



"Driving without a license, ob- 
structing traffic and operating a 
trolley without a franchise," were 
the charges filed on a group of stu- 
dents at the Colorado School of 
Mines who were arrested recently 
while driving an ancient street car 
down the streets of the town, plas- 
tered with signs advertising their 

next football game. 

••• ••• .»• 

A student at Miami University 

went home and partially undressed 

before the sight of three sleeping 

girls reminded him that he had 

moved to another rooming house. 
••• ••• ••• 

A new college has been formed 

at Black Mountain, N. C. which 

will have no president and no clas- 

\ sification for undergraduates. 

— Los Angeles Junior Collegian 



Tiresfone 

ONE STOP 
SERVICE 



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for Winter Driving 



Complete Lubrication 

Motor Oils 

Batterie? and Repairing 

Firestone Anti-freeze 

Prestone and Alcohol 



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Texaco "Fire Chief" Gasoline 

"Red Head" Car Heaters 

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Phone M. 202 

4- 



iday, December 15, 1933 



THE TIGER 




On 

Candy 

Counters 

Every 

Place 



The Biggest Nickel's 
worth of GOOD Candy 
You Ever Bought. Try 
It! 



NAME YOUR 
OWN FIGURE I 

200 beau- 
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With 

DOLORES 
DEL RIO 

Gene Raymond 
Raul Roulien 
Ginger Rogers 
Fred Astairc 

Muit: by 
Vincent Youmani 



to by Edward Eliscu and Gus Kahn 
•ected by THOKNTON Fkeeiand 
'MAN C. COOPER, executive pro- 
:er. Louis Brock, associate producer. 

CO- RADIO Picture 

SATURDAY 





A Typewriter 

an Aid to Education 

The investment is small — 
payment as low as $4.00 a 
month may be made — and we 
carry every make machine. 




125 N. Tejon St. 
Phone Main 95 

mi iii i i i i ii i iiiiii iiiiii ii iii iin mmtl 



OCIAId 



SOCIAL CALENDAR 
Saturday, Jan. 6 — 

Delta Gamma subscription dance 
Monday, Jan. 8 — 

Pan Pan 
Tuesday, Jan. 9 — 

Euterpe 

A. W. S. board 
Wednesday, Jan. 10 — 

W. A .A. 
Friday, Jan. 12 — 

Kappa Sigma tea dance 

Beta Theta Pi dance 
Saturday, Jan. 13 — 

Kappa Alpha Theta dance 
Sunday, Jan. 14 — 



N. 



ewman c 



lub 



Cameras, Skates 

and skis were employed by a 
group of college hikers on a vaca- 
tion at Woodland Park. Dec. 31 
and Jan. 1 . The cameras were 
employed to record the AdAmAn 
club fireworks, the skates were used 
between falls on the ice, and skis 
were used on the slopes north of 
Woodland Park. Those attending 
included Coral Sherwood, Eleanor 
Hastings, Mary Jo Sparkman, Aud- 
rey Gill, Elpha Bowman, Norma 
Garrett, Arthur Roe, Charles Bord- 
ner, Richard Dickison, Robert 
Kennedy, Roy Hastings and Jo 
Dickison. Chaperons were Mr. and 
Mrs. E. R. Ehrman. 




CAMPUS CHIC 

This serviceable Christmas 
brought clothes to many on the 
campus. They are cute and inter- 
esting. Dodo Skidmore wears a new 
woven skirt of iron grey. It is dress- 
y with a black satin blouse and 
a saucy white bow at the throat. 
Her hat is a high black affair which 
perches jauntily over one eye. 

Helen Gilmore wears a beautiful 
semi-formal of red transparent vel- 
vet. It has a dazzling buckle of two 
mirrors. The sleeves are large at the 
shoulders, tight-fitting and long. 

Gratia Belle Blackmail is smart 
in an olive-green crepe with puffed 
sleeves gathered at the elbow and 
a high collar of pleated white 
satin. 

Carol Hurley wears a new sport 
coat of dark brown wool, rich in its 
simplicity. It has a stand-up collar 
and panelled sleeves. Broad shoul- 
ders give the new line. 



CHAPEL CALENDAR 
Tuesday, Jan. 9, 10:00 A. M.— 

Insignia Day — Academic Proces- 
sion 

Speaker: Dr. Hershey, Acting 
President. 



Carrie Co-Ed's Letter 

Dear Sis, 

Back to school again, to find that 
sorrow and sadness have visited 
our campus during vacation. The 
death of Dr. Archer Hulbert has 
left an empty place in our faculty 
that can not be filled, and Janice 
Greenwood's cheery smile will be 
missed by all who knew her. 

Most people come back to 
school to rest up from vacation, 
but I fooled myself this time, and 
came back full of vim, vigor, and 
vitality. Of course, the big ques- 
tion of the day is "What did you 
get for Christmas?" As far as I 
can see, everybody seemed to have 
had the same idea, and gave fra- 
ternity jewelry for gifts. You 
should see all the good looking fra- 
ternity rings around about! 

I hear that a number of the fra- 
ternities and sororities celebrated 
New Year's eve in their various 
ways. Some of the Kappas and 
their dates were seen on the west 
terrace of their lodge admiring the 
fireworks from the Peak. When 
they were over, the merrymakers 
went back in the lodge to resume 
work on a little wooden puzzle, 
that was about to drive everybody 
goofy. 

All the members of fraternities 
and sororities are hard at work on 
their acts for Pan Pan. Of course, 
no one will breathe a word of what 
the acts are going to be, but from 
the little bit that I have been able 
to ferret out, Pan Pan this year is 
going to be bigger and better than 
ever before, with some cosmopoli- 
tan surprises. I sneaked behind a 
Phi Delt this afternoon and heard 
him humming a most intriguing bit 
of melody. My curiosity is all 
aroused. 

The hoop stars are in action 
again under a new schedule — but 
nothing to do with the N.R.A. — 
at least as far as I know. The Var- 
sity basketball team starts its offi- 
cial season a week from tomorrow. 
I'm getting my vocal cords in 
training now for the big games by 
yelling my best at the Inter-frater- 
nity games. And you should hear 
me yell when I'm at my best! 

Since I still have to write my 
term paper that's due tomorrow at 
8:00, best I get to work, 

Literally yours, 

Carrie. 



* 

i 



••••••••••••.'«..•. «..•.-•>..• •»- 



WAGNER-FULTS 

STUDIO 

Have Your Picture Taken 
Now for the C. C. Nugget 

Official Photographer 

"Portraits That Please" 

Burns Bldg. 



■!•»•" 



•'••<••••..•..•..•.. 






SPECIAL SALE 

YOUNG MEN'S 

FINE OXFORDS 




SHOE FOR MEN' 

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Examine the quality of 
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C— 3302 



WULFFSHOECO. 

110 S. Tejon St. 



THE TIGER 



Friday, January 5, 193- 



+— 






The best way to tell of the 
beauty of Colorado, Stand- 
ley's Color Pictures, Hand- 
Colored — 35 cents up. 

H.L.Standley 

PHOTOGRAPHER 

224 No. Tejon St. 

Colorado Springs 



— * 



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Say Boys — 

Campbell's 

Barber 
at Shop 

109 East Pikes Peak Ave. 



IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIMMIIIIIIINIIIIIIIIIilllllllllllllllllllllllllllllMIII 




Coburn Library 

COLORADO COLLEGE 

Colorado Springs, Colorado 
Fully accredited Co-educational 

Adequate equipment and high standards of scholastic attainment 
make Colorado College one of the outstanding Liberal Arts Col- 
leges of the country. 

A large faculty makes possible an individual friendly guidance 
for each student. 

Thorough and interesting courses in the Schools of ARTS and 
SCIENCES, LETTERS and FINE ARTS, the NATURAL SCI- 
ENCES, and the SOCIAL SCIENCES develop his mind in prep- 
aration for purposeful effective living in the modern world. 

Unsurpassed climate, beautiful environment and the influence of 
a cultured community combine to make study at COLORADO 
COLLEGE a privilege. 

C. B. HERSHEY, A. M., ED. D., Acting President 



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Main 900 



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Phone Main 1288 



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Issued each week during the academic year. Entered at ih.'ost Office at Colorado Springs aa Second-Class Matter. 



THE TIGER 



Friday, January 12, 1934 




TWO YEARS IN 12 HOURS 

It takes about two years' time to learn 
the conventional shorthand methods, 
whereas ABC Shorthand can be mastered 
in only 12 hours' study. Convince your- 
self of this fact by examininK a copy of 
the ABC Shorthand for lecture and read- 
ing notes which is now selling for $1.00 at 

Pikes Peak Book & Stationery Co. 



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Jeweler and Optometrist 

Fine Watch and Clock Repairing 

Eyes Examined — Glasses Fitted 

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Phone Main 1702-J t N. Tejon St 



3LUME XXXVI 



THE TIGER 



COLORADO COLLEGE WEEKLY NEWS-MAGAZINE 



Number 15 



♦ e A M P u 



Lit And Nonsense" 

proved to be an interesting topic 
r the lovers of art as it was car- 
id out by Mr. Boardman Robin- 
n, director of the Broadmoor Art 
ademy and instructor in art at 
e Fountain School for boys, in 
s lecture at Perkins hall Tuesday 
ght. 




BOARDMAN ROBINSON 

"Art and Nonsense ..." 

Mr. Robinson has spent his life 
rawing, painting, cartooning and 
raveling. He studied art in Ameri- 
a, Canada, England and Paris and 
as worked in both America and 
urope. He has illustrated for 
»any of American leading news- 
apers and magazines and some of 
lis paintings adorn the walls of 
»ublic buildings in many of the 
;reat eastern cities. 



Jryn Mawr's 

classical archaeology professor 
ind more recently of the American 
school of classical studies in Greece 
/vill speak before the Colorado 
Springs chapter of the Archaeologi- 
cal Institute of America on Satur- 
day, in the pit of Palmer hall. Pro- 
fessor Rhys Carpenter's subject will 
concern "The Lost Statues of the 
Parthenon". 

Dr. Carpenter is internationally 
known as a writer and an authority 
an classical archaeology and was 
selected as Norton lecturer of the 
Institute for the season of 1933 and 
1934, a distinctive honor conferred 
jpon comparatively few men. A 
jublic lecture, gratis. 



Honor 

I was brought to COLORADO 
-OLLEGE as the Modern Language 
Association invited Mrs. Anne vB. 
iutton to write a paper for their 
'nnual meeting. The paper, 
Teaching German by the Direct 
t/Iethod," was read before nation- 
illy known professors and linguists 
it the meeting held in the last week 
)f December in St. Louis. 



Embryo Economics 

With the price of gold hovering 
around $36 an ounce, and the 
monetary problem puzzling the 
nation; the trip of Alpha Kappa 
Psi through the Golden Cycle Re- 
fining mills next Tuesday should 
prove of stimulating interest to the 
members. Transportation to the 
mill will be provided to all those 
who meet at the West door of Pal- 
mer at 2:30 o'clock. 

Park Eckles, president of the 
business fraternity, has announced 
that initiation for the new members 
will be held in Denver Sunday in 
conjunction with the D. U. chapter. 



Drab for Accounting 

is one of the colors signifying 
scholastic distinction as worn on the 
hoods of the various instructors as 
they appear in their caps and 
gowns. 

In 1933 a movement arose to 
adopt specific color combinations 
which would be universal in all col- 
leges and universities in the coun- 
try. The Intercollegiate Bureau of 
Academic costume was established 
to further the movement, and col- 
ors were designated. The degree 
colors are in velvet. The college 
awarding the degree has its colors 
in silk on the reverse side. 

Each of the different professions 
have their color, such as arts and 
letters, white; law, purple; science, 
gold yellow; music, pink; dentistry, 
liiac; engineering, orange; library 
science, lemon; commerce and ac- 
countancy, drab; humanic, crim- 
son; public health, salmon pink; 
economics, copper; theology and 
divinity, scarlet; philosophy, blue; 
medicine, brown; pharmacy, olive; 
forestry, russet; veterinary science, 
gray; pedagogy, light blue; physi- 
cal education, sage green; oratory, 
silver gray; agriculture, maize. 



Chilly 

on Pikes Peak New Year's eve 
with the AdAmAn club were three 
COLORADO COLLEGE students, 
Lew Gieseche, Wilmer Hemming 
and Leonard Sutton, who made up 
the the trip as guests of the club. 

The three COLORADO COL- 
LEGE alumni Bob Ormes, Dobson 
West, and Joe Rohrer also helped 
shoot off the traditional fireworks 
at nine o'clock and again at mid- 
night, while Rohrer was radio chief 
of the group trying to contact Byrd 
at the South Pole. 

They are still trying to decipher 
the code message they received in 
return to see if they really did con- 
tact Byrd. 



Chop Suey 

was the delight to which Dr. Car- 
roll Malone treated his History of 
the Far East class at his home, 
1 121 N. Tejon on Jan. 4. 

Although salad, ice cream, and 
cake completed the menu, an orien- 
tal atmosphere prevailed with the 
table set in the Chinese manner. 
The guests tried eating with chop 
sticks but after many awkward mis- 
haps they sought safety in using 
forks. 

After the supper Dr. Malone 
showed his collection of trinkets, 
valuable novelties, and Chinese 
paintings which his teacher had 
done for him while he was studying 
art in the orient. 



Senior Aid 

Individual aid will be given to 
the women of the senior class in an 
effort to help them in selecting the 
proper vocation after leaving col- 
lege. Miss Anne Boyd Kennon, vo- 
cational counsellor, will act as a 
substitute for Miss East who has 
been called to another position. 

Her services will also be avail- 
able to underclass women who wish 
to have her aid in selecting the pro- 
Der courses for the vocation they 
hope to practice in the future. 
These conferences will be held in 
Bemis ha'l and may be arranged by 
calling Main 727. 

Miss Kennon is a graduate of 
COLORADO COLIEGE. was pre- 
viously Director of the Bureau of 
Collegiate Occupations in Denver 
and s'nce 1929 has been doing per- 
sonnel work for the National Board 
of Young Women's Christian As- 
sociation in New York City. 



New Year Causalities 

Dr. William Blakely, head of the 
Psychology department, and Mr. 
Jack Lawson, instructor in Journal- 
ism have resumed their duties in 
their various departments after a 
week absence due to illness. 

Dr. Blakely has been confined to 
his home with a severe attack of 
influenza and Mr. Lawson has suf- 
fered a muscle strain in his back 
due to a fall. 



Father 

of Mrs. William Copeland and 
Kenneth Stannard, '33, and mem- 
ber of Kappa Sigma, was Mr. Clare 
N. Stannard who died January 3 
in Denver. 

Mr. Stannard was vice president 
of the Public Service Company of 
Colorado and one of Colorado's 
best known citizens. 



Mae West and Cinderella 

With Mae West injected into the 
old mortgaged-homestead idea, the 
Betas and Kappa Alpha Theta, with 
another modernized version of an 
old saga — Cinderella, walked off 
with the prizes at COLORADO 
COLLEGE'S annual Magna Pan 
Pan presented in Perkins Monday 
evening. 




BEN CARSON 

"You aren't really out ..." 
Ben Carson was tremendous as a 
very come-upish Miss West and 
John Cruzan growled and scowled 
and twisted his black mustaches 
very devilishly. In the Theta act, 
the best looking sisters made up a 
stunningly evening-gowned chorus, 
while Anne Florey was a lovely 
Cinderella — special mention for 
her graceful dancing. Other acts 
outstanding were the Kappa Sigs, 
who, after a sad start, rang the bell 
with Beery, Bernard, and Andrews 
as the Three Little Pigs. Delta Gam- 
ma's "Safety Zone" was a clever 
travestry on Murray's and had good 
music while Phi Delta Theta's 
"Woman in the Shoe", probably 
the most original production of any, 
gave everybody a general panning 
to a swell tune with smart 
rhymes. 




HELEN MARGARET SHAW 

She fitted the slipper . . . 

Theo Fenlon, Harriet Engle, Jack 
Kintz, Mrs. Mary Schnitzius Os- 
borne, and Johnny Metzler's Broad- 
moor Hotel orchestra made the 
show smooth with between-act 
specialties. 

Judges were Dean Fauteaux, 
Howard Waite, and Prof. Mathias. 
Managers were Frank Johnson, 
Dick Hall, and Dave Waters. 



THE TIGER 



Friday, January 12, 193 



THE TIGER 




Editor LEW CROSBY 



Business Manager E. F. STAPLETON 

EDITORIAL STAFF 

Editors: Managing Editor, Bob Johnson; Campus Editor, Joseph Lowe; 
Sports Editors, Harold Marlowe, John Bicknell ; Society Editor. Alice Her- 
som ; Makeup Editor, Martin Legere ; Pictorial Editor. David Dentan ; Ex- 
change Editor, John Dickey : News Editors, Miller Stroup, Edith Weaver, 
Peg Swan, Albert Stubblefield, Fritz Baker ; A. W. S., Ernestine Stroup : 
W. A. A., Louie Marie Mason. 

Society staff — Luzilla Eubank, Mildred Fritchle, Muriel McClanahan, 
Sarah Mclntyre, Caroline Morrison, Lyda Roark, Sally Tompkins, Jane 
Walker. Imogene Young. Makeup staff — Edith Gaylord. Exchange staff — 
Charles Macdonald. Sports staff — Ronald Rolph, James Ransom, Dick AI- 
son, David Waters. Proof readers — Lucy Blackman. Frances Stevenson. 
News staff — Jake Johnson, David Dentan, Gilbert Baylis. Alice Sutton, La- 
Rue Wiley. Nanet Meredith, Claire Sweany, Elvira Cortellini, Ruth Mary 
Webster. Esther Alexander. Charles Dewing, Ken Hall. Jennie Conway, 
Mark Schreiber, Marybel Poer, Ruth Liverman, Margaret Stewart, Ann 
Daniels. Conrad Brown, Dale Ashbaugh, Frank Johnson, Jean James, Doro- 
thy Elston, Helen Miller. Ellen Perry. Susan Braerton. Dick Hall, Emma 
Louise Jordan, Virginia Botsford, Roberta McKay. 



-J 



+ Win Or Lose 

the COLORADO COLLEGE basketball team has given pre-season 
notice of giving the other clubs in the conference a good run for their 
money. The victory over Denver Athletic Club was the spark which 
should fire COLORADO COLLEGE students and alumni alike with a 
WILL TO WIN. We need a winner, and it is much easier to support a 
winner. BUT, if our support is based upon the idea of a "winner or 
nothing," we don't deserve to have a basketball championship, or any 
other athletic reward which is given for excellence in sportsmanship as 
much as for any other reason. Let's fight for our SCHOOL AND WHAT 
IT MEANS TO US, and, if we take it on the chin, we go down with a 
grin, remembering that it takes a good man to win, but a much better 
man to fight when the going gets tough. 

+A Hand 

to Koshare of COLORADO COLLEGE and to director Arthur G. 
Sharp, Jr. for outstanding work in making a success out of Magna Pan 
Pan. The show was not perfect, but there was finish to its continuity 
and to the performance of the individual acts. The cooperation of the 
organizations and of those presenting specialty acts bids fair to paving 
the way toward an annual spring musical show which is a project which 
can be made to include many more college performers than does the 
average dramatic vehicle, and in addition, presents the idea of a musi- 
cal show, the songs and plot of which will be written by COLORADO 
COLLEGE students. It means organizational cooperation, work for 
everybody, and entertainment for all. Lets put it over. 



NOTICE 

Students are again reminded to 
get their pictures taken immediate- 
ly for the 1934 Nugget at either 
Payton's Studio, 30 S. Tejon, Wag- 
ner-Futs studio in the Burns build- 
ing or Emery studio, 17 E. Cache 
la Poudre. 

Prices of $2 have been arranged 
for four settings, which will include 
enough solios needed for the year 
book and a price of $1.50 for one 
dozen additional photographs. 



1906 Tiger 

The Kappa Sigma fraternity 
gave the first of their series of dan- 
ces, Saturday at the Kinnickinnick. 
The hall was artistically decorated 
with the fraternity colors and with 
numerous pennants and banners. 
Refreshments were served. 



The University of Maine offers 
a course in ice cream making. The 
school is located in the heart of a 
dairy country and ice cream has 
become one of the important by- 
products. 



The Glee club will travel to some 
different schools showing their tal- 
ent in singing. 



Another success for COLORADO 
COLLEGE comes in the very credi- 
table acting of a number of the stu- 
dents in "College Widow". There 
were the rooters, without whom the 
Atwater-Bingham game would have 
been a losing proposition. 



Replacing 

Duane Osborne who left recent- 
ly for New York to study, Johnny 
Day is now holding down the piano 
position with Johnny Metzler's 
Broadmoor hotel orchestra who, 
by the way, promise not to be away 
another Saturday night this sea- 




JOHNNY DAY 

Eddie Duchin arrangements - - 

son but as there were engagements 
that had to be filled, guest bands 
had to be substituted. 

Crack basketball player for two 
years on the A squad, Johnny de- 
serted cage sport for the more lu- 
crative amusement field. Day is a 
junior and has been active in mu- 
sical circles during his three years 
at COLORADO COLLEGE. He is 
a pledge of Sigma Chi fraternity. 

Tarzan 

Professor Malone is a versatile 
man. In addition to teaching his- 
tory and riding his far-famed bi- 
cycle, he can climb trees. Profes- 
sor Boucher displayed the proof at 
a W. A. A. meeting Wednesday 
night when he showed tinted pic- 
tures of the Rocky Mountain Re- 
gion and COLORADO COLLEGE 
hikers. Other screen stars appear- 
ing in the movie were Preston Al- 
bright, Professor Albright, Profes- 
sor Blakely and Professor Ransom. 
At the business meeting preceding 
the showing of the pictures it was 
decided to hold a new shuffleboard 
tournament. Betty Platte, head of 
the hiking sport had charge of the 
meeting. 



Hobbies for the Co-ed 

In the west wing, above the man- 
tle in Coburn library can be found 
a vocational shelf for women, spon- 
sored by the Associated Women 
Students of COLORADO COL- 
LEGE. 

Each week different books are 
selected for the women to read per- 
taining to different subjects women 
of the present day are interested in, 
such as interior decorating, busi- 
ness and scientific research. A list 
of these books are nosted on the 
library bulletin board. 



Many of the students of Berea 
college, in the Kentucky moun- 
tains, pay their tuition in slabs of 
bacon, hams, eggs, and sorghum 
molasses. Several students also 
cam their money by trapping and 
curing coonskins. 



its' 



j 



Progress 

in the educational world \ 
brought out in the insignia day , 
dress delivered by Dr. C. B. H 
shey, acting president, to the me 
bers of the class of 1924, v> 
donned their caps and gowns 
the first time in observance of I 
annual chapel dedicated in th 
honor. 

Invocation was given by Rev 
end Charles Stafford Brown of I 
first Congregational church 
lowed by the singing of the COL 
RADO COLLEGE hymn. Folic 
ing the address, the exercises w< 
closed with "Our Colorado" a 
Dean McMurtry giving the bei 
diction. 

Dr. Hershey indicated the va 
ous changes in the theory of ec 
cation as a direct growth of t 
fundamental changes that t \W U 
world has been undergoing duri 
the past few years. He stressed t '? 
point that education was passi 
from the stage of "educati 
through experience" to "educati 
through instruction". The trend 
the colleges and universities in ; 
lowing the students to choose a 
select their own courses of stu 
was traced through the past. "C< 
leges," concluded Dr. Hershe 
"Like all other industries a 
caught in the whirl of changii 
events." 



fiit 



A 



"Brains 

of Rats and Men" by C. J. H 
rick and "Glands Regulating Pe 
sonality" by Louis Berman are tv 
of 146 new books received recent 
bv Coburn Librarv. There are bool 
of "Soc," "Poli-Sci" and "Tech 

The majority of these new bool 
deal with recent problems. 



The Earl of Chesterfield 

and all his whims as found in tr 
books "Letters Written by the Lai 
Honourable Philip Dormer Stai 
hope. Earl of Chesterfield, to 
Son, Philip Stanhope, Esq., La' 
Envoy Extraordinary at the Cou 
of Dresden, Together with Sever 
other Pieces on Various Subjects 
These letters appear in four vo 
umes given to Coburn Library h 
Dr S. L. Caldwell of this cit 
These books were first published i 
1 774. five more editions were pur 
lished in the same year. 



Pinch-hitting 

Mr. Charles J. Simon. '26. Stai 
ford University, and Mr. Orren Lul 
'26. Kansas University, are relief 
ing Dr. Abbot while he is in Was! 
ington D. C, as a member of th 
President's "Brain Trust" commi' 
tee. 

Mr. Simon, prominent local at 
torney, will have charge of th 
classes in Economics and Mr. Lul 
former Director of Federal Relie 
in Denver has taken over the clas< 
es in Sociology. 



Friday, January 12, 1934 



THE TIGER 



3 



ieyhole Keeper 

"Evie" Graham, an old boy grad- 
uated in '29 who took care of bab- 
ies when he was in school to make 
Imoney, visiting this week on his 
way to Phoenix, where he has now | 
a prospering advertising business, j 
after a three month vacation to 
New York and around .... and 
he's a ringer for Gene Tunney . . . 
can't something be done about that 
heap of reddish stones piled 
against Coburn's north wall? .... 
they're so futile looking'. ... Jo 
Rustin is rumored that way ovsr 
sloe-eyed Betty Britton .... first 
choice for back yonder town 
names: John Johnson's Gypsum, 
Colorado . . . whatever became o\ 
Kay Lingham? .... Mrs. Herbie 
Mierow wrote "Mammy Photo", 
Gamma Phi's Pan Pan skit .... 
and Helen McCandlish in same try- 
ing to light a paper match by 
scratching it on her shoe .... Vic- 
toria Kneip's trick hair-do 

a little braided whozis on top of her 
head .... one word description of 
Atley Chapman: skittish . . . Stella 
Buckwald's lush type of beauty . . 
. . Abbott's sociology successor, one 
Mr. Lull from K. U., is said to have 
stirred several female citizens out 
of their lethargy with his black 
mustached handsomeness . . . some- 
thing peculiar in this name gleaned 
from the directory: Rhoda Crouch 
— rode a etc. . . . the week's storv 
is a gem about keeping the stork 

from the door etc this from 

Boardman Robinson : "Nadine Kent 
is the only woman in Colorado 
Springs who amounts to anvthing as 
an artist" .... Shelly Williams. 
Salt Lake City boy who made good 
on the campus . . . Desisn for Liv- 
ing's (movie version) "Immorality 
may be fun but it's not fun enough 
to take the place of 100% virtue 
and three squar meals a day" 
threatens to become also a second 
"why - don't - you - -come - up- 
mometime" . . . Dick Hall and Stic- 
Vy Glew look alike . . and Withers 
Cool is a vins;er for Bully Van de 
Graaff . . . Mary Hyatt h*s a sign 
on her Bemis room door "Men" . . 
. . and as the keeper hasn't in- 
dulged in this as much as the gen- 
eral public: the Kappa Sig house 
is now probably The Pig Parlor . . 
Bemis food is really lousey. Ter- 
rible at first, then improved, and 
now terrible again, the general fare 
is such as to drive nice girls to the 
College Inn and such places to se- 
cure adequate nourishment. For in- 
stance, at a recent luncheon the 
main dish was a mass of onions, 
potatoes, and pork cooked together 
en casserole — it sounds like prison 
fare. Our feminine beauty is not so 
plentiful here that it can be subjec- 
ted to such torments and come out 
unblotched. Because Bemis custo- 



mers have no choice in the matter 
and few means of protest, is no rea- : . canc |y 
son they should be taken advantage I ' , 

of and fed ugly, ill-tasting dishes. » candy 
We want protection for our female hisses, 
digestions and complexions! 



The girls at Vassar recently sued \ The names of all professors who 

keep their classes overtime are 
published regularly at the Univer- 
sity of Kansas. 

— Colo-WoICo. 



company 
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maying 
making 



T'S A GOOD IDEA- 




JOIN THE CRUSADE 

AGAINST 

"PRETTY PANTS" 



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by name, please! 



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THADE ^fifi*' MARK 



SAN FRANCISCO 






CALIFORNIA 



NONE GENUINE WITHOUT THIS 
LABEL INSIDE OF WAISTBAND 



He who blossoms out in tricky corduroys invites 
embarrassing situations. But he who meets the 
world in distinctive, conservative Campus Cords 
always commands respect. 

Campus Cords are clean-cut and masculine. 
Their snug hip fit and straight hang make them 
favorites with university men everywhere. 

This "official" corduroy trouser wears almost 
unbelievably well, and stays young through count- 
less tubbings or cleanings. 

The Campus Cords dealer knows university style 
standards. See him now for Campus Cords'*' and 
other correct apparel. 



* A ho see CAMPUS FLANNELS, CAMPUS TWEEDS, 
CAMPUS BUCKS and CAMPUS DUCKS trousers 
that "check" with Campus Cords in every detail of good 
style. 



CAMPUS CORDS 

Perkins-Shearer Distributors 



THE TIGER 



Friday, January 12, 1934 




HIMVAMMVA 




For a complete selection 
of Fancy Groceries, Fresh 
Fruits and Vegetables and 
Quality Meats 



Trade at these Stores 

STORE LOCATIONS 
122 S. Tejon 717 N. Weber 
132 N. Tejon 332 N. Institute 




Smith 



A NEW STAR 

On Denver's Amusement 
Horizon 

SMITH BALLEN 

Leader of New York's lat- 
est orchestra hit who comes 
to Denver from the smart 
Club Richman to take over 
the duties of band master in 
the Silver Glade. 

Cosmopolitan 
Hotel 



The 

Quickest 
Way Home 




^J"0 MATTER how many miles away, you 
can visit the folks at home any time, by 
telephone. 

Just give the Long Distance operator your 
home telephone number and talk with the 
whole family. Try it tonight. It's a lot quicker 
and more satisfactory than writing. 




PORT 



TIGER ROARS 




( the campus, Palmer, Shove, Mur- 
j ray's and even the Jungle all week 
! in search of TIGER ROARS. Oh, 
yes, many a Tiger roared Monday 
at the annual all-COLORADO 
COLLEGE vaudeville show. No it 
wasn't an intercollegiate athletic af- 
fair, nor were there any officials 
stepping off penalizations nor call- 
ing free throws. Art Sharp did show 
his prestige, however, when several 
acts were at the last minute (using 
his dramatical expression) "cut". 
Nevertheless it was a great show, 
and those tough warriors of the 
gridiron, Beery, Bernard, and our 
honorable captain-elect. Steve An- 
drews appeared upon the scene in 
bright colored unmentionables 
(who would have suspected it). We 
always said, though, "The real test 
of a man, or a group, or a species, 
is energy, capacity, and power. 

And did the Tigers along with 
Tigerettes, ever ROAR when Lad- 
lslaus deHolezer deliberately and 
quite openly apDeared upon the 
stage wistfully whisking the bright 
four stripes and the big C. 

Not securing enough data here 
to sufficiently fill the Tiger Roar 
column. I kept my eves open (I sel- 
dom dol in classes during the week 
"Red'' LeMaster possesses another 
talent other than his athletic abil- 
ity on the gridiron. He has turned 
debater and really won his part (the 
affirmative) not because the affir- 
mative was good, but because the 
negative was terrible. 

And then, there is that yet to be 
football hero — George Leonard 
Gearhart, who hails from Clearfield, 
Penn., and whose man-power got 
the best of him during the holidays 
— ... Result: A badlv mangled 
hand and face and a slightly de- 
moralized pocketbook . . . And then 
there's Sutak. Ask him to tell you 
a story . . sometime. And did you 
know little man "Fish's" right 
knee was sort of banged up on the 

mat the other night? And 

who couldn't find a pair of Finger- 
size crutches. 

Perhaps we could go on forever 
with these various roars, but it is 
really time to get serious and think 
about the first game to be played 
here tomorrow night, when the Ti- 
gers match hardwood ability with 
the rejuvenated Denver U. Pioneers. 
Denver has been steadily improving 
and has been playing a first rate 
brand of ball. They will be out for 
blood when they encounter the 



COLORADO COLLEGE Tiger here 
tomorrow night. Let's Eat 'Em Up, 
Tigers! 



Fijis and Phi Delts 

were teams victorious in Inter- 
fraternity games played at Cossitt 
Tuesday night. The Phi Gamma 
Deltas eked out a close decision ov- 
er the Kappa Sigs by the close 1 
score of 10-9. The Phi Delts, after 
a slow and inconsistent first half 
found their stride in the last frame 
and defeated the Delta Alphs by a 
score of 20-7. 

Outstanding players and goal tos- 
sers of the evening were Slater, Phi 
Gamma Delta; Trainor, Kappa Sig- 
ma; Price, Phi Delta Theta and 
Miles, Delta Alpha Phi. 



Livingston and Boothe 

were the main cogs of the Tiger 
basketball machine that wheeled 
the strong Denver Athletic Club to 
a 38-21 defeat at the auditorium 
Saturday night. Elwood Romney, 
their Ail-American forward was 
held to one lone field goal by the 
spectacular guarding of "Albie" 
Boothe. Practically every man in 
the C. C. starting lineuD hit the 
scoring column and the Tigers play- 
ed a decidedly improved brand of 
ball. The Tiger scoring rampage 
was led by Jack Livingston, center, 
whose bang-up brand of ball was 
the feature of the evening's cage 
offering. He sank four field goals 
and a trio of free throws for a to- 
tal of eleven points. 

At the half, the Tigers were lead- 
ing 15-9 and went on a scoring 
srjree the final go and trounced off 
the hardwood with a well-earned 
victory. At the outset of the same 
the fray was nip and tuck, and not 
many minutes had passed befort, 
the count stood 7-7. From then on 
the Timers slowly drew away from 
the Clubmen, and the final outcome 
of the same then depended unon 
iust how hot the COLORADO COL- 
LEGE basketeers grew as far as 
goal tossing was concerned. 

Tonight, the team travels to Den- 
ver, where thev will seek revenge, 
not forgetting the walloping the pig- 
skin warriors took at the hands of 
the Denver University Pioneers sev- 
eral months ago. The teams will re- 
sume action here tomorrow night 
when they will open the C. C. home 
schedule against the same team 
they oppose tonight. 



(NSFA) — Fifteen Barnard stu- 
dents, last year, spent between 20 
and 24 hours a week in commut- 
ing to and from college according 
to the figure compiled by the oc- 
cupation bureau. 

— Barnard Bulletin. 




TIGER 



lapel Calendar 

jesday, Jan. 16, 10:00 a. m. 

Chapel Service Speaker: Dr. 
Herbert E. Evans, Councilor 
to the Protestant Students and 
a member of the Coaching 
staff of Columbia University, 
New York. 

Subject: "The Relation be- 
tween Religion and Christian- 
lty. 



owdered Wigs 

and knee breeches will be 
rought out of co-ed's closets for 
ie annual A. W. S. Colonial Ball 
) be held in Bemis February 23, 
jonsored by the sophomore Wom- 
oof COLORADO COLLEGE. 

Committee heads which have 
een chosen are Catherine Corning, 
osters and publicity; Johana Jol- 
r, programs; Mary Elizabeth Lov- 
t, Invitations; Mary Bel Poer, 
lusic and refreshments; Mary Jo 
parkman minuet. 




CAMPUS CHIC 

Dinner gowns are fascinating in 
heir beauty and romance, and the 
ampus has followed the modes of 
he day back to feminine charm 
Iracia Wrye wears a beautiful 
>lack gown with a startling Ameri- 
an beauty sash. The neck-line is 
,w, coming to a point in the back. 
^k belt is fastened there, crosses 
and goes lo a large bow in the 
front. The sleeves are puffed, nar- 
rowing into a long tight cuff. The 
ichness of the dress is character- 
stic of Gracia's wardrobe. 

Sue Braerton is lovely in a din- 
ler gown of daffodil yellow, simple 
tnd beautiful, with long sleeves, 
nine-stone belt and a more formal 
ine in the divided back. 

Lois Waldorf wears a turquoise 
>lue velvet, which has a shoulder 
uff that gives it an old-fashioned 
'eauty. Her net hat has a gleaming 
old sequin edge. She succeeds in 
)oking both svelt and smart. 

Ruth Forbush wears a black taf- 
eta dress with gold triangular dots, 
he jacket has a ruff down the 
ront, a high collar, and a broad- 
bouldered effect. Her slippers are 
lack with a gold mesh, and she 
'ears gold earings and bracelet. 



The Social Calendar 

Friday, Jan. 12 

Kappa Sigma Tea dance. 
Saturday, Jan. 13 

Kappa Alpha Theta Tea dance 
for Sigma Chi 
Sunday, January 14 

Newman club 
Saturday, January 20 

Phi Delta Theta dance 



Carrie Coed's Letters 
Dear Sis: — 

And by now we have reached 
that well known stage of the game 
— the time to write term papers. In 
my ignorance I worried about the 
process for two months, actually 
took six books out of the libe, and 
prepared for a long winter's night 
of work. When a blessed sorority 
sister came along and suggested 
perusing the much-bethumbed files 
at the house. 

I dashed thither after lunch to- 
day and received a liberal educa- 
tion, if no actual help on my paper. 
Such topics as "How to Get Your 
Man". "The Greeks in 600 B. C", 
"The Development of the Trilo- 
bite", "The Sex Problem in Modern 
Colleges", proved of slight value to 
my immediate problem of English 
Drama. But the afternoon proved 
amusing, especially when six fra- 
ternity men arrived to learn an aes- 
thetic dance for their vaudeville act. 

By the time they had acquired 
the subtle movements necessary for 
the right effect we all pitched in and 
snatched some not-quite-hot enough 
chile and proceeded to rehearse our 
own feeble effort at humor and 
grace for the galoriousss show. 

And then to Pan-Pan. I can not 
take the valuable time to give you 
the gruesome details. Suffice it to 
say, there was beautv, humor, sar- 
casm, slap-stick and other stuff 
that leaves me wordless. And just 
when I need five thousand words for 
a paper too. 

Which reminds me — I must off 
and find some worthy soul with a 
unique idea on how to write a term 
paper with the least possible output 
of intelligence and effort. 

Dramatically yours, 
Carrie 



Colossal 

from standpoints of both crowd 
and entertainment was the subscrip- 
tion dance given by Delta Gamma 
at the Broadmoor Hotel, Saturday 
night, Jan. 6. Johnny Metzler's Ho- 
tel Broadmoor Orchestra furnished 
the music for the dancers, while 
tables of bridge furnished entertain- 
ment for all those who chose to 
take their enjoyment sitting down. 



•CJHANGrB 



The faculty of the Northern 
State Teachers' college have vol- 
tarily reduced their salaries in or- 
der to create a fund for impover- 
ished students. This was prompted 
by the revelation that several stu- 
dents were living on one meal a 
day. 



— Branding Iron. 
Inn College at Lee-McRea, of 
North Carolina, the students turn 
the dormitory into an inn during 
the summer months and a dormi- 
tory during the winter. Home eco- 
nomics majors wash dishes, and 

football huskies hustle baks. 
••• ••• ••• 

Students at the University of 
Washington buy more than forty 
thousand cigarettes and seventy- 
five hundred candy bars monthly. 

Creighton university, Omaha, 
Nebraska, won a debate from Cam- 
bridge university of England before 
a crowd of over 2000 people. The 
question debated was the problem 
of radio control. The British, do 
not like our system of broadcasting. 
They say it includes too much ad- 
vertising. 

••• ■•• ••• 

A trusting professor at Univer- 
sity of California said: "I will pre- 
pare two questions, one for the 
people in odd numbered seats, and 
the other for those in even num- 
bered seats. With such an arrange- 
ment there will undoubtedly be 

more opportunity for originality." 
••• ••■ ••- 

Kindness to dumb animals. A 

sociology prof at the University of 

Wisconsin passes out cigarettes 

during the exams to make students 

more natural, because he says, the 

course itself is such an inhuman 

one. 

— Rocky Mt. Junior Collegian. 
-•• ••> ••• 

Young Lochinvars and vaga- 
bonds have organized the "Hobo 
College," composed of intellectual 
hobos, many of them holding de- 



Have your Nugget photo- 
graphs made now and avoid 
the rush 

STUDIO 

Fine Portraiture 
Across from the campus 



grees from both American and 
European universities. These out- 
casts hold open forum meetings 

every night in an old barn. 

■•■ •** «•• 

A student at the University of 
Vienna can sign up for a course, 
miss all his classes, and only meet 
the professor when the final ex- 
aminations are given. They pass 
as often as those who attend all 
the lectures. 

••• ••• ••• 

Ventura Junior college is con- 
templating inaugurating a new 
aeronautics course in the near fu- 
ture in addition to its auto shop. 

-w ■•• •!>■ 

Faculty members of Winthrop 
college, Rock Hill, S. C, partici- 
pated recently in a humorous de- 
bate involving the types of women 
as a subject. 

— L. A. Junior Collegian. 
••• «•• ••• 

Stanford University rules that 
beauty queens must weigh at least 
150 pounds. 



(NSFA) — Twenty-seven thous- 
and yards of adhesive tape and 
600 yards af gauze have been pur- 
chased by Louisiana State univer- 
sity for use on its athletes during 
the coming year. — Aquin. 



Ask Roy 
about It! 

We Sell — Rent — Repair 
and Exchange 

Every Make 

Typewriter 

AND 

Adding Machine 



\***i> 




125 N. Tejon St. 
Phone Main 95 



istjutiijj' 



COMPLIMENTS 
OF 

FRANK'S PHARMACY 



1501 W. Colorado Avenue 



Phone Main 3361 



THE TIGER 



Friday, January 12, 19! 



Colorado College 

TEXT BOOKS 

AND SUPPLIES 

C. C. and Fraternity 

Stationery 

Laundry Bags — $2.00 Each 

Murray Drug Co. 

Across From the Campus 



ic: 

ELECTRIC CO. 

Call Main 939, Rear 15 E. Bijou 



PHOTOGRAPHS 

The Gift that only you can give 
Official Photographer, C. C. Nugget 

PAYTON STUDIO 

30 S. Tejon Phone M. 477-J 



Have your pictures taken now 

Official Photographer for 
the Nugget 

WAGNER-FULTS 

Burns Building 



Quality "Master'Tleaners 

Only one Quality and the 
Price is uniform 

VI in 1-8-1-1 10 E. Kiowa 

H. A. Thompson 




Coburn Library 

COLORADO COLLEGE 

Colorado Springs, Colorado 
Fully accredited Co-educational 

Adequate equipment and high standards of scholastic attainment 
make Colorado College one of the outstanding Liberal Arts Col- 
leges of the country. 

A large faculty makes possible an individual friendly guidance 
for each student. 

Thorough and interesting courses in the Schools of ARTS and 
SCIENCES, LETTERS and FINE ARTS, the NATURAL SCI- 
ENCES, and the SOCIAL SCIENCES develop his mind in prep- 
aration for purposeful effective living in the modern world. 

Unsurpassed climate, beautiful environment and the influence of 
a cultured community combine to make study at COLORADO 
COLLEGE a privilege. 

C. B. HERSHEY, A. M., ED. D., Acting President. 



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Do you "love" beautiful, sheer hose? Then don't 
miss this January Sale of exquisite Chiffon Hose with 
the new Custom-Made sizing. Berkshire Custom-Made 
Stockings were designed to meet the demands of the 
woman who has experienced difficulty in purchasing 
hoisery which would fit properly. Custom-Made hosiery 
is made in three lengths and tailored throughout to fit 
perfectly. 



Short— 28J/ 2 -inch 
length, narrow 
width thruout, with 
elasticity to give 
ankle fit. Sizes 8J/2 
to 9j/ 2 - 



Average — 31 -inch 
length, full width 
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made to fit the av- 
erage woman. 
Sizes 8J/ 2 to IOJ/ 2 - 



Long — 33-i n c h 
length, extra full 
top and width. For 
the tall, or woman 
needing extra 
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WHAT THE TERM "IRREGULAR" MEANS ! 
Many women confuse the term "irregular" with 
the term "Seconds." Fine hosiery is rigidly inspected, 
and if there is the slightest imperfection of weave in 
any part of the hose it is graded as an "Irregular" ; 
if the imperfection is more than slight, it is a "Sec- 
ond." The hose we are offering you tomorrow are "Ir- 
regulars," with slight imperfections of weave that we 
do not believe will endanger their wearing qualities. 

FIRST FLOOR 

^"*^ DEPARTMENT STORE 





— Pikes Peak as seen from the Tiger jungle. 



Issued each week during the academic year. Entered at the'ost Of rice at Colorado Springs <u Second-Class Matter. 



THE TIGER 



Friday, January 19, 19c 




The Biggest Nickel's 
worth of GOOD Candy 
You Ever Bought Try 
It! 



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and $1.25 

Envelopes 

Raised monogram in terra 
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We Sell — Rent — Repair 
and Exchange 

Every Make 

Typewriter 

AND 

Adding Machine 



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Man 



125 N. Tejon St. 
Phone Main 95 




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Colorado College 

TEXT BOOKS 

AND SUPPLIES 

C. C. and Fraternity 

Stationery 

Laundry Bags — $2.00 Each 

Murray Drug Co. 

Across From the Campus 



* 



The best way to tell of the 
beauty of Colorado, Stand- 
ley's Color Pictures, Hand- 
Colored — 35 cents up. 

H.L.Standley 

PHOTOGRAPHER 

224 No. Tejon St. 

Colorado Springs 






OCIAL 



COMPLIMENTS 
OF 

FRANK'S PHARMACY 



CHAPEL CALENDAR 
Tuesday, Jan. 23, 10:00 a. m. — 

Chapel service. Speaker: Rev. 
Charles S. Brown, pastor, First 
Congregational Church. 



Carrie-Coed's Letter 

Dear Sis — 

Saw my first C. C. basketball 
game last Saturday night, and I 
must admit to getting enthused, 
even to the undignified extent of 
standing on my chair and scream- 
ing meaningless remarks. Every- 
one else was acting likewise, so 
1-ion't think me depraved. I actual- 
ly detected glimmers of "school 
spirit", that undefinable something 
that I was so disappointed in not 
finding here last fall. Do you sup- 
pose the old dump is going to perk 
up and have some life after all? 

And another thing. Tuesday I 
ventured into the chapel with the 
usual outlook in mind of catching 
up on a little lost sleep. Fancy my 
amazement when I found the 
speaker, one Dr. Herbert Evans of 
Columbia, interesting, clear-spok- 
en, and absolutely unworthy of be- 
ing slept through. One by one the 
people around me sat up straight- 
er, closed their books, jerked up 
their nodding heads, and LIST- 
ENED. If more speakers like him 
were procured, one might give some 
serious thought to this question of 
religion, so indefinite and vague in 
the minds of most college students. 

Two miracles — and all inside a 
week. Things are looking up. And 
to cap the climax, I have finished 
term paper number two. Only one 
to go! 

With which array of startling 
frets I hope I have brightened your 
life temporarily, as they have 
brightened mine, the poor disillu- 
sioned college freshman. 



The Social Calendar 

Saturday, January 20 

Phi Delta Theta dance. 
Tuesday, January 23 

A. W. S. board. 

Euterpe 
Sunday, January 28 

Newman club. 

Decorations 

and entertainment with a Sis 
ma Chi motive were in evidence < 
the Kappa Alpha Theta tea danc 
given in honor of the members 
the Sigma Chi fraternity on Satu 
day afternoon, January 13. A Sid 
ma Chi cross was hung on the we| 
of the Theta lodge and a dramat 
zation of "The Sweetheart of Sii 
ma Chi" was presented, in whic 
the leading parts were taken b 
Helen Margaret Shaw, and Mar 
Jean MacDonald. 




Hopefully, 



Carrie. 



1501 W. Colorado Avenue 



Phone Main 3361 



Subscribe NOW for The 

GAZETTE, 'TELEGRAPH 

Morning — Evening — Sunday "All The News All The Time" 



Daily Only 
I 5c per week 



Daily and Sunday 
20c per week 



Combination 
35c per week 



Models 

COLORADO COLLEGE manne- 
quins may be seen modeling fur 
coats next Wednesday, Thursday 
and Friday evenings, January 24, 
25 and 26 at the Chief theatre. 
They will show the latest modes in 
sport, dress and evening furs. The 
girls modeling are Dorothy Weaver, 
Mary Jean McDonald and Eliza- 
beth Evans. 



Have your pictures taken now 

Official Photographer for 
the Nugget 

WAGNER-FULTS 

Burns Building 



CAMPUS CHIC 

Rings! Rings! Rings! Christma 
rings! Engagement rings! Emm 
Louise Jordan wears a zircon ston 
surrounded by pearls. It's large an< 
smart, but delicate in its coloring 
Dodo Skidmore and Sally Tompkin 
received black onyx fraternity 
rings. 

Margaret Kirby's diamond 
large and beautiful guarded by tw< 
smaller ones, and set in engrave 
platinum. Three diamonds in 
white gold setting is Helen Haney 
ring, dainty and charming like He 
en herself. 

Marietta Sinton's is a diamond- 
beautiful in its simplicity, set in yelJ 
low gold, and is especially signifi 
cant because it belonged to John': 
mother. 

Peg Utterback is wearing a stun^ 
ning ring which bears a crest, anc 
a bracelet to match. Very swanky. 



i 



Tea 

A long established custom o j 
serving tea in an informal mannei 
to the members of the faculty anc 
student body on the afternoons dur 
ing final examination between A 
and 6 p. m. will be carried out thil 
vear in Bemis commons instead of 
Ticknor study as in the past. 

Members of the faculty and staff, 
living in the halls, will serve as hos- 
tesses assisted by groups of stu- 
dents. 



VOLUME XXXVI 



THE TIGER 



COLORADO COLLEGE WEEKLY NEWS-MAGAZINE 



Number 16 




Religion and Christianity 

"Educated people should rid 

themselves of religion which has no 

reality or purpose" said Mr. Herbert 

E. Evans of Columbia University, 

in Tuesday Morning chapel. Mr. 

Evans is a member of the Columbia 

; I University coaching staff and has 

l ; remained in Colorado on his teams' 

I return from California in an effort 

1 to find a suitable summer camp for 

1Y. M. C. A. work, with which he 

I is connected. 

Speaking on the topic "The Re- 
lation of Religion and Christianity," 
Mr. Evans told how many college 
students reject religion because 
' their parents have given them re- 
ligious order with which they are 
bored to death. "Religion of this 
type is useless for any young per- 
son and they will never grow up 
religiously or understand social 
systems other than the one they ac- 
quire in other walks of life." 

The relation of religion and 
Christianity is that together they 
form a back-bone. Christianity is 
an ethical system that calls the tan- 
pent in life and is the basic of re- 
ligion. Christianity is interested in 
losing people in the depth of life — 
men and women may come who will 
really be interested in a world and 
a new living. 

"I feel sorry for those who can- 
not lose themselves in something 
greater than themselves. I pity the 
person who says "beautiful" and 
does not mean it." 



Featured 

on the mantle this week at Co- 
burn Library are books relative to 
literature. Aspirins: Poets are invit- 
ed to consult "The Theory of 
Poetry" bv Abercrombie while bud- 
ding Henries have "The Short 
Story" by Albright. "Writing the 
Short Story" bv Esenwein, and 
"The Writing of Fiction" by Whar- 
burton. Embryonic Eugene O'Neils 
may be helped by "How to Write a 
Plav" by Walters. 

These books are easily found by 
the attractive blue and silver cov- 
ers on the mantle at the left as one 
enters the door. 



No Addition 

will be made to the COLORADO 
COLLEGE faculty to fill the vac- 
ancy caused by the death of Pro- 
fessor A. B. Hulbert as Dr. Malone 
has taken over the American his- 
tory class and the English History 
class will be under the direction of 
Professor C. C. Bayley. 



Pre-Registration 

notices have been mailed to each 
member of the TIGER student 
body, These notices give the name 
of the individual's advisor, and the 
time and place when student and 
advisor may meet, in order to select 
a tentative course for the second 
semester. This information is very 
necessary to mitigate the complexi- 
ties of the normal registration day. 
Cooperation in this matter will be 
greatly appreciated by the registrar. 
The alphabetical schedule for reg- 
istration day, February 3, is as fol- 
lows: 

A to F inclusive— 8:30 to 10:00 
A. M. G to L inclusive — 10:00 to 
11:30 A. M.; M to R Inclusive 
1:30 to 3:00 P. M.; S to Z — 
3:00 to 4:30 P. M. 



How Time Flies 

That COLORADO COLLEGE 
was no matrimonial bureau and 
that he did not want COLORADO 
COLLEGE to earn the name of 
such was a statement made by Dr. 
C. A. Duniway, then president of 
the college, in his opening address 
of the school year in September, 
1920. Dr. Duniway went on to say 
that there were "too many engage- 
ments last year", and he made a 
special plea that there be fewer en- 
gagements during the year and that 
there be "no engagements announc- 
ed among the freshmen". 



Debate 

The COLORADO COLLEGE de- 
bating team will hold a practice de- 
bate in room 45 of Palmer hall Fri- 
day afternoon at 3 p. m. on the 
subject chosen for the inter-colleg- 
iate contest. Dr. Edith Bramhall, 
head of the Political Science de- 
partment will act as critic and in- 
structor. 



Euterpe, 

COLORADO COLLEGE'S musi- 
cal organization held its bi-monthly 
meeting at the home of Dorothy El- 
ston Tesday night. After the usual 
business meeting a social hour and 
refreshments were enjoyed. 

Euterpe will again meet Tuesday 
evening. January 23 at the home of 
Jane Wahtola. 

Their program will include: 
Piano — Allegretto from Third 
Symphony 
Helen Thompson 
Reading — Selected 

Mrs. Ruth Paige 
Piano — Lef Fylvains — Chami- 
nade 
Bernice Faught 



Prospective 

students of COLORADO COL- 
LEGE from the Arkansas Valley 
were entertained at the Harvey 
House in La Junta by the COLO- 
RADO COLLEGE association of La 
Junta and Las Animas, January 5. 
More than 50 guests attended. 

Lloyd Larson '18 was chairman 
of the meeting. Acting president C. 
B. Hershey and William Copeland 
gave short talks. Dr. Boucher 
showed pictures of the campus. 

COLORADO COLLEGE under- 
graduates who attended were Mary 
Alice Benson, Eleanor Lynch, Betty 
Barrie, Gale Middlestetter, Francis 
Cuckow, and Carl Zeiger. 



Right And Wrong 

"Laottsu, the oldest of the Chi- 
nese philosophers, believed in a 
laissez faire government, where 
government should not interfere 
too much with the individual," 
stated Dr. Carroll B. Malone, pro- 
fessor of history at COLORADO 
COLLEGE, in a lecture on Chinese 
Philosophy, before the Open For- 
um meeting held in the county 
court house last Sunday. 

"Confucius is the second and he 
has been regarded as the greatest 
of the Chinese philosophers. He 
believed the world was not right, 
but we should try to set a right ex- 
ample ourselves and try to reform 
it according to the ideals we have. 
He was eminently practical and 
many of his ideas would be worth 
adopting today." 

"Moti taught that unselfishness 
and universal love are the best ba- 
s's for life. The young students of 
China have dragged out Moti and 
have found a great deal of similar- 
ity between the teachings of this 
philosopher and those of Jesus 
Christ. He condemned war, and 
said even the victor loses in the 
end. He taught the will of heaven 
was that all men should love one 
another." 



Costly Results 

of the gold refining Drocess as 
witnessed by Alpha Kappa Psi 
Tuesday at the Golden Cycle Mill 
are bricks 8 x 3 by 4 inches, weigh- 
ing 90 pounds and worth between 
$25,000 and $40,000. 

The scene begins with the crush- 
ing of the ore to dust. It is then 
roasted in ovens, mixed with cyan- 
ide, filtered to eliminate foreign 
substances, and finally moulded in- 
to bricks. 



Representatives 

of the six fraternities on the 
COLORADO COLLEGE campus 
met in Cossitt commons Monday 
night to transact the business com- 
ing before the interfraternity board 
during the month of January. The 
meeting was under the direction of 
Arthur Sharp, Jr., president of the 
interfraternity council. 

Plans are under consideration to 
make the presentation of this year's 
intramural cups at the last assem- 
bly meeting of the year rather than 
waiting until next fall. Other mis- 
cellaneous business was taken up 
and discussed before the meeting 
was adjourned. 



Faculty Facts 

After a serious illness with a ser- 
ious name — streptococcus throat, 
to be exact — Miss Amanda M. El- 
lis, professor of English, is now able 
to continue her classes. 

Following the vogue for appen- 
dectomies set by such well known 
alumnae and students as Marion 
MacMillan, Mary Agnes Wherle, 
Marguerite Dixon, and Earl (Bud) 
Udick, Miss Maude A. Kinneburg, 
Director of Dormitories, is in Glock- 
ner Hospital recovering from her 
operation on Thursday, Jan. 12. 



Trutruca 

is the name of the musical in- 
strument to be found in the muse- 
um in Palmer hall. It is a peculiar 
instrument, being at least eight 
feet long, with a horn at the end 
of the tube. It is an instrument 
used by the Araucanian Indians of 
Chile, South America and was pre- 
sented to COLORADO COLLEGE 
by H. E. Ewing, '08. What sort of 
noise it produces is not known. 



Boots And Spurs 

Our coed equestrians held their 
first annual horse show Wednesday 
at Westlake Field in Broadmoor. 
The event was the culmination of 
the riding class program for the se- 
mester. All fall the girls have rid- 
den over the trails of the region, 
under the direction of Miss Doro- 
thea Carleton. 

Dorothy Skidmore placed first 
in the singles competition, while 
Peggy Simpson and Edna Harlan 
were first in the doubles. Ernest 
Bullock of the Broadmoor stables 
was judge. The feature of the 
afternoon was the potato race. 



THE TIGER 



Friday, January 19, 1934! 



PORTS ♦ 




Hot from the Hardwood 

The lid of the Tiger basketball 
season was most adequately blown 
off at the Auditorium last week-end 
when the Bengals took a pair of 
games from the Denver U. Pioneers. 
Although the games were somewhat 
rough, they were well played, thus 
putting the Tigers in a tie with Wy- 
oming, C. U., and Colorado Aggies 
for first place. This week the Tig- 
ers meet a tough assignment when 
they encounter Western State in a 
two game series, both of which will 
be played at the auditorium tonight 
and tomorrow night. 



Around the Conference 

The Aggies and Les Witte loom 
as the real obstacle for the Bengals 
at the present time. Western State 
has a veteran lineup and should 
give the Tigers an exciting eve- 
ning's worth of entertainment . . . 
Mines is far above its 1933 power 

.... Colorado U the dark- 
horse team. . . . Teachers .... can 
be expected to pull several upsets 

.... Glidden, C. C. forward is 
fifth in the leading scorer's column 
.... Livingston has scored thirteen 
points. 

Below is the standing of the 
teams after the first few weeks of 
play: 

Won Lost Pet 
Wyoming University 2 1.000 
COLO. COLLEGE 2 1.000 
Colorado Univ. 2 1.000 

Colorado Aaaies 2 1 .000 

Denver Univ. 1 2 .333 

Western State 2 .000 

Colorado Teachers 2 .000 
Colorado Mines 4 .000 

Phi Delts and Phi Gams 

were teams victorious Tuesday 
evening at Cossitt in the second 
round of interfraternity strife. The 
Phi Delts ran up a score of 21-13 
against the Betas, while in the sec- 
< id offering of the evening the Phi 
Gams handed the Delta Alphs a 32- 
1 5 beating. 

Outstanding players and goal tos- 



sers of the evening were Price, Phi 
Delta Theta, Walsh, Beta Theta Pi, 
Slator, Phi Gamma Delta and Miles 
Delta Alpha Phi. 

On the Mat 

The Black and Gold wrestlers 
were thrown to a 20J/2 to 25J/2 d e " 
feat by the Y. M. C. A. grapplers in 
a dual meet at the Y. gymnasium 
Friday night. 

In matches actually wrestled, the 
two teams tied and the score stood 
\. M. C. A. 15|/ 2 — C. C. 151/2, 
but Rustin, C. C. 118 pound mat- 
man failed to make weight in this 
division, and Robinson was declar- 
ed winner by default. 

In the feature bout of the even- 
ing Chuck Winters threw Slocum, 
Y giant, in four minutes and twen- 
ty-eight seconds. 
126 pound — Spears, Y. threw Mc- 

Connell, C. C. 6:10 
135 pounds — Brady, Y. threw 

Shantz, C. C, 6:15 
145 pounds — Broch, Y., defeated 

Miles, C. C, decision 
1 55 pounds — Funk, C. C, defeat- 
ed Campbell, Y., decision 
165 pounds — Johnson, C. C, threw 

Vandenburg, Y, 5:40 
1 75 pounds — Haines, C. C, and 
Price, Y., wrestled to a draw in 
two necessary overtime rjeriods 
Heavyweight — Winters. C. C. de- 
feated Slocum, Y., 4:28. 



Revenge 

As is well known. Denver Uni- 
versity twisted the tails of the Tig- 
ers on the gridiron, but Friday and 
Saturday evenings proved to be the 
time of revenge for the Black and 
Gold. 

In Denver COLORADO COL- 
LEGE went to town against the Pi- 
oneers even if it did take an over- 
time period to accomplish it. This 
game was the Tiger's first confer- 
ence tussle of the v e a»\ Glidden and 
Livingston were the heroes of the 
evenine for COLORADO COL- 
LEGE. The game at the end of the 
second period, was tied at 22 all : 
however, the Tigers came back in 
the extra period with a goal bv Ri- 
ley and two foul shots by Booth, 
to put the same on ice. Score. COL- 
ORADO COLLEGE 26, DENVER 
UNIVERSITY 22. 

In the return game Saturday 
night at Colorado Springs, the game 
proved to be a nip and tuck affair 
until the final minutes of play, when 
the Tigers broke the 17-17 tie. with 
Livingston sinking a basket, Boolhe 
adding three points, and Glidden 
sinking another goal. The final 
score was COLORADO COLLEGE 
27, DENVER UNIVERSITY 20. 



Only the C 



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Always the Finest 



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Copyright, 1934. The Amorlcaa Tobacco Company. 



Quality "Master"Cleaners 

Only one Quality and the 
Price is uniform 

M. in 1-8-1-1 10 E. Kiowa 

H. A. Thompson 



BERWK 

ELECTRIC CO. 

Call Main 939. Rear 15 E 



j'riday, January 19, 1934 



THE TIGER 




eaves are usea in 



di 



LUCKIES 




FortkeSe are tkeMildesf 

andju/li/ ripened for 

fierfeef smoking 

We buy only the center leaves 
for Luckies. Not the top 
leaves for they are under- 
developed. Not the bottom 
leaves for they are inferior in 
quality. Only the center leaves 
for these are truly mild and 
fully ripe. And that's the fine 
tobacco we use — to make 
Luckies so round, so firm, so 
fully packed — free from loose 
ends that spill out. That's why 
Luckies are always mild, al- 
ways truly mild. And remem- 
ber, "It's toasted"— for throat 
protection — for finer taste. 



Lucky Strike presents the Metropolitan OperaCo. 



Every Saturday at 2 P. M., 
Eastern Standard Time, over 
Red and Blue Networks of 
NBC, Lucky Strike presents the 



Metropolitan Opera Company 
in a complete opera, broadcast 
direct from the Metropolitan 
Opera House in New York. 



CO 



K 



Y 



and only the Center Leaves 



PHOTOGRAPHS 

Gift that only you can give 
Photographer, C. C. Nugget 

cVYTON STUDIO 

rejon Phone M. 477-J 



BISSEL'S PHARMACY 

HENRY E. COPELAND, Prop. 



A Tiger Booster 



Tel. M. 980 Corner Dale and Weber 

PROMPT DELIVERY 



SHEFF & SON 

SUPERIOR FORD SERVICE 
827 N. Tejon M. 1317 




TIGER ROARS 




Double Dribbles 

The Tigers looked good last week 
and practically every man who saw 
action played outstanding ball. It 
was a treat to watch Bully Van de 
Graaff during moments when the 
game was the closest. Bully has a 
habit of reaching for grass during 
these tense moments. Livingston's 
plunge into the orchestra pit ... . 
Riley's being kidded bv the bleach- 
erites at Denver Friday and his 
coolness ... . Harold Berg's too 
many steps .... "Albie" Boothe's 
spectacular guarding .... Captain 
Stone of Denver and his close 
guarding and all-around cool play- 
ing. 



Prognostications 

It has been a long time since we 
have taken pen in hand and tried 
our luck at the old guessing game, 
but here are a few Dre-scores to the 
games to be played this week-end. 
Friday — COLORADO COL- 
LEGE 23 — W. S. 19. Colorado U. 
19 — Teachers 15. 

Saturday — COLORADO COL- 
LEGE 28 — W. S. 24. 

We will even go three months 
hence and dope out the final stand- 
ings of the teams on the eastern 
side of the Rockies. 

Wyoming University 
COLORADO COLLEGE 
Colorado University 
Colorado Aggies 
Western State 
Denver University 
Mines 
Teachers 
Look for plenty of upsets hand- 
ed out by Colorado University. 



Durinsr Hell Week 

at D. U a Beta active staged a 
fake holdup on one of his pledges, 
using a spoon in place of a gun. 
The pledge, all unknowingly, count- 
ered with a right uppercut, causing, 
among other things, a sore jaw. 
All praise he received was from the 
daily papers. 

— Denver Clarion. 

••. ••• ••. 

Rhodes' 

Scholarship Awards were made 
in San Francisco, January eighth. 
Two of the winners were from 
Utah, one being the son of the 
President of B. Y. U. Neither of the 
candidates from Colorado were suc- 
cessful. 

••• *. *. 

A weekly award is given to the 
student who makes the dumbest 
break on the campus of the Univer- 
sity of Colorado. 






THE TIGER 



Friday, January 19, 193' 



THE TIGER 




Editor LEW CROSBY 

Business Manager E. F. STAPLETON 

EDITORIAL STAFF 

Editors: Manacinpr Editor. Bob Johnson: Campus Editor. Joseph Lowe; 
Sports Editors, Harold Marlowe. John Bicknell ; Society Editor, Alice Her- 
BOin ; Makeup Editor, Martin Lejrere : Pictorial Editor, David Dentan ; Ex- 
change Editor. John Dickey ; News Editors. Miller Stroup. Edith Weaver. 
Pen Swan. Albert Stubblefield. Fritz Baker: A. W. S., Ernestine Stroup: 
\V. A. A.. Louie Marie Mason. 

Society staff — Luzilla Eubank, Mildred Fritchle, Muriel McClanahan. 
Sarah Mclntyre. Caroline Morrison. Lyda Roark, Sally Tompkins, Jane 
Walker. Imneene Younir. Makeup staff — Edith Gaylord. Exchange staff — 
Charles Macdonald. Sports staff — Ronald Rolnh. James Ransom. Dick Al- 
son. David Waters. Proof readers — Lucy Blackman. Frances Stevenson. 
News staff — Jake Johnson. David Dentan. Gilbert Ray'is. Alice Sutton. Ln- 
Rue Wiley. Nanet Meredith. Claire Sweany. Elvira Cortellini. Ruth Mary 
Webster. Esther Alexander. Charles Dewinfr, Ken Hall, Jennie Conway. 
Mark Schreiber. Marybel Poer. Ruth Liverman, Marearet Stewart. Ann 
Daniels. Conrad Brown. Dale Ashbauprh, Frank Johnson. Jean James, Doro- 
thy Elston. Helen Miller. Ellen Perry. Susan Braerton, Dick Hall, Emma 
Ionise Jordan, Virginia Botsford. Roberta McKay. 



^ Chapel Snoozers 

were jolted out of their weekly lethargy last Tuesday morning by 
that rare visitant to the COLORADO COLLEGE campus — an interest- 
ing chapel speaker. This would seem to prove that Chapel, like many 
other young people's activities which are dominated by too-mature in- 
fluences, could be made a positive, rather than a negative force in this 
institution. More speakers like Mr. Evans, with his view-point distinctly 
that of the younger generation, could make our student body forget 
that the word "Chapel" was ever prefixed with "compulsory." This 
office has no wish to revive the old discussion of Chapel attendance. 
Indeed, there would be no need of ever returning to the subject if fu- 
ture Chapel hours were patterned after that of last Tuesday. Just as 
the Shove Memorial marks an ideal in material background in compari- 
son with the former gatherings in Perkins Hall, let us hope a similar 
step will be taken in building up the purpose for which the Chapel was 
given. 

^ Support 

of the idea for an all-college musical show to be presented this 
spring has received surprising impetus since it was proposed in these 
pages a week ago. Such an idea is not the product of a few hours 
work or support. If we are to have a measure of success in this pro- 
duction it means not a few hours, nor a few weeks effort, but months 
of sustained drive. Your cooperation is most necessary. Starting the 
new semester right, it would be appropriate to combine our efforts in 
resolving that at a date determined later, we CAN AND WILL BRING 
TO COLORADO COLLEGE THE FIRST ANNUAL ALL-COLLEGE 
MUSICAL SHOW. 



KEYHOLE 
EEPER 



Cigarettes' recent price rise to 
fifteen cents and the rumored two- 
cent additional rise by the end of 
j the week has led to unforseen re- 
I suits on a smoking campus that has 
the evil habit. Loath to cease the 
j pleasant practice, and in most cases 
unable to, the universally poverty 
striken collegians have taken to 
"rolling their own". A five cent 
i package of Bull Durham, apparent- 
I ly the moment's most popular 
brand, and a couple of packages 
of cigarette papers thrown in with 
the nickel outlay, supply about 
forty handmade 'weeds' for the 
price of approximately seven neat- 
ly tailored Camels. 

To successfully hold the white 
paper between thumb and first fin- 
ger, fill the little paper with tobacco, 
then lick the edges of the paper to 
stick it together and seal it so the 
tobacco doesn't roll out or into 
one's mouth, is indeed a complicat- 
ed art that takes the novice many 
many tries to perfect. 



Phi Beta 

Kappa has nominated Utah uni- 
versity as one of four schools to re- 
ceive charters next fall. Final action 
will be taken at the eighteenth na- 
tional council next September. 

— Utah Chronicle. 



They're playing "Suicide Ball" 
over at Boulder. It's a primitive 
form of basketball and promises to 
"play out" at least one each game. 



After the ball is tossed up in center, 
nothing is barred. Mammerlocks, 
up, and hundred yard dashes are 
flying wedges, squeeze plays, piling 
all in vogue — and the object is 
merely to get the ball through the 
hoop, whether by fair means or 
foul. 

— Rocky Mountain Collegian. 



Freshman reporters often hand in 
to editors amusing sketches meant 
by the yearlings in all seriousness. 
Such is the following that came to 
the society editor yesterday: 
Gamma Phi Beta News 

Caroline Morrison 
There is still no Gamma Phi 
news. If anything comes up unex- 
pectedly Julia Sherman said that 
she would have Roberta Winter 
either give it to me or turn it in. 
Caroline 
Keeper's note: What about Helen 
Goodsell coming back next semes- 
ter> 

••••••••• 

And then this juicy little number 
I picked up off the floor where a 
choosy news editor had relegated 
it in disgust: 

"Miss Marion (Simon Legree) 
Feezer drove several of our girls up 
the peak on a wood-gathering lark 
Saturday. In reality it was a regular 
work-out. Not only did they have to 
cut and load the wood on a truck, 
but a small walk of about five miles 
in the snow was included among 
the joyful events of the fray. All in 
all, everybody returned home in the 
"pink" — absolutely frozen." 
■•- .». ... 

Jean James, the Delta Gamma 
pledges' featherweight, had an icy 
experience this week when Monu- 
ment Lake's chilly waters rose to 
envelope her 6 feet 6. skates and 
all. as the ice very suddenly broke. 
Result: two day confinement to her 
Bemis room with ill effects. 



Flip-flop: Fifteen Betas were a 
the Pueblo Congress' dance las 
Friday nite . . . Frannie Lewis ther 
with Carl Maynard and Helen Mc 
Candlish with Kimball . . . Oh, yes 
a couple Phi Gams managed t< 
squeeze in . . . Martin Legere's bes 
gal lives back in Hill City, Kansa 
.... incidentally, her name is Dan 
iels which inspires something or oth 
er. . . another Sig Chi social noti 
and event of importance is Brothe 
Bob Sims' putting his pin on Thetc 
president Marie Hoag . . . the ci 
gars were very lousey two-for-a 
nickel stale the Sigs complained . 
. . as this seems to be rambling intc 
a Sigma Chi week for the Keeper 
the Sig pledges beat the actives ir 
touch football Tuesday with the r& 
suit that the big hearted active! 
give pledges a smoker .... Mar 
guerite Dixon was the first gir 
Johnny Bicknell knew when he 
came to C. C. — isn't it romantic? 



That by 1980 colleges will have| 
abandoned required courses, and all 
students may take whatever sub- 
jects they please and ignore those 
they do not want, is predicted by 
Professor David Snedden of Colum- 
bia university. 



THE EMERY STUDIO 

Fine Portraiture 

Official Nugget Studio 

Plaza Hotel Building 



Shampoo and Finger Wave 
50 cents 

MARY SUTTON 
BEAUTY SHOP 

M. 1186 105 E. Cache la Poudre 



Keep Up with the 
Business World! 



Enroll Now at 



Blair 



O COLLEGE 



De Graff Building 






W. I. LUCAS 

—HAS— 

EVERYTHING IN SPORTINC 
GOODS— 

"Tigers Always Welcome" 

120 North Tejon Street 
Main 900 















Friday, January 19, 1934 




THE TIGER 








XmX m X m X m X m X m X m X m X m >4 m X m X m X m X^ m X m X m X m X m < 


**•**♦**♦**♦**♦**♦*•♦**♦**♦**♦**♦**••*♦**♦**♦**♦ 


? 

y 


jlllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIA 


Say Boys — 






SCHEDULE FOR FINAL EXAMINATIONS 




y 


I PampbelFs 




J* 
t 


FIRST SEMESTER, 1933-34 




y 

y 

T 




1 
1 


9:00 A.M. 


to 12:00 M. 




Y 

t 

♦ 

1 


Barber 
at Shop 




If 

> Friday- 


Saturday 


Monday 


Tuesday 




January 26 


January 27 


January 29 


January 30 


t 

V 


109 East Pikes Peak Ave. 




k Biol. 215 — 38 


Art 101 — P 


Biol. 101 — 38 


Art 210 — P 


i 


E : 




E : 




f Biol. 253 — 42 
>!• Biol 365 — 41 


Bible 101 —BR 
Biol 211 — 38 


Biol. 151 —42 
Bus. 203 — 23 


Bible 105 — BR 
Bus. 103 — 48 


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X Educ. 303 — 35 


Biol. 351 —42 


Chem. 103 — 24 


Bus. 303— 19 




WE WASH 


ft Eng. 233 — 45 
» Eng. 307 — 27 


Bus. 311 — 13 
Chem. 451—27 


Chem. 241 —27 
Civil 201 — C 


Chem. 107 — 24 
Civil 301 — C 


t 
X 


EVERYTHING 


X Fren. 101 a — 28 


Chem. 461 —24 


Econ. 313 — 51 


Econ. 201—3 


Y 
Y 


WITH 


% Geol. 1 Ola — 3 


Civil 407 — C 


Eng. 305 — 37 


Eng. 105a — 28 


♦ 


IVORY SOAP 


1 Germ. 101 a — 22 


Econ. 319 — 23 


Geol. 101b — 3 


Eng. 105b — 30 


f, 




% Greek 111 — 44 


Eng. 221 — 31 


Geol. 203 — C 


Eng. 105c — 27 


? 


THINK 


% Hist. 207 — 52 

y Math. 101 —21 


Eng. 311 — 45 
Fren. 101b — 22 


Germ. 307 — 20 

Hist. 301 — 31 


Eng. 107a — 37 
Eng. 227 — 31 


X 

t 


WHAT THAT 


I Math. 103 — 20 


Fren. 303 — RO 


Hist. 329—19 


Germ. 101c — 22 


Y 


MEANS 


X Math. 122 — 29 


Germ. 101b — 28 


Ital. 201 — 22 


Germ. 201a — 21 


X 




| Phys. 453 — 15 
X P. Science 301—30 


Hist. 101 — 3 & 32 
Hist. 201 — 19 


Math 4.01 — 29 
Phys. 101 — 32 


Greek 101 —44 

Hist. 391 —52 


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Latin 307 — 44 


Phys. 325 — 15 


Math 114 — 20 


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Math. 203 — 20 


Pschy. 201 — 48 


Math 315 — 29 


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Y 
Y 


Math. 301—21 
Sociol. 201— 29&48 


Sociol. 391 — 45 
Span. 305 — 28 


Phil. 201 — 23 
Phys. 105 — 32 




LAUNDRY 


1 

Y 
1 


Span. 201 — 30 




Span. 302 — RO 


- y 

Y 
Y 

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Phones M. 1085-1086 


T 
f 
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Y 

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9:00 A.M. 


to 12:00 M. 




~~~w 












y 

- y 
y 


Couture's 














Wednesday 


Thursday 


Friday 




y 
y 


FRENCH CLEANING & 




£ January 31 


February 1 


February 2 




V 

y 


DYEING CO. 




1 Bible 301 — BR 


Art 105 — 52 


Educ. 301—48 




y 






| Econ. 321 — 23 


Astron. 101 — 21 


Music 101— P 




Y 

y 


We Solicit Your Patronage 




X Eng. 105d — 30 


Biol. 321 —38 






y 

Y 






Y Eng. 105e — 20 
? Eng. 107b — 21 


Biol. 307 — 41 
Bus. 309 — 51 






y 
y 

Y 


218 N. Tejon St. 
Colorado Springs, Colo. 




| Eng. 229—31 


Chem. 225 — 27 






Y 

Y 


Phone Main 1288 




Y Eng. 321—45 

y* Fren. 201b — 22 


Eng. 231 — 31 
Eng. 325 — 45 






Y 










Y 






X Germ. 201b — 28 

I Sociol. 323 — 19 
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Fren. 201a — 22 
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Latin 249 — 44 






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Let Us 




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Math. 121 —20 






x 

Y 


Prepare Your Car 




| 


Phil. 301 — 33 






:| 


for Winter Driving 




Y 


Phys. 205—15 
P. Sci. 201 — 19 






Y 










Y 

V 


Psych. 307 — 48 






y 


Complete Lubrication 




Y 


Span. 101 — 37 






i 
X 


Motor Oils 




1 








t 


Batteries and Repairing 




♦ 








- Y 

y 


Firestone Anti-freeze 
Prestone and Alcohol 




Y 
Y 










y 

y 

y 

♦ 


2:00 P.M. 


to 5:00 P.M. 




Y 
Y 
Y 






4 








" •!♦ 


brake Kelining and Adjusting 




i 








♦ 


Texaco "Fire Chief" Gasoline 




y 


Thursday 


Courses not listed or 


i above schedule 


i 


"Red Head" Car Heaters 




I 
1 


February 1 

Music 103 — P 


will be scheduled b 
structors. 


y individual in- 


I 

Y 

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Ttcf^fowie Tie** 

115-121 N. Nevada 
Phone M. 202 




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•vv 







THE TIGER 



Friday, January 19, 1934 



DUKE UNIVERSITY 

SCHOOL OF MEDICINE 

DURHAM, N. C. 

Four terms of eleven weeks are given each 
year. These may be taken consecutively 
(M. D. in three years) or three terms may 
be taken each year (M. D. in four years). 
The entrance requirements are intelli- 
gence, character and at least two years of 
college work, including the subjects speci- 
fied for Grade A Medical Schools. Cata- 
logues and application forms may be ob- 
tained from the Dean. 



TEXACO 

SUPER SERVICE 
ONE STOP STATION 



WASHING— GREASING 

TIRE REPAIRING 

FIRESTONE TIRES & TUBES 

UNDER MANAGEMENT 

OF BOB PHELPS 

SOUTHEAST CORNER CUCHARAS 

& SOUTH NEVADA AVE. 






Reward's 

^jO Barber 
B Shop 



19 East Bijou Street 



* 



Pack Bags 
Laundry Bags 
Hikers Supplies 

THE OUTWEST 
TENT and AWNING CO. 



M. 1261 



18 E. Kiowa 



To Maintain 
A Payroll in 
Colorado Springs 




1EW 
COAL 

Phone Main 577 





. . that Chesterfield has 

a modern up-to-date Tobacco Factory 

in far-off historic Smyrna 



SO important is the han- 
dling of Turkish tobacco 
in making Chesterfield ciga- 
rettes that Liggett & Myers 
Tobacco Co., maintains this 
specially equipped plant 
right in the heart of the 
famous Smyrna tobacco 
section. It is the largest and 



most modern tobacco 
tory in the Near East. 



fac- 



^ 



Turkish tobacco, you know, ii 
the best "seasoning" there is for 
cigarettes. At all times Chester- 
field has in storage — at this 
plant and in America — about 
350,000 bales of the right kinds* 
of Turkish tobacco. 



© 1934, 

Liggett & Myers 

Tobacco Co. 



Oliesterfield 

the cigarette that's MILDER • the cigarette that TASTES BETTEI 



. "INN" 

ACROSS FROM MURRAY'S 



Strachan's 

SWEET SHOP 

Bijou and Nevada 



IRA C. DUGAN 

Jeweler and Optometrist 

Fine Watch and Clock Repairing 

Eyes Examined — Glasses Fitted 

— Lenses Duplicated — 

Phone Main 1702-J 9 N. Tejon S 





Issued each week during the academic year. Entered at thi'ost Office at Colorado Spring! as Second-Class Matter. 



THE TIGER 



Friday, January 26, 1934 



Colorado College 

TEXT BOOKS 

AND SUPPLIES 

C. C. and Fraternity 

Stationery 

Laundry Bags — $2.00 Each 

Murray Drug Co. 

Across From the Campus 



BERWICK 

ELECTRIC CO. 

Call Main 939, Rear 15 E. Bijou 



PHOTOGRAPHS 

The Gift that only you can give 
Official Photographer, C. C. Nugget 

PAYTON STUDIO 

30 S. Tejon Phone M. 477-J 



WE WASH 
EVERYTHING 
WITH 
IVORY SOAP 

THINK 
WHAT THAT 

MEANS 




On 

Candy 

Counters 

Every 

Place 



The Biggest Nickel's 
worth of GOOD Candy 
You Ever Bought. Try 
It! 



C/i< 




carl 



LAUNDRY 

Phones M. 1085-1086 



rnmtt tmtm msnnmn m t umun^ nr 



Ask Roy 
about It! 

We Sell — Rent — Repair : 
and Exchange 

Every Make 

Typewriter 

AND 

| Adding Machine ; 




The 

Typewriter 

Man 



125 N. Tejon St. 
Phone Main 95 



»n»»»»»»»» » »m»»t:»ii»tt«Kt m 



r 



*\ 



Compliments ^^^m 

of 
FRANK'S PHARMACY 



1501 W. Colorado Avenue 



Phone Main 3361 



V, 



J 



Subscribe NOW for The 

GAZETTE .TELEGRAPH 

Morning — Evening — Sunday ' All The News All The Time 



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Combination 
35c per week 



Ohio co-eds think the ideal man 
should be a cross between a danc- 
ing angle and an intelligent ath- 
lete. 

— Los Angeles Junior Collegian. 



We must get back to the truth 
that education is not training, nor 
is it propaganda. — Dr. Robert E. 
Vinson, president Western Reserve 
University. 




HEAVY food frequently makes sluggish thinkers. So 
take the advice of veteran students and eat Kellogg's 
Rice Krispies — the delicious rice cereal that satis- 
fies hunger without "bogging" you down. 

Those crisp, crunchy bubbles are fine at any 
meal. The way they crackle in milk or cream alwavs 
appeals to the appetite. Nourishing and easy to 
digest. Extra good with canned fruit or honey. 

Ask for Kellogg's Rice Krispies at your campus 
restaurant, fraternity house or eating club. Don't 
forget to enjoy a bowlful after a long study 
session at night. You'll sleep better. Made 
by Kellogg in Battle Creek. 



The most popular ready-to-eat 
cereals served in the dining- 
rooms of American colleges, 
eating-clubs and fraternities are 
made by Kellogg in Battle Creek. 
They include Kellogg's Corn 
Flakes, All-Bran, PEP, Wheat 
Krumbles, and Kellogg's whole 
wheat Biscuit. Also Kaffoe Hag 
Coffee — real coffee — 97% caffeine 
free. 




Listen!— 



RICE 
KRISPIES 



I 




THE TIGER 



/OLUME xxxv: 



i vr* -i 



COLORADO COLLEGE WEEKLY NEWS-MAGAZINE 



Number 17 



♦ e A M P u 



Change 

Last week when Acting President 
-Jershey attended t h e meeting of 
he American Association of Col- 
eges in St. Louis, he found exist- 
ng among the members a dislike 
or the standardization in colleges 
which Dean Hershey has long ex- 
pressed. 




DR. C. B. HERSHEY 

No Babbits for him . . . 

Following this trend of liberiza- 
tion, the North Central Associa- 
tion of Schools and Colleges at its 
spring meeting will probably adopt 
i resolution eliminating minimum 
requirements. 

According to Dr. Hershey the 
revolt from past conditions is ex- 
pressed by saying that "values can 
be secured best in a greater de- 
gree of freedom rather than by 
holding individuals or institutions 
to specific standards and require- 
ments." 



Like A River 

running through the different 
ages, races, and civilizations, re- 
ligion gives it color, direction and 
growth. "The Development of Re- 
ligion" was the general theme in 
the annual excursion of the Medie- 
val and Modern History class and 
of the English Civilization class to 
the Grace Episcopal Church under 
the direction of Rev. Paul Roberts 
last Tuesday night. 

The students observed particu- 
larly the architecture, which is a 
splendid example of Gothic and 
compared it to Shove chapel just 
as fine in its Romanesque form. 
Worship, its ideas, forms, and ob- 
jects used, such as, vestments, can- 
dles, the cross, confessional etc., 
followed by en interesting outline 
of the histoy or the Episcopalians 
from the beginning of Christianity 
in England through the Reforma- 
tion and up to the present time 
gave the students a concise knowl- 
edge of the church. Dr. Roberts 
concluded by explaining the prin- 
ciples of doctrine, forms of service, 
government, and conduct of mem- 
bers as opposed to other denomi- 
nrtions. After the lecture many 
asked questions regarding the sub- 
ject. 

These yearly visits to the Catho- 
lic and Episcopalian churches serve 
as laboratories for the classes illus- 
trating a likeness to medieval 
times. 



Active Acting President of 
COLORADO COLLEGE, Dr. C. B. 

fcrshey delivered two addresses 
during the past week on education- 
al subjects. On Tuesday he spoke 
on "A New Deal in Education" be- 
fore the meeting of the Lions Club 
at the Antlers Hotel. 

Thursday he traveled to Denver 
where he discussed "Avocational 
Education" at a meeting of the 
Round Table Society at the Shir- 
ley-Savoy Hotel. 



(NSFA) — A sum estimated at 
'over $200" is being poured into 
slot machines, derbies, and other 
mechanical gambling devices each 
week by Denison students, a survey 
conducted by The Denisonian, 
which is waging a campaign 
against the practice on the ground 
that the machines are illegal, hav- 
ing been built to issue a package 
of mints for each nickel, which 
they do not do. 



Publications 

of the United States government 
are regularly received at Coburn 
library and it is one of 492 such 
institutions in the United States 
known as government depositories. 
The bulletins, pamphlets and papers 
received from the government print- 
ing offices in Washington, D. C, are 
the property of the government, 
but are placed in key libraries so 
they may be available to the peo- 
ple. 

For a number of years, all the 
publications of the government 
were deposited in each of the des- 
ignated libraries, but such was the 
number that it led to crowding and 
many were allowed to be sent back. 
At the present time, however, there 
are only 36 libraries in the country 
receiving the entire number of pub- 
lications, while the remainder, in- 
cluding Coburn, select in advance 
the publications most suitable for 
the respective districts. This meth- 
od is unsatisfactory, but it elimi- 
nates crowding and saves the ex- 
pense of printing those publications. 



300 Post Cards 

and numerous newspaper notices 
have successfully publicized the 
COLORADO COLLEGE faculty 
lecture series now being held reg- 
ularly in the Pit, which are open 
to the public without charge. 

In addition to having planned 
this facultv-lecturer group, COLO- 
RADO COLLEGE'S committee on 
assemblies and public lectures has 
coonerated with a committee of 
Colorado Springs citizens to ar- 
range the series of dinner lectures 
now being held at the Broadmoor 
hotel with speakers of international 
importance. 

Two of the Broadmoor dinner 
'ectures have been given — one by 
Dr. Anna Louise Strong, who has 
spent most of the last twelve years 
iii Russia, and the other by Dr. 
George Norlin, Colorado univer- 
sity president, who was Roosevelt 
Lecturer on American Life and In- 
stitutions in the University of Ber- 
lin during 1932-33. Over 300 peo- 
nle have attended each of these 
lectures and other dinner affairs 
are being planned by the commit- 
ter to be given during the winter. 
This phase of the college activ- 
ities is an effort to relate the col- 
'ege more effectively to the intel- 
lectual and cultural life of the city 
and community. This sesture on 
the oart of COLORADO COL- 
i LEGE has been enthusiastically 
j welcomed in the city and every ef- 
I fort is being made on the part of 
! the public to cooperate with the 
college in these lecture series. 



Modern 

forms of government are most 
efficient in county governments 
stated Dr. Edith Bramhall in her 
lecture on "Our Government — 
What Can We Do About It," given 
in the pit of Palmer hall Tuesday 
evening. 




The Subject Was: 

"Resolved, That Great Men Are 
More Imoortant Than Economic 
Factors". The occasion was an Ox- 
ford debate held in the meeting of 
the History Club Sunday at the resi- 
dence of Dr. C. B. Malone. 

Alfred Grimwood upheld the af- 
firmative and Charles Dewing the 
negative. During the general discus- 
sion which followed, the chairman 
was forced to use a hammer as a 
gavel to keep the twenty members 
in order. The discussion continued 
while refreshments were served. 



MhnUou Mineral 

W.-ter sales are now supporting 
five last year's COLORADO CO! - 
I EGE graduates with Dave Scott, 
TIGER editor elect, in charge of 
the Denver office. Robert "Swede" 
Roark and Guv Martin, both all- 
conference football stars the sea- 
son of 1932, assist Scott in Denver. 



DR. EDITH C. BRAMHALL 

From the Hoosier state. 

Dr. Edith Bramhall took her A. 
B. work at Indiana University and 
her graduate training was taken at 
Bryn Mawr College, Columbia Uni- 
versity and the University of Penn- 
sylvania. She has been abroad sev- 
eral times for the observation and 
study of foreign governments at 
work; is a member of the Colorado 
Springs City Council and has re- 
cently served on the Governor's 
committee on the Reorganization of 
the government of Colorado. 

"Declining income, not to say the 
absence of income in many cases, 
has compelled us to give attention 
to what has been called the dark 
continent of American politics," Dr. 
Bramhall stated, "It is the cost of 
the thing that appalls us. Taking 
the more than 3,000 counties in the 
United States as a whole, the coun- 
try over, they cost us more than the 
federal government and all the 48 
states combined." 

She stressed the fact that care- 
less auditing was responsible for a 
great deal of the embezzlement of 
money in the county official's offi- 
ces. Politics should be eliminated 
from the county offices and with 
the addition of a county manager 
who has no political interest it 
wculd be possible to eliminate much 
of this fraud that prevails. "We 
should pass an amendment to our 
state statutes that would give our 
counties home rule. Some states 
have already done this. It would 
not be a step into the dark for Col- 
orado — as the state itself may de- 
termine its own form of govern- 
ment and all the cities may — at 
least those of over 2,000 popula- 
tion." 



The Tiger 



Friday, January 26, 1934 



PORTS ♦ 



Howard Waite's Grapplers 

grappled the Colorado University 
wrestling team to a 28-6 score at 
the C. U. gym Saturday in an in- 
teresting but one-sided match. 
Miles, Tiger 135 pound man, de- 
feated Bramley in 7 minutes and 
56 seconds. In the only other win 
for C. C. Haines defeated Stude- 
baker in the 1 75 pound division 
pairing with 6 time advantage. 
Winters, the Tiger's big hope, was 
pinned by Hartman, C. U. in 2 
minutes and 3 seconds. 



Sigma Chi and Kappa Sigma 

turned back the Phi Delta Theta 
and the Campus Independent teams 
by scores of 21-18 and 24-6 re- 
spectively. 

This is the first defeat of the sec- 
ond round for the Phi Delt squad. 
At the half the score stood 10-9 
with the Sigs holding the one point 
advantage. 



Capt. Don Glidden succeeded Les 
Witte of Wyoming as the leading 
basketball scorer in the eastern di- 
vision by scoring 1 5 points in the 
two game series here with Western 
State. ' || 




"Albie" Boothe follows close at 
his heels with a total of 21 points. 
"Albie" has played a spectacular 
brand of ball this season and is 
developing into a first rate basket- 
ball player. 










JOE "ALBIE" BOOTHE 

He's from Missouri. 

Joe is easily the fastest man on 
the squad, and his shiftiness and 
alertness have gained him consider- 
able recognition throughout the 
conference. 



DON GLIDDEN 

"Mighty Midget" 

Don has played a consistent 
brand of ball thus far and as the 
season wears on, he will develop 
into one of the leading forwards 
in the conference. He has scored 
33 points in four starts. 



(NSFA) — All men are born 
with an aggressive hatred to which 
they must give vent. Dr. A. A. Brill, 
noted phychiatrist, declared in a 
recent address at Barnard college. 
"We are willing to obey the 1 a w 
and lead fairly respectable exist- 
ences," the speaker asserted, "but 
when we examine our dreams and 
fantasies we find ourselves killing 
somebody every day." 

— Columbia Spectator. 



.500 

The peans of victory which 
rose from the Auditorium on Fri- 
day evening were drowned in tears 
of defeat as a result of Saturday's 
fatal score. It was one of those 
strange reversals of form which 
changed the Friday evening count 
of 41-19 to a 30-28 loss the fol- 
lowing night. The first evening 
the basket seemed as big as t h e 
Auditorium to the Tiger squad 
with every man on the team scor- 
ing at will while on Saturday night 
it had shrunk considerably and the 
Bengals just couldn't find it. 

Western State's defense com- 
pletely folded up Friday night and 
after the first ten minutes of play 
there was no doubt as to the out- 
come of the game. Patterson was 
high point man of the evening 
with a total of twelve points. The 
entire team played bang-up ball 
with Jim Riley contributing the 
feature of the evening with a long 
one handed shot just outside the 
foul ring. 

The tables turned the following 
night as a different team represent- 
ing Western State returned to the 
hardwood with blood in their eyes 
and played the Tiger boys off their 
feet. They rang up nine points in 
a few minutes and from then on 
out were never headed by a de- 
termined COLORADO COLLEGE 
five. Pederson of Western State 
led his team with eight points and 
for the Tigers, Patterson, Living- 
ston and Boothe were outstanding. 




Always the finest tobaccos and only the 
center leaves are purchased for Lucky 
Strike cigarettes. We don't buy top leaves — 
because those are under-developed. And not 
the bottom leaves — because those are in- 
ferior in quality. The center leaves — for 
which farmers are paid higher prices — are 



Always the Finest Tobacco 



sr 



CoDjrlfibt, 1934, Tbc Aniorlcau Tobacco Company. 



1ZL 



iC me nt/h 'packed cigarette 



The Tiger 




/o 



no loose enas 



as 



leaves. And only center leaves 
making Luckies — so round, so 
om loose ends. That's why every 
vs easily, burns evenly — and is 
I and smooth. Then, too — "It's 
or throat protection — for finer 



f y the Center Leaves 




Lucky Strike presents the 
Metropolitan Opera Company 

Saturday at 1 : 5 5 P. M. , Eastern Standard 
Time, over Red and Blue Networks of 
NBC, LUCKY STRIKE will broadcast 
the Metropolitan Opera Company of New 
York in the complete Opera, "Aida." 



NOT the top leaves — they're under-developed 



The Cream of the Crop 



ZL 




CAMPUS CHIC 

Fur coats, beautiful and rich - - 
the dream of every C. C. co-ed! 

Edith Gaylord wears a brown 
lapin with a turn-up collar, three- 
quarter length, in the latest mode. 
She is lovely in its striking sim- 
plicity. Elizabeth Cheney's fur 
coat is of silver muskrat topped 
with a stunning big collar. Sally 
Tompkins' is a smart black lapin in 
a brown muskrat, elegant and chic. 
A black carracul is suited to Lina 
May Smith's calm poise and blond 
beauty. There is something sophis- 
ticated about good-looking fur 
coats! 

And how many men have not 
envied the collegiate look of Ted 
Wrye and Joe Rustin in their great 

r.-irnniK 3 



Bliss 

Hope Kimzey, ex Colorado Wom- 
an's College, married to James 
Perryman, Sigma Chi, student at 
COLORADO COLLEGE in 1930, in 
Raton N. M. on May 6, 1933. The 
couple will be at home in Golden, 
where Perryman is enrolled in the 
School of Mines. 

Fred Short, Phi Delta Theta, 
class of 1932, was married to Fran- 
ces "Pinky" McCartney at St. Bar- 
nabas church in Denver on Friday, 
Jan 21. After a short trip, the 
Shorts will make their home in 
Trinidad, where Fred Short is af- 
filiated with the White Eagle Oil 
Company. 

Harry "Spic" Spicer, Phi Gam- 
ma Delta, class of 1932, married 
Marion Peterson Saturday, Jan. 22. 
"Spic" Spicer is backfield coach in 
the Athletic department at COLO- 
RADO COLLEGE. 



EXCHANGE 

The Eds and Co-eds of the nine- 
teen major colleges of the United 
States will buy seventeen million 
dollars worth of clothing this 
school year. 

The Major College Market, a 
survey by the Major College Pub- 
lications sat down the other day 
and figured out that t h e college 
man's clothes would cost him about 
seventeen, while the college girl's 
(God spare me from a daughter) 
would cost three million or more, 
or about ten million dollars. 

— New Mexico Lobo. 



f the bottom leaves— they'reinferiorin quality 



THE TIGER 



Friday, January 26, 1934 



THE TIGER 




Editor LEW CROSBY 



Business Manager E. F. STAPLETON 

EDITORIAL STAFF 

Editors: Managing Editor, Bob Johnson; Campus Editor, Joseph Lowe: 
Sports Editors, Harold Marlowe, John Bicknell ; Society Editor, Alice Her- 
som ; Makeup Editor, Martin Legere : Pictorial Editor, David Dentan : Ex- 
change Editor. John Dickey : News Editors, Miller Stroup, Edith Weaver, 
Peg Swan, Alhert Stubblefield, Fritz Baker ; A. W. S., Ernestine Stroup ; 
W. A. A., Louie Marie Mason. 

Society staff — Luzilla Eubank, Mildred Fritchle, Muriel McClanahan, 
Sarah Mclntyre, Caroline Morrison, Lyda Roark, Sally Tompkins, Jane 
Walker, Imogene Young. Makeup staff — Edith Gaylord. Exchange staff — 
Charles Macdonald. Si>orts staff — Ronald Rolph, James Ransom, Dick Al- 
son, David Waters. Proof readers — Lucy Blackman, Frances Stevenson. 
News staff — Jake Johnson. David Dentan, Gilbert Baylis, Alice Sutton, La- 
Rue Wiley. Nanet Meredith, Claire Sweany, Elvira Cortellini, Ruth Mary 
Webster. Esther Alexander, Charles Dewing, Ken Hall, Jennie Conway, 
Mark Schreiber, Marybel Poer, Ruth Liverman, Margaret Stewart, Ann 
Daniels, Conrad Brown, Dale Ashbaugh, Frank Johnson, Jean James, Doro- 
thy Elston, Helen Miller. Ellen Perry. Susan Braerton, Dick Hall, Emma 
Louise Jordan, Virginia Botsford, Roberta McKay. 



KEYHOLE 
EEPER 



Bagatelles: Betty Skidmore re- 
eave Bill Carlile a 



my-heart truth .... Prince Albert 
is getting a play now from the roll- 
your-owners formerly using Bull 
Durham .... As their first joint 
host-playing, Mr. and Mrs. Wrye 
entertained three guests before the 
game Saturday night at a luscious 



cently gave Bill Carlile a flashlight "cheese and" supper in their newly 
to find his way from the Phi Gam taken Monument street apartment 

.... very gracious hosting and 
much fun .... Dr. Blakely in class 
"It makes no difference — just so 



house to the Skidmore house sever- 
al back yards away .... Dodo, 
who has Dave Griffith's pin now, 
promised Griff a light too, to lead 
his way .... and Pauline Hoopes 
is without Don Smith's pin at the 



you get the difference" . . . . th 

Kappa house famous blue and blue 

shower gets regular use from at 



present writing, but it is expected ' east one of the ^terhood - Peg 
back any minute .... Weaver- | ^n retreats tojt regularly and m 
D„ ™ ™J k-; m ,.„_R.^„ k.vp i ner own w °rds, Sometimes I don t 



<^ Dog Days 

for college spirit usually make their appearance about this time of 
the year. Finals take the starch out of otherwise normal college men 
and women and optimistic outlooks towards the future are at an ebb. 
On the other hand, activities sponsored by groups other than the stu- 
dent body would tend toward the view that even at this early date, the 
outlook for the future of COLORADO COLLEGE was never so rosy. 
Contact men will spend the entire second semester and the summer 
months in carrying a friendly message from COLORADO COLLEGE to 
prospective students. Alumni groups have swung into action with an 
enthusiasm which brings memories of years past. The dinner-lectures 
sponsored by COLORADO COLLEGE and the series of faculty lectures 
have both received amazing support by friends of this institution from 
nearly every district in this state. With this background of cooperation, 
we, as principals in this educational structure, should not have to be 
asked for our share of the work. Instead of talking about it, lets GEI 
IN AND WORK. Every man and woman enrolled in COLORADO COL- 
LEGE should start working NOW towards bringing back a new student 
next year. 



I'm Going, are you? 

To the Associated Women Stu- 
dent's dr.nce, February 2, at the 
Broadmoor Hotel and dance to the 
music of Johnny Metzler's Orches- 
tra. Price 40c a person. 

This dance gives the girls a 
chance to ask their date to an all 
college dance. Tickets can be ob- 
tained from members of tne A. W. 
S. board and Jane Kimzey, Julia 
Sherman. Louie Marie Mason, Mar- 
garet Utterback, Norma Garrett, 
Maidie Rothgerber and Harriett En- 
gel. 



(NSFA) — In a survey at Hunter 
college, it was found that of the 
650 freshmen co-eds, only one in- 
tends to marry after graduation. 
The others are planning to work. 

— Swarthmore Phoenix. 



The History Club will meet Sun- 
day, Jan. 21 at 8:00 p. m. at the 
home of Professor Malone, 1211 N. 
Tejon. 

Possibilities 

of important discoveries are pre- 
sent in an experiment set up in the 
chemistry department by Charles 
Bordner, graduate student and lab- 
oratory assistant. 

The experiment, in its simplest 
form, consists of the low tempera- 
ture carbonization of coal by the 
electric furnace and may result in 
the production of coal that will not 
slack. In addition, a by-product of 
the process may be a substance to 
be used in a high-explosive motor 
fuel. 



(NSFA) — Statistics prove that 
married students at Wyoming uni- 
versity get better marks than those 
unattached. 

— Swarthmore Phoenix. 



Perryman and Kimzey-Brady have 
all gone phfft .... Chilcott gave 
Kay Lingham a tremendous wolf 
neckpiece for Christmas .... Liver- 
man passed the candy Monday 
night celebrating receipt of a dia- 
mond from Lamar Price . . . Dwight 
Beery is stepping Charlotte Pender- 
grast, high school gal well-known to 
most students .... Phyllis Maust's 
tremendous heavy-laden eyelashes 
.... rumors of no more Friday 
night dances at the Pueblo Congress 
hostelry. ... a mustache so movie- 
starrish is blooming on John Mihal- 
ick's lip ... . Leonna Dorlac look- 
ing very knockout in a white cardi- 
gan and sweater and navy beret . . 
. . about six rather austere gals who 
you wouldn't expect to do it, sud- 
denly went down in a body, had 
their long hair cut, and are now 
sporting tricky little curls where the 
buns used to be ... . Hal Daniel 
Boone Roach recently borrowed a 
gun from a local doctor to shoot 
pigeons with. He put a shell in it, 
forgot all about it, pulled the trig- 
ger, and imagine his surprise when 
he discovered he'd shot the floor! 
. . . . Marietta Sinton achieves a 
very cute Salvation Army look with 
those black strings tied around her 
chin and ears, thus holding on the 
seventh pair of glasses she's had 
since September. The other six pairs 
were all broken in unique ways — 
once she parked them on the floor 
and her eight year old heavyweight 
brother (133 lbs.) came and stepp- 
ed on them; another time young 
brother decided to beat up on sister, 
so he bashed her between the eyes 
breaking the Full-vues to bits; etc. 
etc. To match her various ensem- 
bles, she alternates between black 
and brown ribbons — (she has two 
hats, one brown and one black) . . 
. . Going to Golden recently to an 
S. A. F. dance. Kay Corning ex- 
perienced the well-known milkman 
reactions on returning to Denver, 
where she was spending the night, 
at 4:30 a. m. — 12 miles from 
Golden to Denver. Her story was at 
least daringly original — four flat 
tires, and she swears it's the cross- 



have any soap, sometimes I don't 
have any towel, and then I just 
stand in front of the window and 
shake" .... can't you picture it? 
and a hand to Sally Tompkins for 
successfully running the Bemis food 
problem in the absence of Miss Kin- 
niburg .... after echo: the bad- 
ness of the food was exaggerated. 

"I'm Through 

with politics" stated William C. 
Hinkley, '32. at the close of the 
last session of the state legislature 
in Denver last week. 

Since graduating from COLO- 
RADO COLLEGE. Hinkley was 
elected on the Democratic ticket to 
the House of Representatives from 
El Paso county. Last fall he se- 
cured a position as instructor in 
the Las Animas schools as manual 
training teacher, but he continued 
his position as state representative 
for this county. 

But while other El Paso repre- 
sentatives drew checks for mileage 
of only $16.25 for attending the 
session in Denver, Hinkley draws 
his mileage money on the basis of 
409 miles round trip from Las Ani- 
mas, at the rate of 16 cents a mile, 
therefore creating much disention 
in the state treasurer's office. 



Visitor 

The California Institute of Tech- 
nology, renouned home of the cos- 
mic ray, is sending Prof. R. W. Sor- 
enson, head of the department of 
Electrical Engineering, to COLO- 
RADO COLLEGE to address sci- 
ence majors in the Pit. Palmer Hall, 
Monday, Feb. 5 at 4 P. M. 

Professor Sorenson will spend 
the day at COLORADO COLLEGE 
visiting the laboratories, meeting 
the faculty, and conferring with 
students in regard to graduate work 
at the institute. His visit is sponsor- 
ed by the School of Natural Sci- 
ences. 






At the University of California 
at Los Angeles candidates for stu- 
dent offices have to be heavily 
guarded by police to protect them 
from being kidnapped by opposing 
forces. 



rid ay, January 26, 1934 



THE TIGER 



j Education is well planned under 
lussolini. You are told not only 
w to think, but also what to 
inL 

fln tiers Hotel 

/ Dinner Dances 

iturdays, starting 7 p. m., $1.50 

plate. After 9, cover charge 

Large 75c for those not having 



nner. 



Have Good 
Deleveloping 

— because no print or 
enlargement can b e 
better than its negative. 
We develop to give you 
most possible from pic- 
tures you take. 



1 




17 N. Tejon 






< 



with 

Clothing Values 

never before 

offered. 



AU our FURMBILT 

Suits and Coats 

in two Prices 



$ 1 O.85?. roken 

J± ^J Lines 

*16- 852 sl 

"Our Replacement Price for 

Spring. Garments will be 

$5.00 Higher" 

FURMBILT Clothes 

P. L. THORSEN, Prop. 
20 N. Tejon St. 




SOCIAL CALENDAR 
Thursday, Feb. 1 — 

Interfraternity basketball. 
Friday, Feb. 2 — 

A. W. S. All-College Dance, 
Broadmoor Hotel 

Examination Teas, Bemis Hall 

C. A. C.-C. C. basketball game 
Saturday, Feb. 3 — 

C. A. C.-C. C. basketball game 



"BUY NOW and Save' 

Wednesday, Jan. 31st 
The End of our 

Wonderful 
Clearance Sale — 



A Studio 

atmosphere was the background 
for the dance given at the Phi Delta 
Theta house on Saturday evening, 
Jan. 22. A speaker system was con- 
nected in all the rooms, and the 
couples danced to the music of the 
ten most outstanding bands in the 
country — by "electrical transcrip- 
tion." 

Graham Husington announced 
the selections, and two high points 
of the program were news flashes 
and comments by 0. 0. Winchel- 
tyre and style notes of the gowns 
worn by the guests given by Mad- 
ame Paul Poiret. 

Chaperons were Dr. and Mrs. 
William C. Service and Prof, and 
Mrs. Arthur G. Sharp, Jr. 



Beta Party 

Last Saturday night, sixteen 
members of Beta Theta Pi and their 
respective dates danced to the syn- 
copations of Bob Mahoney and his 
Antlers' orchestra at the hotel. Be- 
tween dances some of the Beta 
songs were sung by the fraternity 
men. 



Pledges 

of Gamma Phi Beta entertained 

at a tea dance from four to six on 

Friday afternoon, Jan. 21. Tradi- 

i tional tea dance refreshments were 

; served — tea and cookies. The 

; chaperones were Mrs. Loring C. 

Lennox and Prof, and Mrs. Ralph 

J. Gilmore. 



Relaxation 

and entertainment will be of- 
fered to men and women students 
at exam teas to be given in Bemis 
hall from 4:00 to 6:00 beginning 
today. 

Each afternoon a different mem- 
ber of the faculty will act as hos- 
tess: 

Friday, Jan. 26 — Mrs. Louise 
Fauteaux. 

Saturday, Jan. 27 — Miss Marion 
Fezer. 

Monday, Jan. 29 — Miss Lillian 
Jackson. 

Tuesday, Jan. 30 — Mrs. Aiden 
Mullett. 

Wednesday, Jan. 31 — Miss 
Dorothea Carlton. 

Thursday, Feb. 1 — Miss Cather- 
ine Ryan. 



CHAPEL CALENDAR 
Wednesday, Jan. 31, 5:15 p. m. — 

Organ Recital. Dr. Frederick 
Boothroyd. 
Tuesday, Feb. 6, 10:00 a. m. — 

Chapel Service. Speaker, Dr. 
C. B. Hershey, Acting-President. 
Tuesday, Feb. 6, 8:15 p. m. — 

The Colorado Springs Sym- 
phony under the direction of Dr. 
Boothroyd. 

The public cordially invited to 
these programs. 



Congratulations are extended to 
the associated students of the Uni- 
versity of New Mexico at Albuquer- 
que. They have been admitted to 
membership in the National Stu- 
dents Federation of America. 



Carrie Coed's Letters 

Dear Sis — - 

Finals start today, but what do 
I care. A final or two is nothing 
compared to the stress and strain 
of the past two weeks. 

Last Saturday night a whole 
mob of us went to the Antlers. 
Have you ever seen one of these 
rah-rah college movies? Well now 
I know where they get the ideas 
for them — COLORADO COL- 
LEGE. It all started by the Kap- 
pa Sigs who were there in force, 
giving the crowd a choice number 
about Brother Noah. Noted for its 
rhythm and not its artistic merits. 
Their rendition was note-worthy 
from the standpoint of volume if 
nothing else. 

Of course this promoted a little 
competition from the Sigs, who 
were less in number. But with the 
help of Davie Waters they man- 
aged a feeble attempt at their fam- 
ous and lovely sweetheart song. 
After which, the Betas, assisted by 
all present, sang a snappy number 
about when our sons to college go 
or something. They took first place 
from the standpoint of harmony. 

Inspired by the males the Delta 
Gammas started murmuring about 
little ships, and were soon helped 
out in force by the Kappa Sigs and 
Kay Lingham. And then — you 
guessed it — we all got chummy 
and sang Colorado C. men and 
Our Colorado. Very jolly. 

All kidding aside, it was the 
most fun I've had all year. Be- 
sides which I fell in love with a 
guy who is going to help me with 
my Bible final. Must off to the 
drug to meet him now. If I ar- 
rive home in a couple of weeks 
you'll know it's because I didn't 
snap the average for initiation. 
But somehow now that finals are 
actually upon us I can't get very 
properly organized. Must be the 
weather, or the new egg on the 
horizon. Anyhow I have already 
taken a tennis final and received a 
66 on it, which helps the old edu- 
cation along greatly — or so they 
tell me. 

Love and kisses, 

Carrie. 




HANSEN'S 

RADIATOR REPAIR 



HE. Kiowa 



Main 319 



Now Playing- 



NONE OTHER 
THAN - - - 

Clara 



BOW 



in 



'Hoopla' 



RIALTQ 



TOMPKINS Home Owned 



Have your pictures taken now 

Official Photographer for 
the Nugget 

WAGNER-FULTS 

Burns Building 



JIGG'S BARBER 
SHOP 

Haircuts 40c 

106 South Nevada 



Quality "Master"Cleaners 

Only one Quality and the 
Price is uniform 

Mr in 1-8-1-1 10 E. Kiowa 

H. A. Thompson 



THE EMERY STUDIO 

Fine Portraiture 

Official Nugget Studio 

Plaza Hotel Building 



Shampoo and Finger Wave 
50 cents 

MARY SUTTON 
BEAUTY SHOP 

M. 1186 105 E. Cache la Poudre 



THE TIGER 



Friday, January 26, 19} 



The cigarette t/iafs J\llLOJblV 
Me ciyaret/e Iftat ' lAS'ltS BETTER 




e state it 

as our honest belief that the 
tobaccos used in Chesterfield 
are of finer quality— and hence 
of better taste — than in any 
other cigarette at the price. 



(^liesterfi 




~~JJt£i/ ^aM*m . .just try them 



© 1934. Liggett & Myers Tobacco Co. 



(poioM&eED ! Strachan's 



ACROSS FROM MURRAY'S 



SWEET SHOP 

Bijou and Nevada 



IRA C. DUGAN 

Jeweler and Optomctrilt 

Fine Watch and Clock Repairing 

Eyes Examined — Glasses Fitted 

— Lenses Duplicated — 

Phone Main 1702-J 9 N. Tcjon SL 



FREEMAN DUSi 
ABSORBERS 

Sold in all Leading 
Retail Stores 



WEATHER HAT 
CLEANERS 

27 East Kiowa 



TEXACO 

SUPER SERVICE 
ONE STOP STATION 

WASHING — GREASING 

TIRE REPAIRING 

FIRESTONE TIRES & TUBES 

UNDER MANAGEMENT 

OF BOB PHELPS 

SOUTHEAST CORNER CUCHARA 

& SOUTH NEVADA AVE. 



WW* V W W VVWW V V V v v V 



Reward's 

QZ^Barber I 
B Shop 

V_9 



19 East Bijou Street 



* 



Pack Bags 
Laundry Bags 
Hikers Supplies 

THE OUTWEST 
TENT and AWNING CO. 



M. 1261 



18 E. Kiowa 



To Maintain 
A Payroll in 
Colorado Springs 




m 

Phone Main 577 





Where the peak our mighty mascot towers above" 
(See page one) 



Issued each week during the academic year. Entered at the'ost Office at Colorado Sprinus as Second-Class Matter. 




: : . ■: ■ : X :. ■ .:'■ : ' £>:■ '■- ■';'.";..■ '':¥:"' : : ■ 
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Copyrldrt. 1934, 

The American 
TobaccoCumpasy 



Direct from the Metropolitan Opera House 

Saturdayat 1:40 P.M. .Eastern StandardTime.over 
Red and Blue Networks of NBC, LUCKY STR I KJ: 
will broadcast the Metropolitan Opera Company of 
New York in the complete Opera," Die Walkiire." 



THE HEIGHT OF GOOD TASTE 



In making Lucky Strike Cigarettes we 
use the finest Turkish and domestic 
tobacco — and only the center leaves 



for they are the mildest and the most 
tender. And every Lucky is so round, 
so firm, so full packed— no loose ends. 



Always the Finest lohacco | "™, th , Cjmtttr , MVPS 



NOTthetop leaves— they're under-developed 
—they are harsh\ 



"Tlie Cream oftlie Crop 

"The tcntlcrcsi, mildest, s 



ZL 



NOT the bottom leaves — they're inferior 
in quality— coarse and always sardy\ 



VOLUME XXXVI 



THE TIGER 



COLORADO COLLEGE WEEKLY NEWS-MAGAZINE 



Number 18 




Genial 

Prof. H. E. Mathias, informal 
protagonist of the gentle art of 
teaching geology with a sense of 
humor, will use his rotund person- 
ality in wider fields during the en- 
suing semester. With the start of 
the new term most of his efforts 
will be spent in contacting pros- 
pective students of COLORADO 
COLLEGE. 




PROF. H. E. MATHIAS 

"He can take it." 

Mathias, noted for his individu- 
alistic methods of classroom tech- , 
nique and his ability to "take it" 
as well as a penchant for "dishing 
it out", has the distinction of be- j 
ing one of the biggest single fac- 
tors in the COLORADO COLLEGE 
faculty. Tipping the scales at a 
modest "220", he is the personi- 
fication of well-rounded genial per- 
sonality. 

Long outstanding for his liberal 
convictions, Prof. Mathias pro- 
vides a much-needed impetus to 
conservative minded members of 
fthe administration. 

wue Story Squib 

■"he strange tale of the pretty 
coed and the frowning professor 
was told in a news dispatch from 
Washington last week, when Rep. 
Marian Clarke, student at COLO- 
RADO COLLEGE in the days when 
the professor of Public Speaking 
was also the football coach, an- 
nounced that this same professor, 
alias coach, had felt it his duty to 
tell her that she would nevjer be an 
orator. / 

Today as the new representative 
- from New York, Mrs. Clarke holds 
her own with the most gift* d orators 
of the nation and laughingly re- 
members the time when she only 
passed the public speaking course 
by the excellence of her written 
speeches. 

But the astonishing fad rcmaini 
to be told. The blushi c^oed mar- 
ried the frowning profea o\r. 



Silver-Tongued 

Gilbert McClurg has announced 
a series of Monday evening lectures 
on cultural subjects to be delivered 
in Perkins hall during February. 
Ranging from Shakespeare to the 
cliff dwellers, the subjects of the 
lectures will interest a large group 
of students who may obtain course 
tickets for one dollar. 

The titles and dates of the lec- 
tures are: 

I. Monday, February 5; 8: 15 P.M. 
"Shakespeare and England's Bi- 
bles". 

II. Monday, Feb. 12; 8:15 P.M. 
"The Mayflower Pilgrims, 1620- 
1920". 

III. Monday, Feb. 19; 8:15 P. M. 
"Pageant of Colorado Cliff Dwel- 
lers." 

Gilbert McClurg has a national 
reputation as a speaker and lectur- 
er having been aclaimed throughout 
the country for his stimulating talks. 
Tickets for the series may be secur- 
ed from Gilbert McClurg, 619 N. 
Cascade Ave., or Their Pook Shop. 



Seeking 



to clarify the ultimate aims of 
science, Prof. R. W. Sorensen, 
head of the department of electri- [ 
cal engineering at the California In- j 
stitute of Technology, will speak in 
the Pit next Monday on the sub- 
ject; "The Electrical Engineer and 
His Rainbows". The time is set at 
4 o'clock. 

All students who are considering 
graduate work at the institute are 
invited to meet in room 18 at 2 
o'clock to discuss the advantages of 
a technical education with Professor 
Sorensen. 



Broad Minded 

Lewis W. Abt jtt, representative 
OLORAD' COLLEGE faculty 
in Washington, will probably re- 
turn to his professorship in the de- 
partment of Sociology about March 
I . He has been working with a 
committee investigating conditions 
ng agricultural workers, spon- 
sored by the federal agricultural 
administration. 

Investigator Abbott's favorite ex- 
pression is "The greatest thing you 
can learn from my courses is not 
to believe anything you read in 
books." He has never been known 
to treat only one side of a situa- 
tion, and rarely gives a positive 
opinion, preferring in his own 
words to "treat college students as 
capable of making up their own 
m inds." His favorite topic is 
"Communism" — his most ardent 
admirer, a pudgy daschund - - - 
Casper. 



Car Chemist 

Abe Mogilner, chemistry major 
and graduate of COLORADO COL- 
LEGE in the class of '33, left re- 
cently for Detroit where he bas been 
gi v 2n a position in the Chemical 
laboratories of the Chevrolet Motor 
Company. 

The position was secured through 
the influence of Harold Spears, 
chief metalurgist of the Chevrolet 
Co. Spears was a student of Dr. F. 
j Douglas while Professor Douglas 
was teaching at Albion College. 

Mogilner was a major in organic 
and physical chemistry while in 
COLORADO COLLEGE. 



"Our Colorado" 

The COLORADO COLLEGE al- 
ma mater song, "Our Colorado", 
was produced as the result of a 
series of contests held in the years 
1911-12. The words to the song, 
which every freshman soon learns 
and which no alumnus ever for- 
gets, were written by Allison Finch; 
and the music was composed by 
Earl Hille. 

The song is sung at the end of 
football games by members of the 
student body and the chorus, con- 
taining the following lines, never 
fails to appeal to newcomers: 
"For Colorado! Our Colorado! 

Where the Peak our mighty mas- 
cot towers above. 
For Colorado! Our Colorado! 

Here's to thee, our Alma Mater, 
thee we love." 



India, 

land of marble buildings and sac- 
red cows, will be discussed by Miss 
Catherine Gregg, a graduate of 
COLORADO COLLEGE and secre- 
tary of the Indian Y. W. C. A., in 
a talk at the First Presbyterian 
church, Feb. 5 at 7:45 o'clock. 

The lecture will be illustrated 
and tickets may be secured for 25 
cents. 



COLORADO COLLEGE 

in the future, as conceived by an 
artist and architect in December 
1892, is the sketch hanging in the 
outer room of Dr. Hers'hey's offices 
in the Administration building. H. 
G. Ripley is the artist who sketched 
the plan of buildings as they might 
appear in the future. That was be- 
fore there were any buildings on 
the two-block square on which Co- 
burn library, Perkins Fine Arts hall, 
Palmer hall and Shove Memorial 
cnapel stand. It is interesting to note 
that Coburn library is the only 
building constructed according to 
the drawing. 

In the sketch practically all av- 

I ailable space in the square is filled 
with buildings, indicative of the 
high hopes of the artist for the 

I growth of COLORADO COLLEGE. 

I The buildings are nearly all con- 

J nected and resemble greatly an En- 
glish institution in appearance. 
There is a large hall in the approxi- 
mate location of Palmer and a 
chapel where Shove chapel now 
stands, but the shape and size of 
the buildings vary with the draw- 
ing, which is almost a work of art 
itself. 



1934 Model 

Pikes Peak Nugget with a most 
modernistic touch was the promise 
this week of Editor Emma Louise 
Jordan and Business Manager Ben 
(c'm up 'n see me) Carson. Plans 
for the yearbook, usually an open 
topic of discussion, are being car- 
ried out in secret this year. The 
new book is understood to have a 
most original color scheme and 
motif. 

Pictures of individuals and or- 
ganizations must be taken within 
the next few days if they are to be 
included in the publication. This is 
most important as the book must 
go to press in the early part of 
April. This means that it must be 
made up by March 1 . Prizes of 
five dollars each will be given to 
the fraternity and sorority which 
first succeeds in having all its pic- 
tures in. 

Interest is rife concerning the 
annual beauty queen contest car- 
ried on by the Nugget. As yet no 
judges of the contest have been 
announced. 

Pictures may be had from 
Emery's Studio, 1 7 E. Cache la 
Poudre, Wagner-Fults Studio in 
the Burns Building, and the Pay- 
ton Studio at 30 S. Tejon St. 



At Tulane university student 
news reporters were asked to pick 
the ten biggest stories of the year. 
The stories picked weret The 
banking holiday, N. R. A., assas- 
sination of Cermak, repeal of pro- 
hibition. Hitler's anti-Jewish boy- 
cott, gold standard, Cuban revolt, 
Chino-Japanese war, Russian rec- 
ognition by the U. S., and infla- 
tion. 






THE TIGER 



Friday, February 2, 1934 



THE TIGER 




Editor 



LEW CROSBY 



Business Manager E. F. STAPLETON 

EDITORIAL STAFF 

Editors: Managing Editor, Bob Johnson; Campus Editor, Joseph Lowe: 
Sports Editors, Harold Marlowe, John Bicknell ; Society Editor, Alice Her- 
som : Makeup Editor, Martin Legere : Pictorial Editor, David Dentan ; Ex- 
change Editor. John Dickey ; News Editors, Miller Stroup, Edith Weaver, 
Peg Swan, Albert Stubblefield, Fritz Baker ; A. W. S., Ernestine Stroup ; 
W. A. A., Louie Marie Mason. 

Society staff — Luzilla Eubank, Mildred Fritchle, Muriel McCIanahan, 
Sarah Mclntyre, Caroline Morrison, Lyda Roark, Sally Tompkins, Jane 
Walker. Imogens Young. Makeup staff — Edith Gaylord. Exchange staff — 
Charles Macdonald. Sports staff — Ronald Rolph, James Ransom, Dick Al- 
son, David Waters. Proof readers — Lucy Blackman, Frances Stevenson. 
News staff — Jake Johnson. David Dentan, Gilbert Baylis, Alice Sutton, La- 
Rue Wiley. Nanet Meredith, Claire Sweany, Elvira Cortellini, Ruth Mary 
Webster. Esther Alexander, Charles Dewing, Ken Hall, Jennie Conway, 
Mark Schreiber, Marybel Poer. Ruth Liverman, Margaret Stew-art, Ann 
Daniels, Conrad Brown, Dale Ashbaugh, Frank Johnson. Jean James, Doro- 
thy Elston, Helen Miller, Ellen Perry, Susan Braerton, Dick Hall, Emma 
Louise Jordan. Virginia Botsford, Roberta McKay. 



BXCHAMGIb 

A novel volleyball tournament 
is being staged at Western State. 
A sorority and a fraternity joining 
to form a team. This sport has 
been received very enthusiastically i 
by the players and spectators 
alike. 

— Top of the World. 



believe in Communism. The usual 
procedure is to give them a brief 
trial and shorten them at the neck. 
It isn't even safe to mention Com- 
munism. 



••• .»• ■»• 



KEYHOLE 
EEPER 



The Futility of Finals, or Flop- 
ping Flat on One's Face With an 
F, or Fiasco — or anything else sig- | 
nifying dark dismal gloom. After 
such a week of continuous night- 
mares ending up in a funk of fool- 
ery — Jeeves, quick, another word 
beginning with F — I know not 
where to turn nor what to do. 

After studying for three desper- 
ate nights and then bouncing out 
of bed in the morning barely in 
time to make the bluebook hour, 
only to find that one has complete- 
ly forgotten the scant facts that 
he'd so laboriously loaded his en- 
feebled brain with, is one of life's 
lesser trials, which after the first 
disappointment, rapidly changes 
one's attitude to anger at the co- 
lossal stupidity of it all. 

After all, what good are finals? 
(Sotto voice: My profs saying 
"sour grapes"). A medieval, over- 
worked institution that's long out- 
lived its usefulness, finals are grue- 
somely unsatisfactory methods of I 
the prof's determining the power 
of the student to hand back what 
he was given. A ten minute stu- 
dent-teacher conversation could un- 
earth the student's grasp on the 
subject in one-twentieth the time 
and one-hundredth the mental an- 
guish. 

••• ••• ••• 

Surprise, surprise, after such a 
good old gripe a little of the much 
sought after muck comes rolling in 
nibble by nibble — after all, what 
would life or a column be without 
the spice of filth? So which - - - 
this DG Kappa Sig co-operation is 
a bit unfathomable to the generally 
gullible public, including the Keep- 
er: i. e., Jesse James taking Ruth 
Liverman to the dance last night 
.... and now the everpresent tri- 



angle — Conley-Blackman-Steven- 
son .... Muriel McCIanahan is 
Laving our midst for Monmouth, 
111., to attend Monmouth college 
. . . . Ruth Adams running around 
with her hair in iron curler who- 
zises .... incidentally, Bill Agee's 
Wichita gal is being left in the 
temporary lurch for Adams . . . . 
she just can't seem to get enough 
of the Sigs .... Pueblo-baron 
Walters left for Texas recently 
much to A. M. Daniel's dismay . . 
. . the old Label Beer truck on its 
daily trip through Colorado Springs 
from Denver is met by Anne every 
day and a given a letter to be de- 
livered to the Beer-Baron . . . . 
good movie title: Letters on a Beer 
Truck .... Hap Packard is nam- 
ing his first child Abouabhen . . . . 
Persian .... the homeland etc., 
vou know .... add eccentricities: 
Lucy Blackman with Hal Steven- 
son at the dance last night . . . . 
also sister Frannie S. and Bert 

Price From janitor to king 

and still janitor is Ed Johnson's 
saga since he was recently elected 
Phi Delt prex and is yet furnace 
man .... rumors persist that 
Sande Walker is married and that 
Sinton-Gray are marrying in June 
. . . Louise Kirkpatrick is moving 
out of Bemis this semester to live 
alone in town .... "Zee-Zee Lang- 
ston, ertswhile Blue Moon comnany 
director and COLORADO COL- 
LEGE dramatics instructor, sudden- 
ly left town Tuesday .... and so, 
with good old colhtch getting back 
to its usual pipe, may we pray for 
better next week. 



At Michigan State college a re- 
porter asked: "Do you think a 
professor is justified in dismissing 
a student from classes for sleep- 
ing?" Opinions of twelve students 
I were published and the majority 
seemed to think that it was up to 
the professor to make a lecture in- j 
' teresting enough so that students j 
i would keep awake and that if sev- 
! ral went to sleep in class, the pro- i 
j fessor was at fault. (Majority j 

rules ! ) 

■•■ ••• ■•■ 

University of Washington, pro- , 

fessors of this well known institu- I 

tion say that students who aim for j 

, A grades are barren of personality I 

! and that the great horde of C stu- ' 

dents move the world. 



One of the most colorful Alohas 
ever held for any U. of Hawaii 
team was tendered upon their re- 
turn this year after defeating Den- 
ver university. 

••• ••• ••• 

Ted Weems and his orchestra 
have been engaged to play for the 
Junior Prom, February 2, at Mich- 
igan State. 

— Rocky Mt. Collegian. 



Butler university: A new course 
is being offered at that institution 
which is catalogued, "The Art of 
Staying Married." That's one way 
of classifying it. 

••• ••• ••• 

Flash: Rochester University has 
abolished 8:00 o'clock classes, it 
is reported, on the theory that its 
students will be better off sleeping 
in their beds than in the class- 
rooms. 

— Doane Owl. 
••• ••• ••• 

(NSFA) - - Mrs. Roosevelt and 
Secretary of Labor Perkins have 
evinced interest in a plan proposed 
by a college professor's wife that 
all able-bodied youth between 
18 and 26 years should be con- 
scripted into a vast class called the 
commons to grow and process food, 
run the nation's transportation 
systems and basic industries and 
supply the entire population with 
food, clothing, shelter and trans- 
; portation without cost. On reach- 
| ins 26 years, after eight years of 
I public service, the "commoner" be- 
comes a member of the capitals. 
; The necessaries are provided to 
I him but luxuries will be produced 
I under the capitalistic system as at 
present. He must work if he wants 
■ an automobile, a fur coat for his 
wife, caviar for the table, or a trip 
; to Florida in the winter. The plan 
would solve the educational upset 
by conscription of youth just out 
of public school by arranging for 
night college work and completion 
of higher education after gradua- 
tion. — N. Y. Evening Sun. 
••• »•• ••• 

My vagabond stooge cables that 
China is unsafe for students who 



Training Students 

New York, N. Y. (NSFA)— The 
importance of colleges and univer- 
sities in preparing students for the 1 
increase in leisure time, resulting! 
partially from unemployment, and 
in educating them to use it in sat- 
isfying ways will be one of t h ej 
topics discussed under the title, 
"Facing the Crisis in Education", 
at the Ninth Annual Congress of 
the National Student Federation. 

An Essay Contest for college stu- 
dents, sponsored by the Federation 
at the end of the last college year, 
marked its first attempt to secure 
an expression from students of a 
constructive plan for occupying un- 
employed college graduates and atj 
the same time make it possible for) 
them to contribute to the commun- 
ity the benefit which they had de- 
derived from a college education. 
Cooperating in the contest through 
its Executive Officer. Col. H. Ed- 
mund Bullis, was the National Com- 
mittee for Mental Hygiene which is 
undertaking an exhaustive study of 
the effect of unemployment on the 
mental health of college graduates. 
Colonel Bullis, in a recent radio ad- 
dress under the auspices of the 
National Student Federation, 
placed much of the blame for the 
maladjustment of graduates with- 
out jobs upon the college adminis- 
tration, which in most cases not 
only ignores the prevalence of un- 
employment, but continues even 
now to give students the impres- 
sion that they will receive from 
their work the same financial return 
which the prosperity of a few years 
ago might have led them to expect. 

(NSFA) — We are infinite 
cheered by the disclosure of D 
David Segel of the Federal Boar 
of Education, that the myth about 
the 12-year-o'd average intelligence 
.mencans is exploded. The av- 
era± e really comes out to about 1 7, 
becau>r there are 3,000,000 at the 
1 2-year level and about 40.000.000 
at 1 7 or above mentally. Of t h e 
latter group about 10.000.000 are 
awfully smart fellows because their 
average is above 23. 

— Daily Trojan. 

••• ••• •*• 

(NSFA) - The University of 
Arizona finds it necessary to sub- 
stitute outside clerical assistance 
for student employees when it 
comes to mimeographing questions 
for examinations. 

— Arizona Wildcat. 

•*. •*. <Oi 

(NSF'A) — In England there is a 
college with a staff of forty pro- 
fessors, although the student en- 
rollmen is never over eighteen. 
— Carnegie Tartan. 



Ti 
BF 
K 

in 
Tr 



I 






\ Friday, February 2, 1934 



THE TIGER 



"WHEN A FELLER 
NEEDS A FRIEND" 




There's genial sunshine and comfort in 
BRIGGS Pipe Mixture ... the delightful 
new tobacco that is winning smokers every- 
where. Mellowed in the wood for years, 
until it's biteless, mild, and rare in flavor! 
Try a tin of BRIGGS and let it talk in 
your pipe instead of in print. 




KEPT FACTORY FRESH 

by inner lining of 

CELLOPHANE 




© P. Lorillard Co., Inc. 



THE DENTAN 
PRINTING CO. 


COLORADO SPRINGS 


qJ 


/printers 






W. I LUCAS 

—HAS— 

EVERYTHING IN SPORTINC 
GOODS— 

"Tigers Always Welcome" 

120 North Tejon Street 
Main 900 



STANLEY RYERSON 

Fit again after bum breaks. 

Stan Ryerson 

The C. C. lineup will be strength- 
ened somewhat with the return of 
this crack guard in a few weeks. 
Stan fractured two bones in his leg 
about seven weeks ago and will be 
available for action next week. 
Stan's first appearance upon the 
court this year looked good when 
he held Romney to a two point rec- 
ord in the first D. A. C. game. 



(NSFA) — Dr. George Barton 
Cutton recently presented to his 
students at Colgate University the 
possibility of changing time of the 
college vacation to the winter 
months between December and 
April. Dr. Cutton explained that 
the change in time of the college 
vacation would be especially prac- 
ticable at Colgate because of the 
cold, unpopular winters which are 
experienced at Hamilton. The pres- 
ent school year is merely followed 
through tradition, said Dr. Cutton, 
and there really is no serious rea- 
son why the year should not be 
mapped out so that the students 
could attend classes during the 
pleasantest weather. 

— Colgate Maroon. 
.«. .«. .». 

(NSFA) — Students at Connect- 
icut State College demand half 
royalties on examination papers 
which are sold to humor publica- 
tions. 

—Wilson Billboard. 



(NSFA) — At Stanford coeds 
must pass a physical examination 
before they are allowed to stay out 
until 12 o'clock on week nights 
and until 1 :30 on Saturday niights. 
— Carnegie Tartan. 



(NSFA) — Eighty-four courses 
in physical education alone are of- 
fered at the Colorado State Teach- 
ers College. These include such 
courses as speedball, touchball, 
volleyball, playground baseball, 
clog dancing, natural dancing, 
scarf dancing, folk dancing and 
dancing technique. 

— Haverford News. 



Have your pictures taken now 

Official Photographer for 
the Nugget 

WAGNER-FULTS 

Chief Building 



WEATHER HAT 
WORKS 

27 East Kiowa 



THE 

CRISSEY & FOWLER 

LUMBER CO. 

Phone Main 101 
117-129 W. Vermijo 



The best way to tell of the 
beauty of Colorado, Stand- 
ley's Color Pictures, Hand- 
Colored — 35 cents up. 

H.L.Statidley 

PHOTOGRAPHER 



224 No. Tejon St. 

Colorado Springs 



♦ 
i 



BISSEL/S PHARMACY 

HENRY E. COPELAND, Prop. 



A Tiger Booster 



Tel. M. 980 Corner Dale and Weber 

PROMPT DELIVERY 




On 

Candy 

Counters 

Every 

Place 



The Biggest Nickel's 
worth of GOOD Candy 
You Ever Bought. Try 
It! 



THE TIGER 



Friday, February 2, 1934 



(tp?*V» *5 00 



rw*?y 



?&n..**60 ISxZ* 



ANY WAY 
YOU FIGURE 

Up -to -the -neck in studies 
... or head-over-heels in 
prom-time! Any time is PEP 
time. Toasted flakes of wheat. 
Ready to eat. Easy to digest. 
Quick to release energy. Just 
pour on milk or cream . . . 
and dive in! 

PEP has enough extra bran 
to be mildly laxative. Helps 
keep the body fit and regu- 
lar. A swell bite at night too. 
Satisfying — not heavy. Won't 
interfere with sound sleep. 

Get PEP at the campus 
lunch or canteen. Always 
fresh in the individual pack- 
ages. Made by Kellogg ^r^ 
in Battle Creek. 



"'C'r 



PEP 



m 

m 



pUvd 



1Mb 



BRW* 



Keep g° in l 



HANSEN'S 

RADIATOR REPAIR 
HE. Kiowa Main 319 



PORT 





RICHARD HARTER 

"Punk" 
Harter playing his first season of 
regular basketball, has turned in 
several very creditable perform- 
ances. His all-around cool play- 
ing and fast getting around have 



gained him a reputation as one of 
the outstanding men on the 1934 
Tiger machine. 



It looks as though the Phi Gams 
and the Sigma Chis will play again 
for the All Interfraternity basketball 
champioinship next month as the 
middle of the second round is draw- 
ing near. The Phi Delts and the 
Betas looked good at the beginning 
of the round but both teams have 
j lost games with the Fijis and the 
Sigs being the only teoms who have 
perfect records. With examinations 
over and a new semester starting, 
the interfraternity schedule will be 
renewed next week with the Greek 
fives' return to the hardwood. 



PHOTOGRAPHS 

The Gift that only you can give 
Official Photographer, C. C. Nugg 

PAYTON STUDIO 

30 S. Tejon Phone M. 477 



I TEXACO 

% SUPER SERVICE 

% ONE STOP STATION 



"JUMPING" JACK LIVINGSTON 

He seldom misses. 

Jack thus far has turned in sev- 
eral first rate performances. He 
follows the ball and is in there 
scrapping every minute of the 
game. He has scored 21 points in 
conference competition up to date, 
?nd his long arched shots are the 
most sensational part of his play- 
ing. Jack's long shot just before 
the gun in the Western State game 
last week missed the rim by inches. 
What a hero he would have been 
had this shot swished the net. 



The basketeers of COLORADO 
COLLEGE will continue hardwood 
activity this evening and tomorrow 
evening, this time exchanging bas- 
kets with the strong C. A. C. team. 
Both team: are tied for second 
nlace in conference standings and 
due to the equal strength of the two 
fives, both games will be decided by 
a few points. 

The past week has seen Colorado 
University bow down twice to the 
invincible Wyoming five who are 
headed for another championship 
on the eastern side of the Rockies. 
The nucleus of this team is built 
around Les Witte who just can't be 
stopped. The Tigers play the Cow- j 
boys next week at Wyoming and no ; 
doubt a number of C. C. followers I 
will acompany the team to Wyom- 
ing's Hell's Half Acre. 



WASHING— GREASING 

TIRE REPAIRING 

FIRESTONE TIRES & TUBES 

UNDER MANAGEMENT 

OF BOB PHELPS 

£ SOUTHEAST CORNER CUCHARAS 

*. & SOUTH NEVADA AVE. 
J. 



Couture's 

FRENCH CLEANING & 

We Solicit Your Patronage 
DYEING CO. 



218 N. Tcjon St. 

Coin ado Springs, Colo. 

Phone Main 1288 




THE EMERY STUDIO 

Fine Portraiture 

Official Nugget Studio 

Plaza Hotel Building 



f 



ntlers Hotel 

Dinner Dances 



Saturdays, starting 7 p. m., $1.50 
a plate. After 9, cover charge 
charge 75c for those not having 
dinner. 

SHEFF & SON 

SUPERIOR FORD SERVICE 
827 N. Tejon M. 1317 



«!• iMiiiiiiiiiimiiiiimi illinium minium 



Say Boys 



PampbelFs 
Barber 



Sh. 



op 

109 East Pikes Peak Ave. 




Let Us 

Prepare Your Car 

for Winter Driving 



Complete Lubrication 

Motor Oils 

Batteries and Repairing 

Firestone Anti-freeze 

Prestone and Alcohol 



Brake Rehning and Adjusl mst 

Texaco "Fire Chief" Gasoline 

"Red Head" Car Heaters 

TTre#fon« Ttne* 

115-121 N. Nevada 
Phone M. 202 



Friday, February 2, 1934 



THE TIGER 



COLLEGE SWIM CLASSES 

jr. M. C. A. Pool 

Full Credit in Physical Ed. 

[This semester's course will include 

beginning and Advanced Swim- 

ning, Diving, Swimming Team, 

Ind Life Saving. Special fee also 

licludes full "Y" Privileges. 

Register Saturday 



(Bu-leeze, my dear . .. 

yUstrain ffiurselfl 

P 



They say that "No Nice Girl 
Swears." Be that as it may, 

no smart-looking girl wiggles! 

This Vassarette Girdle is gentle 

» . . but effective. It will make 
"jour sleek fall clothes look that 
much sleeker. Get the little slip- 
over Vassarette Bandeau, too. . . 
they're partners in this better 

figure business. 

VASSARETTE 

FOUNDATIONS 



$5 and 7-50 

Bandeaux — $1 and $2 

Kaufman's 

DEPARTMENT STORE 

Second Floor 



OCIAL 



The Social Calendar. 

Friday, February 2nd. 

Tea Dance — Gamma Phi Beta 

C. A. C. vs. C. C. — here. 

A. W. S. Dance — Broadmoor 
Hotel. 
Saturday, February 3rd. 

C. A. C. vs. C. C. — here. 
Friday, February 9 

Delta Gamma Tea for Alumnae 

Wyoming vs. C. C. — Laramie. 
Saturday, February 10 

Wyoming vs. C. C. — Laramie 




Exotic 

personality of the famed Span- 
ish dancer, Carola Goya, prevaded 
the tea given in her honor at Be- 
mis Hall on Wednesday afternoon, 
Jan. 31. Those in the receiving 
line were Carola Goya, Miss Ruth 
Bufort, Dean Louise Fauteaux, 
Mrs. R. 0. Giddings, Miss Maria 
Fielding, and Miss Dena Coyle. 
Those who assisted were the Misses 
Jane Knowles, Betty Hanford, 
Gratia Belle Blackmail, and Con- 
stance Postlethwaite. 




CAMPUS CHIC 

Dashing hither and thither one 
notices various tidbits of fashion, 
among which are the coy little new 
baby bonnets worn by Sandy 
Walker and Julia Dunham. These 
new "off-the-face" hate make one 
look very wide-eyed and innocent, 
and the total effect is quite charm- 
ing. 

Among the many goodlooking 
after-dark dresses seen at the Phi 
Delt studio dance were — Martha 
Kelly's smart new star-dust satin, 
ankle length gown with graceful 
puffed sleeves, and Helen Miller's 
slim velvet frock topped with a 
white lapin cape fastened with a 
large lapin button. 

Who could help but be proud of 
our beautiful co-eds who modeled 
in the fashion show at one of our 
better theatres: Mary Jean Mac- 
Donald, Elizabeth Evans, and Dor- 
othy Weaver were all lovely in the 
different fur fashions that they 
displayed, and what fur coats they 
were! 

Maidie Rothgerber always looks 
the personification of Campus Chic 
around school and also out of 
school. Her tricky gray squirrel 
jaacket coat sets off her dark warm 



beauty. She also has a very spe- 
cial-looking peach colored crepe 
afternoon dress with striking green, 
brown, and white striped scarf and 
cuffs. 



Carrie Co-Ed's Letter 

Dear Sis, 

At last they're over! Yes, I 
mean finals, and is everybody re- 
lieved! The only bright spots in 
were given by the various members 
of the dormitories' staff. They 
really were lots of fun, and I al- 
ways feel so much better after 
drinking a cup of hot cholocate 
and sampling a few ( ?) cookies. 

And did everybody have fun 
after all finals were over relaxing 
at the A. W. S. dance! They are 
always so much fun, and simply 
EVERYBODY was there last night. 
The Hotel looked like the front 
steps of Palmer on a warm sun- 
ny day, only different. 

I must tell you about the thrill 
I had Thursday night! We went to 
see the Spanish dancer, Goya, at 
the City Aud, and she is positively 
breath taking! I dreamed about 
castanets, whirling ruffles, and 
twinkling toes all night. 

The Spring weather that we're 
having makes one think of all the 
new clothes that it would be nice 
to have ..... You might broach 
the subject gently. 

Love, 



WE WASH 
EVERYTHING 
WITH 
IVORY SOAP 

THINK 
WHAT THAT 

MEANS 



CAi 




carl 



LAUNDRY 

Phones M. 1085-1086 



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1501 W. Colorado Avenue 



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THE TIGER 







© 1934. 
Liggett & Myers : i 
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Bijou and Nevada 



Friday, February 2, 193- 



Quality "Master'Tleaners 

Only one Quality and the 
Price is uniform 

M in 1-8-1 -I 10 E. Kiow 

H. A. Thompson 



Colorado College 

TEXT BOOKS 

AND SUPPLIES 

C. C. and Fraternity 

Stationery 

Laundry Bags — $2.00 Each 

Murray Drug Co. 

Across From the Campus 



i 



BERWICK 

ELECTRIC CO. 

Call Main 939, Rear 15 E. Bijo 



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fioward's 

CL/^ 1 Barber 
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! 19 East Bijou Street 



Pack Bags 
Laundry Bags 
Hikers Supplies 

THE OUTWEST 

TENT and AWNING CO. 

M. 1261 18 E. Kiowa 



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To Maintain 
A Payroll in 
Colorado Springs 



IRA C. DUGAN 

Jeweler and Optometrist 

Fine Watch and Clock Repairing 

Eyes Examined — Glasses Fitted 

— Lenses Duplicated — 

Phone Main 1702-J 9 N. Tcjon St. 




COAL/ 

Phone Main 577 





Colonial Ball ©ancers 



(See Page One) 



Iuued each week during the academic year. Entered at the »ost Office at Colorado Spring! aa Second-Claai Matter. 



THE TIGER 



Granting 

that college students are human, 
Acting-President C. B. Hershey in 
his Tuesday chapel talk, offered ad- 
vice to the students on "How to be 
Divine". 

"The machine age," he said, "has 
intensified the problem of the use of I 
leisure." The opportunity for in- 
tellectual stimulation and develop- 
ment offered by this increased lei- 
sure will make the place of the lib- 
eral arts college of increasing im- 
portance in the future. Thus each 
individual will be given the oppor- 
tunity to develop his own person- 
ality unhampered by excessive 
physical labor. 



W. A. A. 

Shuffleboard laurels were won by 
Lois May Lear last Sunday night 
when she and Ruth Crawford play- 
ed off the final match of the tourna- 
ment. Before the members of W. A. 
A. Preceding the game a business 
meeting was held at which it was 
decided that each girl should have 
a solio made for the Nugget. Plans 
for the swimming meet, in charge oi 
Clara Haeker, which is to take place 
the seventeenth, and Play Day at 
Wyoming were topics under dis- 
cussion. Tenniquoit, bridge, jigsaw 
puzzles, ping pong, and shuffle- 
board followed an excellent chile 
supper «erved by Jear> '"rawford, 
Dorothy Elston, and Helen Margar- 
et Shaw. 

••• ■•- ■•■ 

Birthday candles and presents 
will be in order at the W. A. A. 
house next Wednesday, for on Val- 
entine's Day members of the or- 
ganization will celebrate. The en- 
tertainment committee headed by 
Anne Espe includes Eileen Hale, El- 
pha Bowman, Charhne Clark, and 
Mary Jo Sparkman. Martha Statton 
is in charge of the decoration com- 
mittee which numbers Pauline Kur- 
achi, Harriette Kearney, and Paul- 
ine Johnson. Food will be in charge 
of Genevieve Affolter, Norma Gar- 
rett, and Louie Marie Mason. Lois 
May Lear, Doris Wylie, and Rober- 
ta Tapley have the honorable job 

of cleaning up. 

••• .«. ••• 

Modern Paul Reveres took to 
their horses last Sunday morning 
and surveyed the territory of the 
Garden of the Gods. The bold band 
included Mary Jo Sparkman, Coral 
Sherwood, Audrey Gill, Nannette 
Meredith, Ruth Crawford, Jean 
Crawford. Francesca Hall, and Lou- 
ie Marie Mason. 



Birthday Supper 

Mrs. Russell Hunter entertained 
at a birthday party in honor of her 
niece. Miss Priscilla Swan, on Sun- 
day evening. Feb. 4, at the Cliff 
House in Manitou. A buffet supper 
was served, and afterwards the 
guests danced or played bridge. 




-* e P^e tobacco a 

• J hats COOL 




i 



a sensible package 
10 cents 



i 



^^^m :■■;■■;■:'■ , ■■;,■ .-v||ar 

(^rangfer Rough Cut 

the pipe tobacco that's MILD 
the pipe tobacco that's COOL 



© 1934, Liggett & Myers Tobacco Co. 



—folks seem to like it 



Quality "Master"Cleaners 



PHOTOGRAPHS 
HANSEN S The Gift that only you can give 

Only one Quality and the RADIATOR REPAIR i Official Photographer, C. C. Nugget 

VI in 1-8-1-1 " °10 E. Kiowa I 11 E. Kiowa Main 319 | PAYTON STUDIO 

30 S. Tejon Phone M. 477-J 



H. A. Thompson 



VOLUME XXXVI 



THE TIGER 



COLORADO COLLEGE WEEKLY NEWS-MAGAZINE 



Number 19 



♦ e A M P u 



Colonial Ball 

the crowning event on the social 
calendar of the Associated Women 
Students, is beginning to occupy the 
minds of the C. C. women as one of 
their greatest current problems. The 
place is Bemis Commons and the 
date is February 23. 




Prexy Sharp 

presiding over the February 
meeting of the Interfraternity coun- 
cil held in Cossitt commons Monday 
evening to transact the business 
coming before the greek representa- 
tives. 

Plans are being made to organ- 
ize many different all-college activ- 
ities to be held through the remain- 
der of the semester. 

John Bicknell was elected secre- 
tary of the council due to the with- 
drawal of Jack Conley. 



VIRGINIA BERGER 

"Best and biggest Colonial Ball - 

According to reports emanating 
from Chairwoman Virginia Berger, 
this is to be not only one of the best 
of like functions in recent years but 
is also to be one of the most pre- 
tentious. An interesting program 
has been planned which will include 
a minuet presented by the soph- 
more girls as the featured event of 
the evening. 

The co-eds have been searching 
assidiously for the past few days for 
the proper and authentic costume 
in which they can appear for the 
ball. Those who are not as success- 
ful as the others in their search will 
appear in the conventional formals. 



Tradition Upheld 

By observing a tradition that has 
existed in COLORADO COLLEGE 
for many years, Mrs. Louise W. 
■ auteaux, dean of women, assisted 
Vy different faculty members living 
in the halls, served tea to many 
members of both the faculty and 
student body every afternoon dur- 
ing the final week from 4 p.m. to 
6 p.m. 

In the past the informal teas of 
the week were given in Ticknor 
study now closed, but this year tea 
was served in the commons of Bem- 
is Hall. 



Musical 

The Colorado Springs Symphony 
Ensemble and musician Frederick 
Boothroyd of COLORADO COL- 
LEGE presented their second con- 
cert of the year in the Shove Chap- 
el Tuesday evening to a packed 
auditorium of musical followers of 
Colorado Springs. The stellar event 
of the evening's program was the 
rendition of Goldmark's Concerto 
for Violin and Orchestra, in all 
three movements, by Robert Gross, 
ol Pueblo. Gross proved, not only 
his talent, but also an unerring 
memory by playing the selection en- 
tirely without the aid of written 
music. The climax of the selection 
was the tempest, in the last number, 
which according to the idea of the 
critics present, left the audience 
gasping for breath. 



Runners Up 

COLORADO COLLEGE was sec- 
ond in the number of students en- 
rolled in journalism courses in Col- 
rado's colleges during the fall sem- 
ester of 1933, according to the an- 
nual year book of Edito and Pub- 
lisher, the newspaperman's publica- 
tion. 

Only the University of Colorado 
had a higher number of journalism 
students, having 98. It has a school 
of journalism, which is widely ad- 
vertised, while COLORADO COL- 
LEGE, with 33 students enrolled, 
has only two courses and a part 
time instructor. Colorado Woman's 
college is third with 31 and Colo- 
rado Agricultural college is fourth 
with 22 journalism students. 

J. F. Lawson, city editor of the 
Colorado Springs Gazette and wide- 
ly experienced newspaper man, is 
instructor of the courses at C. C. 



Pledges 

Second semester rushing, bidding 

I and pledging by the sororities took 

' place quickly and quietly during the 

past week-end. Informal pledging 

was held on Monday afternoon. 

ihe Delta Gammas announce the 
pledging of Nancy Dugdale of Den- 
ver. 

Kappa Alpha Theta pladged Fan- 
ny Bulkley of Ft. Lupton, Ernestine 
Stroup of Colorado Springs, and 
! Patricia Warren of Colorado 
1 Springs. 

Kappa Kappa Gamma announces 
the pledging of Catherine McCuan 
i of Colorado Springs. 



Black Ribbons 

are being worn under Delta Gam- 
ma anchors all over the country in 
memory of Miss Eva Dodd, one of 
the Delta Gamma founders, who 
passed away in her home in Kos- 
ciusko, Miss., on Jan. 28. Mourn- 
ing will be observed for thirty days, 
and during this time no entertain- 
ing will be done by the Delta Gam- 
ma chapter. 



Biography 

Head librarian of Coburn Library 
for 25 years, the late Manly Dayton 
Ormes, previous to his death 
authored the "Book of Colorado 
Springs" which has just been pub- 
lished by the Dentan Printing Com- 
pany. 

A result of many years of survey 
and study is the "Book of Colorado 
Springs" comprising the back- 
ground of the settlement of the 
Pikes Peak region, the story or 
the founding of the City of Colo- 
rado Springs, some biographical 
sketches of the notable 
pioneers of the region, an account 
of the civic institutions, hospitals, 
churches, clubs and educational, 
literary, musical and artistic enter- 
prises that have been organized and 
have thrived through the history of 
this region. 



Mervin L. Zigler '33, is now em- 
ployed by the brokerage firm of 
Goodbody and Company, members 
of the New York Stock Exchange 
and the New York Curb Exchange. 



Cubs 

24 new students were added to 
the enrollment of the COLORADO 
COLLEGE student body with the 
beginning of the second semester. 
With one exception, Robert Hardy 
of Galesburg, Illinois, they are all 
from Colorado. Eleven make their 
home in Colorado Springs, five 
come from Denver, two each from 
Grand Junction and Alamosa, and 
one each from Montrose, Brush, 
and Golden. 

New Freshmen number Paul 
Cook, Katherine McCuan, and 
Harold Stevenson, a 1 1 from Colo- 
rado Springs; George Calkins, Nan- 
cy Dugdale, Gordon Gallup and 
Bill Morrison from Denver; Mary 
Warren and Charles Shakespeare 
from Alamosa, and Lois Didrickson, 
Montrose. 

New Sophomores include Eliza- 
beth Harrington and Orville Train- 
er from Colorado Springs; Alfred 
Cronk, Grand Junction, and Rob- 
ert Hardy, Galesburg, 111. 

The second largest enrollment is 
found in the Junior class with Mar- 
jorie Huelsman and Lewis Michaels 
of Colorado Springs; Lois Hinkley, 
Golden; William Rhodes, Denver 
and Yyatt Wood, Grand Junction. 

Two Seniors enrolled, both of 
them returning students. They are 
Helen Goodsell of Colorado Springs 
and Emanuel Martin, Brush. 

Mrs. Martha Dazier, Henry Dez- 
nich and Mrs. Jeannette Dresser, 
all of Colorado Springs are en- 
rolled as second semester graduate 
students. 



More Pledging 

Not to be out-done by the weak- 
er (?) sex, the men's fraternities 
busied themselves during the past 
week-end and at 10:00 o'clock on 
Saturday night "put the buttons" 
on their respective pledges. 

Beta Theta Pi announces the 
pledging of Alfred Kronk of Fruita, 
Colorado. 

Kappa Sigma pledged Charles 
Shakespeare of Alamosa, Colorado, 
and Orville Trainer of Colorado 
Springs. 

Phi Delta Theta announces the 
pledging of George Calkins of Den- 
ver, Robert Hardy of Galesburg. 
Illinois, Lewis Michaels and Harold 
Stevenson of Colorado Springs, and 
William Morrison of Denver. 



Dett 
Grieg 



Raff 



Euterpe to Meet 

The Euterpe Musical society of 

COLORADO COLLEGE will meet 

Tuesday evening, February 13, at 

I the home of D. W. Crabb, 1920 

North Corona, at 7:30 p. m. 

Following the business meeting 
the usual musical program will be 
given. The program includes: 
Piano : 

Juba Dance 
Butterfly 

Marguerite Dixon 
Violin : 

Cavatina - 

Carl Munday 
Mrs. M. Read, accompanist 
Soprano : 

Song of Songs 

L'Amour Toujours, L'Amour - 
- Friml 
Laura-Eloise Lilley 
Frances Pond, accompanist 
I Violin : 

The Swan - - Saint-Saens 
Souvenir - Drdla 

Carl Munday 
Mrs. M. Read, accompanist 
Piano: 

Improvisation 

Jean Miller 



Friday, February 9, 1934 



THE TIGER 



THE TIGER 




Editor 



LEW CROSBY 



Business Manager E. F. STAPLETON 

EDITORIAL STAFF 

Editors: Managing Editor, Bob Johnson; Campus Editor. Joseph Lowe; 
Sports Editors, Harold Marlowe, John Bicknell ; Society Editor, Alice Her- 
som ; Makeup Editor, Martin Legere : Pictorial Editor. David Dentan ; Ex- 
change Editor, John Dickey ; News Editors, Miller Stroup, Edith Weaver, 
Peg Swan, Albert Stubblefield, Fritz Baker ; A. W. S., Ernestine Stroup ; 
W. A. A., Louie Marie Mason. 

Society staff — Luzilla Eubank, Mildred Fritchle. Muriel McClanahan, 
Sarah Mclntyre, Caroline Morrison, Lyda Roark, Sally Tompkins, Jane 
Walker, Imogene Young. Makeup staff — Edith Gaylord. Exchange staff — 
Charles Macdonald. Sports staff — Ronald Rolph, James Ransom, Dick Al- 
son, David Waters. Proof readers — Lucy Blackman. Frances Stevenson. 
News staff — Jake Johnson, David Dentan, Gilbert Baylis, Alice Sutton, La- 
Rue Wiley, Nanet Meredith, Claire Sweany, Elvira Cortellini, Ruth Mary 
Webster. Esther Alexander, Charles Dewing, Ken Hall, Jennie Conway, 
Mark Schreiber. Marybel Poer, Ruth Liverman, Margaret Stewart, Ann 
Daniels, Conrad Brown, Dale Ashbaugh, Frank Johnson, Jean James, Doro- 
thy Elston, Helen Miller, Ellen Perry, Susan Braerton, Dick Hall, Emma 
Louise Jordan, Virginia Botsford, Roberta McKay. 



BOO 




* CONSTRUCTIVE CRITICISM 

when proposed by those who have backbone enough to stand back 
of said criticism, is welcomed by this publication. However, this office 
has little regard for worthy-minded pedantic individuals who rationalize 
their apparent lack of the true facts of the case by psuedo-Menckenistic 
ramblings taken WITHOUT REGARD TO TRUTH OR CONTENT from 
former editions of the TIGER. It is characteristic of this ilk to refrain 
from signing their name and to hang such drivel in public places under 
cover of darkness. It might also clarify the situation to observe that 
every college newspaper in the Rocky Mountain conference has with- 
stood attacks of this kind and without exception they have originated 
from lampooning individuals whose sense of self-importance has been 
snubbed by the exclusion of their brand of tripe from publication in 
the various college news organs. 

+ IN DEFENSE 

of "Time" style, might we add that we are convinced of its effective- 
ness in use for the reason of enforced make-up brevity in the COLO- 
RADO COLLEGE TIGER. The fundamental underlying the whole prin- 
ciple of this style is consciousness. If we are to cover most of the news 
in COLORADO COLLEGE we must of necessity use a shortened version 
of true newspaper style. An effort was made at the beginning of the 
year to change our makeup to that of a newspaper. In this case the con- 
ventional newspaper style is appropriate. However, until this change 
can be made, we will continue to use a magazine-style make-up and 
journalism in the COLORADO COLLEGE TIGER. In defense of "Time" 
itself, we might add that its revolutionary style of journalism is one of 
the most outstanding and acclaimed in the newspaper world today. An 
analytic contact with the magazine will do much to prove this state- 
ment. 



♦ Groundless 

insinuations that the editorial staff of the TIGER is a party to 
"coercive fraud" should be based upon fact rather than feeling. For 
the information of the man in the street may we state that the editorial 
staff of this publication is in no way connected with the business depart- 
ment. It is enlightening to note that upwards of $2000 is given many 
of the college newspapers in the conference for expense, while the 
COLORADO COLLEGE TIGER receives about one-third of this amount. 
The records of business transactions carried on by the TIGER are open 
to inspection at any time at the office of Jo E. Irish. With this we take 
leave of the entertaining but spineless Walrus and his less-talented 
friend, the Carpenter, pausing to note that any criticism brought by these 
individuals to this office will be received in a constructive way provided 
a name is attached. — The Acting Editor. 



BACK TO THE OLD COUNTRY 
The Native's Return — by Louise 
Adamic Harper ($2.75) 

The United States is alright but 
just the same there is nothing like 
getting home again, even though it 
is just for awhile. Thus thought 
Adamic, eminent naturalized Amer- 
ican author. Consequently when 
the Guggenheim Foundation of- 
fered him a year's trip to the 
homeland for the purpose of "cre- 
ative writing", Adamic snapped up 
the chance. Not only that but he 
took his wife with him, which must 
mean something. 

When Author Adamic and wife 
hit the home state, which incident- 
ally is Jugo-Slavia, they were wel- 
comed with the proverbial open 
arms. Every city into which he and 
said spouse would go pratcically 
gave him the kev to say nothing 
of the fatted calf as they literally 
did in the village of Blato which 
he calls home. 

As w a s intended upon leaving 
America, he was to remain for just 
a short time in the home state and 
then continue his travels. But va- 
rious things kept him rooted to the 
family threshold, namely; Uncle 
Yanez, who thoughtfully did not 
die until he had seen the long lost 
nephew, Cousin Tone, who thought- 
fully refrained from marriage until 
author Adamic could arrive and be 
groomsman for before-mentioned 
event, and last but not least Uncle 
Mikha, who, much as he hated to 
admit it, refrianed from not bawl- 
ing him out for not having written 
home more often. 

After spending several weeks in 
the home town Adamic started out 
to see the country which he had 
not seen for so many years. Every- 
where he went he was accorded 
the same fame and welcome. It 
was rumored in Jugo-Slavia that 
the native son had been sent to 
their country by an immensely rich 
American in order to make a re- 
port on the true affairs of their 
country. 

The natives ideas were right. 
Adamic did make a report about 
the conditions existing in their 
country. The report stated thai 
King Alexander and his govern- 
ment constituted a flat and imper- 
sonal dictatorship. That the jails 
of the country were full of politi- 
cal prisoners and if it had not been 
for the fact that he was so promi- 
nent he would never have been 
able to cross the border with the 
notes he had collected. 

Throughout the entire book 
runs a very pleasant discourse on 
the life, habits and thoughts of the 
Jugo Slavian people which is ex- 



tremely interesting. But at the 
same time there is an ominous air 
permeating the pages with the idea 
that eventually, and in the not too 
far distant future, the country will 
be war torn to the nth degree. 

WEARIN' 0' THE GREEN 
Shake Hands with the Devil — 
Rearden O'Connor 
Morrow ($2.50) 

"The Two Years" in Irish his- 
tory means the rebellion Ireland 
started against England in 1919 
and carried on, remotely successful, 
for two years. Author Conner in 
this tale woven around Kerry Sut- 
ton, a medical student in Dublin, 
swears to its authenticity, and 
judging from other experts who 
have passed upon it there seems to 
be no question. Kerry, who at the 
time was entirely impartial to either 
cause, being half Irish and the 
other half English, decided to 
spend a pleasant afternoon watch- 
ing the bombing of a Black and 
Tan lorry. But as luck would have 
it he became mixed up in the fol- 
lowing fight and killed a man in 
self defense. His only recourse was 
to join up with the Irish Republi- 

' can Army, which he did. 

The tales which Kerry tells about 

I the massacres between the two 
factions is blood-curdling to say the 

I least. It reads like the rankest 

| story ever written in "Weird 

■ Tales." As in the way of all flesh, 
Kerry fell madly in love with Lady 
Moira. a hostage, and decided 
after guarding her for awhile that 
Sherman might possibly have been 

i wrong in his condemnation of war. 

| Everything went well in this love 
affair until Ladv Moira was un- 
ceremoniously shot. Kerry imme- 
diately went what is more common- 
ly known as "hay-wire" and head- 
ed for the nearest Black and Tan 
post and told them leading infor- 
mation. In the ensuing battle Ker- 
ry had the aesthetic delight of 
watching his former pals butchered. 
His joy was short lived, however, 
because the Black and Tans then 
put Kerry on a truck loaded with a 
time bomb and thus ends the 
story, a pleasing little bed time 
tale for children who require one 
before their proverbial ten hours. 



NOTICE 
Applications for managership of 
the Junior Prom must be in the 
hands of Ruth Adams, President of 
the Junior class by Monday morn- 
ing, Feb. 12. All applicants will 
please note that the Junior class 
will not be responsible for any def- 
icit incurred by Prom managers. 









Friday, February 9, 1934 



THE TIGER 



Just another mad hatter. A Geor- 
gia Tech freshman, who snatched 
a cap from a member of the Ala- 
bama band during the Tech-Ala- 
bama game, was reprimanded by 
the Tech student council, was com- 
pelled to return the cap and write 
a letter of apology to the Alabama 
band. 

*•• -!• -»- 

Recently the Michigan Daily list- 
ed the names of 12 of the univer- 
sity's most prominent almuni. Three 
of the names on the list were those 
who because of low scholastic 
ranking, failed to complete their 

courses of study. 

••• ••• -•* 

The type of freshman entering 
De Pauw university now is some 
what advanced along all lines than 
those of a few years ago, reports the 
school's paper. Witness a typical 
conversation heard on De Pauw's 
campus. 

Senior: Wher'j" go aft' th' dans. 

Frosh: I took da babe home, den 

went out and eta. 

••• ••• ••• 

An examination at the University 
of Mississippi asked for the prin- 
ciple parts of any Latin verb. Up- 
on one paper was written: "Slip- 
peo, slippere, f alii, bumptus." The 
returned paper had these words: 
"Falio, failere, fluncto, suspen- 
dum." 



ParticularWork 

FOR PARTICULAR PERSONS 
AT NO HIGHER COST 

Smith Bros. 

CLEANERS, DYERS, HATTERS 
13-15 E. Kiowa Phones 1221-1222 



\ 



SiX Of 
AKiMD 

A Paramount Picture with 

CHARLIE RUGGLES 
MARY BOLAND 
KV. C. FIELDS 
ALISON SKIPWORTH 
GEORGE BURNS 
GRACIE ALLEN 

Directed by Leo McCarey 

RIALTO 



fOMPKINS HOMf OWNED 



K 



EYHOLE 
EEPER 



Note to the Walrus: Thanks for 
omitting the Keep, from your scath- 
ing scath of the bleat — so kind of 
you. C'm up'n see me sometime . . 
. . . Dee Glidden, standing on the 
Gamma Phi porch surrounded by 
doting females due to his recent in- 
terest in Elizabeth Richter 

some nasty mans has been stealing 
all the food from the Kappa house 
.... Marty Stelson is going to 
Boulder this term .... Marlowe and 
little Rolph, going forty miles an 
hour in Rolph's Cadillac, were fined 
ten bucks each for speeding, dis- 
turbing the peace, and reckless 
driving after the Antlers' dance 
Saturday night . . . Sigma Chi house 
mother over the phone to a Tiger 
reporter on the query of second 
semester pledges: "No, they haven't 
got anybody yet, but they're still 
trying" . . . Kappa Sigs pledged a 

boy named "Shakespeare" 

also they now have a Trainer .... 
and when are the Delta Alphs going 
to get the Lambda Chi business 
over with? Such suspense . apples, 
doughnuts and sandwiches was the 
fare at Peg Swan's 18th birthday 
partv Sunday night .... Originali- 
tor 0. O. Mclntyre has the job of 
selecting D. U's beauties this year 
for the Kvnewisbok which is their 
annual, and no matter what you do 
with the name — spell it backwards, 
hold it in front of a mirror, or sub- 
tract every other letter, it doesn't 
make sense .... Columist Oscar 
replied to D. U.'s letter bv writing 
on the original missive, "I'll do it, 
but it's a verv unpopular gesture!" 
.... poor old Bemis food is getting 
a new dietitian now .... a local 
gal named Wilfrey .... personal 
mention to the profs who keep on 
their toes listening to radio, reading 
newspapers etc., — ■ you can cer- 
tainly tell it by listening to their 
lectures .... Bemis was quite start- 
led recently when Slater walked up 
the stairs after Sande .... and he 
came down with her .... Upon 
hearing that Mike Gleason could no 
longer model at the Art Academy, 
because he had too much hair on 
his chest, Nurse Ryan suggested 
someone buy him a package of 
bobby pins .... As Maidie Roth- 
gerber goes walking for her gym 
credit, friend Carl Maynard walks 
with her — seeing them run up and 
down hills the other day was quite 
delectable . . . Snails, Their Life, 
Habits, and Progeny is Marion Mar- 
riott's latest talk subject .... also 
delectable. 



And they said Lochinvar turned cob pipes . . . The professor came 

white . . . Washington college coeds up at the count of nine and closed 

given permission to smoke saunter- all the doors and windows, shortly 

ed into class puffing away at corn- the room was empty . . . 




BREAKFAST 
for 8 o'clock martyrs 

Here's an alarm-clock for appetites that like 
to sleep late in the morning. Crisp, delicious 
Kellogg's Corn Flakes, rich in energy. 

Try them tomorrow morning with milk 
or cream. Add fruits or honey, and you'll 
actually enjoy getting up for breakfast. 

Kellogg's are a real treat at night, too — 
after a date, or a cramming session. They 
make an ideal "night-cap." So light and easy 
to digest. Kellogg's Corn Flakes encourage 
sound, restful sleep. 

Always oven-fresh and crisp. 
Made by Kellogg in Battle Creek. 




DOOu»«IT 



The most popular ready- 
to-eat cereals served in 
the tlining-rooms of 
American colleges, eating 
clubs and fraternities are 
made by Kellogg in 
Battle Creek. They in- 
clude Kellogg's All-Bran, 
PEP, Rice Krispies, and 

Kellogg's WHOLE WHEAT 

Biscuit. Also Kaffee Hag 
Coffee — real coffee — 
97% caffeine free. 




CORN 
FLAKES 

• OVEN-FRESH • 
FLAVOR-PERFECT 



i ,-i,x. i -i f-' T'.E C* 



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FOR FLAVOR 



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:KvKv:-K;«:«:v;:m;«;B::;; 



THE TIGER 



Friday, February 9, 193- 



' 



"WHEN A FELLER 
NEEDS A FRIEND" 




Placed on the market a year ago, this pipe 
mixture made many friends before it had 
a line of advertising. Aged in the wood for 
years . . . BRIGGS is mellow, packed with 
flavor, biteless! Won't you try a tin and let 
genial BRIGGS speak for itself? 




KEPT FACTORY FRESH 

by inner lining of 

CELLOPHANE 




Debate 

Today and tomorrow, Feb. 9 and 
10, the COLORADO COLLEGE 
debate squad attends the annual in- 
vitational contest sponsored each 
year by Denver University. 

The meeting this year promises 
to be one of the largest ever held 
with teams attending from Utah 
U, New Mexico U, Wyoming U, 
Nebraska U, and Hastings Col- 
lege, Nebraska, in addition to con- 
ference schools in Colorado. 

The program for the meet not 
only includes debate competition, 
but will also furnish competitions 
in extemporaneous speaking, ora- 
tory and original oration. A fea- 
lure address will be given bv Prof. 
Arthur G. Sharp, Jr., on "The Art 
of Makeup." 

Members of the te*m accom- 
panying Cooeland to Denver are 
Genev ; eve Affolter. Max Finkle- 
«tein, Kenneth Gloss, Harrison 
Loesch. Frank Jensen, Alfred 
Heinicke and manager James Ar- 
noH. 

The debate squad journeys to 
the Colorado Debate Conference 
competition at Colorado Agricul- 
t'tral co'leee Feb. 23, 24, and 25. 
The annual barnstorming trip will 
probably be made this year South 
and East as far as Alamaba and 
Mississippi. 

According to Prof. Cooeland, 
the 1 935 Colorado Debate Confer- 
ence comoetition will be spon- 
sored by COLORADO COLLEGE. 

Northwestern university students, 
750 strong, marched through the 
streets of Evanston recently flaunt- 
ing banners in vigorous protest a- 
s;ainst the proposed merger of their 
institution with the University of 
Chicago. Placards read, "John D. 
can't suoport Chicago — how can 
we?" "Northwestern merge means 
submerge," meanwhile the presi- 
dents of both universities have re- 
fused to confirm reports that the 
two schools will combine. 



A BETTER POSITION 



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Hundreds of teachers, students and college graduates will 
earn two hundred dollars or more this summer. SO CAN YOU. 
Hundreds of others will secure a better position and a larger 
salary for next year. YOU CAN BE ONE OF THEM. Com- 
plete information and helpful suggestions will be mailed on re- 
ceipt of a three cent stamp. Good positions are available now in 
every state. They will soon be filled. (Teachers address Dept. T. 
All others address Dept. S.) 

CONTINENTAL TEACHERS AGENCY, Inc. 

1850 DOWNING STREET— DENVER, COLORADO 
Covers the ENTIRE United States 



School Officials 

You may wire us 
your vacancies at 
our expense, i f 
speed is urgent. 
You will receive 
complete, free 
confidential re- 
ports by air mail 
within 36 hours. 



Junior Prom 

plans were discussed at a J - 
ior class meeting Thursday morn 5 
in Perkins hall. A date, Frid 
Mar. 16, was set for the affair a| 
indications point to a much difl 
ent and more highly entertain 
social function. 

Unlike its predecessors, the 19 
Jui.ior Prom will be free from fi 
dress implications in favor of 
semi-formal attire. A program 
being planned which includes, 1 
sides the traditional parade of Nu 
get beauty queen nominees, a 
ries of featured acts providi 
sophisticated entertainment for t 
merrymakers. 

The price for the prom this ye 
will be $1.10 a couple which is 
decided reduction from form 
years. 

Managers of the Prom, as is cu 
tomary, will be chosen by the Jul 
ior class officers. They are: Prest 
dent, Ruth Adams; Vice President, 
Budd Anderson ; Secretary, Hai '■» 
riet Engle, and Treasurer, Henr Hl 
Finger. Applications for managei " 
ship of the Prom must be handei -j 
to the President by Monday mom l 
ing, Feb. 12. | 

Those desirous of applying fol 
managerships should take cognizl ' 
ance of the fact that the clas^ 
voted not to be responsible for any 
deficit incurred by Prom managers^ 

Visitor 

Miss Helen Snyder, field secre4 
tary for KaDpa Kappa Gamma wasfH 
a visitor this week to the local 
Kappa chapter. Monday evening^! 
Miss Snyder was entertained bv the! 
Kappa alumnae association. Tue; 
day she attended a tea given in h 
honor by the active chapter, a 
on Wednesday evening was a 
honored guest at a dinner given at 
the Kappa lodge. 

During her visit. Miss Snyder 
was the house guest of Miss F.mma 
Louise Jordan, President of the 
C. C. chapter. 

Red Lantern 

clubbers at a meeting Thursday 
morning discussed plans for a 
forthcoming all-college dance to be 
given in the near future. A com- 
mittee was appointed in charge of 
the entertainment consisting of 
Jack Conley, President. Gale Mid- 
dlestetter and Lots deHolczer. 

Dances sponsored by the Red 
Lantern club have been remem- 
bered from past performances as 
being the class of student enter- 
tainment. Student followers of the 
best in campus social affairs will 
await with eagerness the announce- 
ment of te dance date. 



riday, February 9, 1934 



THE TIGER 





ot from the Hardwood 

Tonight the "Tiger Basketball- 
rs" trot on to the hardwood at 
■aramie and meet what is generally 
nown throughout the conference as 
ne of the strongest teams which 
Wyoming has ever presented as op- 
osition for a conference contender, 
f — the basketeers representing 
I Black and Gold of COLORADO 
!OLLEGE trounce off the hardwood 
/ith a win, they will have accom- 
lished one of the biggest upsets of 

he current season BEAT 

WYOMING .... Every member of 
he squad turned in a bang-up game 
n the Aggie series, and, providing 

ey drive and drive some more, 
vith lots of hard fight, methinks the 

nevitable will be the result 

SEAT WYOMING Capt. Glid- 

ien now holds second place in the 
:ading scorers column . . "Jump- 
lg" Jack Livingston with his short, 
ricky, one-handed shots had the 
\ggie guards stumped . . . BEAT 

WYOMING Little "Albie" 

Boothe smothered Campbell, Aggie 
mrward, consistently in the second 
•me of the series . . . "What a 
ran" Richard "Punk" Harter has 
proven himself to be one of the 
main cogs in the Tiger squad and . 
. . . BEAT WYOMING . . . Ryerson 
received quite an ovation from all 
true Tiger followers in his first ap- 
pearance before a home crowd this 
season . . . Patterson has a way of 
scoring points that no other mem- 
>er of the team possesses. We like 
t, though . . . BEAT WYOMING. 



eastern Division Standings: 

Wyoming U 7 1.000 

:OLO. COLLEGE .... 5 I .833 

"olo. Univ 4 2 .667 

lolo. Aggies 3 3 .500 

Western State 3 3 .500 

2olo. Teachers 3 4 .429 

)enver Univ 1 6 .143 

:olo. Mines 7 .000 



Continuing their steady and ir- 
resistable march of Victory, the 
COLORADO COLLEGE basketball 
team defeated the strong Colorado 
Aggies team on both Friday and 
Saturday evenings at the Auditor- 
ium, by the scores of 32-27 and 
27-22 ending each game with the 
same lead of five points. 

On Friday night it was nip and 
tuck affair right up to the finish 
with Campbell of the Aggies scor- 
ing seventeen points for his team, 
with a series of deadly accurate tos- 
ses. For the Tigers Glidden and 
Boothe were high men with twelve 
and eight points respectively. 

In the first half the Black and 
Gold led 18-10 when the gun went 
off, and in the following session in- 
creased their lead to 25 - 16, at 
which point the Aggies again set the 
pace with Campbell and Damke 
scoring for their team reducing the 
Tigers lead to five points when the 
game ended. 

On Saturday night another close 
struggle developed from the start of 
the game so that at the close of the 
first half the Farmers were on the 
long end of a 13-12 score. The sec- 
ond half however was COLORADO 
COLLEGE'S all the way. The Tig- 
er's defense tightened up and 
Campbell who had figured large on 
Friday was guarded so closely by 
Joe Boothe that he was held to four 
points for the evening. Glidden on 
the otherhand eclipsed his previous 
record making a total of thirteen 
tallies for the Black and Gold 
squad. 

The series was a hard fought one, 
and left the Tigers well established 
in second place with a record of 
five wins to one loss. The Aggies 
were quite the fastest organization 
that the Black and Gold have met 
so far this season and the double 
victory was one of which the Tig- 
ers may well be prpud. The series 
between COLORADO COLLEGE 
and Colorado Aggies was of partic- 
ular importance as it was the last 
series for the Tigers before they 
left for Laramie to tackle the league 
leading Cowboys. 



C. C. vs. Wyoming U. 

Tonight, the COLORADO COL- 
LEGE team will play the last year 
Championship basketball team of 
Wyoming University. The Cow- 
boys have at the present writing 
won every s^me with a percent?s?e 
of 1000. COLORADO COLLEGE 
has one defeat handed down to 
them by Western State in one of 
the big surprises of the season. En- 
thusiasm at the Tiger institution 
has leaped in bonds the past week 
and if the pep presented by the 
student body in Assembly yesterday 
morning is any evidence of the re- 
sult of the Wyoming series, the 
Tigers will be received home in 
grand style Sunday as a result of 
a sweeping series with C. C. hold- ; 
ing the long end of the score in j 
each game. 

"Bully" Van de Graaff in a short ; 
talk to the student body yesterday j 
stated that the C. C. team was one 
of the fightingest teams in the j 
country today and with that fight, 
they are determined to upset the j 
dope bucket. Juan Reid also 
talked briefly and said that the 
Tigers are like the little freshman 
who came to college with too much 
enthusiasm and as a result was all 
"wound up." "The Tigers are all 



wound up and are out to hand the 
unconquered Cowboys a surprise of 
their life." 

Every member of the Tiger 
squad is in the best of condition 
and with the bulk of the burden 
placed upon little Joe "Albie" 
Boothe and his guarding of the 
heretofore unstoppable Les Witte, 
will be a feature of the game. 
Witte has scored some sixty points 
in conference competition thus far 
and will be out to increase this 
average tonight and tomorrow 
night. In the event that the Tiger 
team splits the series with Wyo- 
ming they will have a true hold 
with Wyoming for championship 
honors. Wyoming on the other 
hand can cinch the Eastern Di- 
vision title by handing the Tigers 
two consecutive defeats. 



Undefeated 

Sigma Chi is the only unbeaten 
team in the interfraternity cage race 
as the result of the Phi Delts 11-19 
nose-out over the heretofore un- 
beaten Phi Gam team. 

D. Hall, Phi Delt forward, was 
high point man of the evening with 
a total of nine points. His accurate 
ball tossing was a feature of this 
tussle. 

In the second offering of the ev- 
ening Sigma Chi scored at will a- 
gainst the Barbs and rolled up a 41- 
1 1 score against the Independents. 



Grunts and Groans 

Colorado Teachers College gave 
the C. C. student grapplers an in- 
troductory course in "A Technique 
of Wrestling" last week and threw 
the Tigers all over the mat for a 
33-5 win over their student follow- 
ers. 

McConnell, C. C. 128 pound man 
couldn't be taught and reversed the 
cali, hence throwing Stanley in 2 
minutes and 55 seconds. This was 
the only match won by a Waite pu- 
pil. 



PATRONIZE THESE 

griefs 

ADVERTISERS 



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HANSEN'S RADIATOR SHOP 

EMERY STUDIO 

COLLEGE CLEANERS 

WAGNER FULTS STUDIO 

SMITH CLEANERS AND DYERS 

CRISSEY FOWLER LUMBER CO. 

RIALTO THEATRE 

DENTAN PRINTING CO. 

WULFF SHOE CO. 

MURRAY DRUG CO. 

PERKINS & SHEARER CLOTHING CO. 

COX BROTHERS 

LAUTERMAN JEWELRY CO. 

HUGHES CANDY SHOP 

SIGN OF THE ROSE 

FURMBILT 

THEY ARE LOYAL TO COLORADO 
COLLEGE AND THE TIGER. 






THE TIGER 



Friday, February 9, 193* 



TheFurmbiits 



Are 
Coining 



on 
FIRST VANGUARD Wheels 

SPRING SUITS 

200 STRONG 



Due To Arrive Monday 

During The Balance 

Of This Week— 

The Present Stock 

Of FURMBILT STANDARD 

SUITS AND COATS At 

$16.85 

EVER 



Extra 
Pants 
$3.15 



FURMBILT 



STORE 



20 N. 
Tejon. 



P. L. Thorsen 
Prop. 



OCIAL 






JIGG'S BARBER 
SHOP 

Haircuts 40c 

106 South Nevada 

Shampoo and Finger Wave 
50 . cents 

MARY SUTTON 
BEAUTY SHOP 

IVI. 1186 105 E. Cache la Poudre 



THE EMERY STUDIO 

Fine Portraiture 

Official Nugget Studio 

Plaza Hotel Building 



THE 

GREATEST 

SALE 

At $13.85 all light Summer Colors. 

At $16.85, The Entire line Of 

FURMBILT STANDARD. 

"We Specialize and sell For Cash" 
— No Credit Store Can Compete. 



Carrie Co-ed's Letter 

Dear Sis — 

When I arrived back Saturday 
afternoon I felt called upon to dash 
over to Cossitt and register. It 
sounds comparatively simple, but 
with my limited experience I found 
myself slightly involved with six 
nrofessors, a woman at a desk, Miss 
Fezer, Mrs Fauteaux, various help- 
ers, and the treasurer. Mostly the 
treasurer. 

You start in right at the door, 
where a grim looking individual 
shuffles cards around for a while. 
When you receive yours go to a 
certain table, and let some professor 
talk you into taking a flock of stuff 
you're not remotely interested in. 
Then you proceed to search for a 
place to sit, and write your name, 
course, family history and any other 
interesting bits about fifteen times 
each. If still able to struggle around 
after this major accomplishment, 
vou stand in lines to see people and 
fill out more blanks. After two hours 
they permit you to join the column 
at the checking table, and if lucky 
you proceed thence to the line be- 
fore the treasurer's outfit. This is 
most wearing of all. When finally 
leaching the high and mighty you 
find to your dismay that their idea 
of going to school is to plunk out 
the full amount at once. Whereup- 
on. I produced my five dollars and 
gave them a good pep talk about 
more each month. Not good enough 
though. 

I finally emerged clutching a 
promissory note, and an athletic 
licket, having signed my life away, 
and having a chill feeling around 
the ankles that no good will come 
from all this. 

And so, dear family, I am regis- 
teied, and have started my second 
semester in dear old college. I'm 
going to study hard this semester 
and raise my average. Favorite 
saying this time of the year. 

Studiously yours, 
Carrie 



urn hi mm iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii 


|i' 


ASSORTED VALENTINE 
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For Your Parties 
1 Also Heart Shaped Boxes, 
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! Hughes Candy Shop 

^ 128 North Tejon 


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Social Calendar 

| For Second Semester 
Wednesday, February 14 

Beta Theta Pi Dinner 
Friday, February 23 

Colonial Ball 
Saturday, February 24 

Univ. of Colo. vs. C. C. 

Kappa K?ppa Gamma Subscrip- 
tion Dance 

Kappa Sigma dance 
Friday, March 2 

Delta Gamma tea for Alumnae 

Phi Gamma Delta dance 

Sigma Chi dance 
Saturday, March 3 

C. S. T. C. vs C. C. 

Gamma Phi Beta dance 
Friday, March 9 

Kappa Alpha Theta dance 
Saturday, March 10 

Phi Delta Theta dance 
Friday, March 16 

Nugget All-College dance 
Friday, March 23 

Spring vacation begins 

Kappa Sigma dance 
Friday, April 6 

Skelton tea 

Delta Gamma dance 
Saturday, April 7 

Gamma Phi Beta Alumnae sub- 
scription dance 
Friday, April 13 

Phi Gamma Delta dance 

Kappa Kappa Gamma dance 
Friday, April 27 

Sigma Chi dance 
Saturday, May 12 

Gamma Phi Beta Formal 
j Saturday, May 19 

Phi Delta Theta dance 
I Friday, May 25 

Beta Theta Pi spring party 

Delta Gamma formal 
1 uesday, May 29 

Phi Gamma Delta formal 
Thursday, June 7 

Kappa Sigma- formal 

Kappa Sigma formal 

Kappa Alpha Theta formal 

Kappa Kappa Gamma spring 
party 

Sigma Chi formal 



CHAPEL CALENDAR 
Tuesday, Feb. 13; 10:00 a. m. — 

Chapel Service. 

Speaker — Mrs. Lloyd Shaw — 

Subject "Abraham Lincoln." 



\l 







Buffet Supper 

The Gamma Phi Beta alumnae 
served a buffet supper at the lodge 
on Wednesday evening in honor of 
the actives and pledges. Following 
the supper entertainment was furn- 
ished by the crystal ball gazing of 
Madame Hermina who fortold the 
futures of all the Gamma Phis. The 
climax of the evening was the pre- 
sentation of a gift of chinaware to 
the active chapter by the alumnae. 



CAMPUS CHIC 

Color! Color! Color! The camp] 
us coeds are becoming color conT 
scious. 

Sandy Walker's frolicsome blond 
curls are enhanced by a pink sport 
dress of spring-like freshness. It is 
a two piece affair with shining gold 
threads running through the lact 
designs. A nonchalant belt tie 
loosely in front. 

Peggy Simpson's Grecian beauty 
is charming in a crepe dinner dresfc 
of soft rose. The dress has long 
tight sleeves, is cut low in the back, 
?nd is accented by a wide sparkling 
belt of rhinestones. With it she 
wears smart silver sandals. 

Some people would dispute tha 
statement that black is a color, but 
no one could deny its smartness and 
appropriatness for any occasion 
appropraiteness for any occasion- 
there are many such frocks to be 
seen in any social gathering. SallW 
Tompkins wears a charming black 
velvet dinner dress, with a slit bac 
fastened with a rhinestone clip an 
with full sleeves to the elbow an 
tight cuffs. With it she wears rhin 
stone clips in her hair, and blac 
velvet slippers on her feet to com- 
plete the costume. 

Carol Hurley enriches her dark 
warm coloring with the lively crim- 
son hue of her new semi-formal. It 
ic cleverly cut, low in the back, and 
clings tightly to her litheson fig- 
ure. 

Virginia Berger always looks like 
a picture of what the well-dressed 
cc ed will wear. One of her color- 
ful sports dresses is made of lipstick 
red corduroy accented with black. 
With it she sometimes wears a saucy 
"tip-top" sailor hat that causes 
I many people to wonder how she 
j keeps it on. 

Tau, Theta, and Alpha Phi chap- 
ters of Gamma Phi Beta will be the 
hostess' to the national Gamma Phi 
Beta convention which will be held 
at the Broadmoor Hotel this sum- 
mer. 



a 



|-iday, February 9, 1934 



THE TIGER 



.i nmi i ii iiii n i ni iii i ii i ii iM iii niimnn 



Ask Roy 
about It! 

We Sell — Rent — Repair 
and Exchange 

Every Make 

I Typewriter 

AND 

Adding Machine 



^^^ 




125 N. Tejon St. 
Phone Main 95 



t:» : »»»» » t i »»»»»»::»»tt»»»») 




WE WASH 
EVERYTHING 
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THINK 

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MEANS 



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Phones M. 1085-1086 



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Send Her Flowers — 
The Appropriate 

Valentine 



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COLORADO SPRINGS, COLORADO 



FULLY ACCREDITED 
COEDUCATIONAL 
NON-SECTARIAN 



VIEW OF SHOVE CHAPEL FROM LEFT 
OF PALMER HALL ENTRANCE 



One of the six LIBERAL ARTS COLLEGES of the country 
on the Harvard Professorship Exchange. 

"A College which has the life and vigor of the West combined 
with the carefulness and standards of the East." 




VIEW OF MOUNTAINS AND CAMPUS FROM RIGHT 
OF PALMER HALL ENTRANCE 



SCHOOLS OF 

ARTS AND SCIENCES, LETTERS AND FINE ARTS 
THE NATURAL SCIENCES, THE SOCIAL SCIENCES 

A sound education at Colorado College amid beautiful and healthful surroundings pre- 
pares the graduate to secure the greatest benefits from life, not alone in technical re- 
quirements of a degree, but in society, recreation, athletics, religion and capable appre- 
ciation of everything worthwhile. 

C. B. HERSHEY, A. M., ED. D., ACTING-PRESIDENT 



10 



THE TIGER 



Friday, February 9, 19; 



lou buy Chesterfield cigarettes every day. You may 
buy them one place today and another place tomorrow 
— or you may buy them the same place every day. 

It is estimated that there are this day 769,340 places in 
this country where Chesterfields are on sale all the time. 

To make Chesterfield Cigarettes we get the 
best tobacco and the best materials that money 
can buy. 

We make them just as good as cigarettes can 
be made. 

We pack them and wrap them so that they 
reach you just as if you came by the factory door. 

You can buy Chesterfields in 769,340 places in 
the United States and in 80 foreign countries. 
"A package of Chesterfields please" 




© 1934, Liggett & Myers Tobacco Co. 



the cigarette that's MILDER 

the cigarette that tastes better 



ipOL>I>EGIb 
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ACROSS FROM MURRAY'S 



Strachan's 

SWEET SHOP 

Bijou and Nevada 



IRA C. DUGAN 

Jeweler and Optometrist 

Fine Watch and Clock Repairing 

Eyes Examined — Glasses Fitted 

— Lenses Duplicated — 



Colorado College 

TEXT BOOKS 

AND SUPPLIES 

C. C. and Fraternity 

Stationery 

Laundry Bags — $2.00 Each 

Murray Drug Co. 

Across From the Campus 



BERWIC 

ELECTRIC CO. 

Call Main 939, Rear 15 E. Bijcl 



Reward's 

CL^Barber 
B Shop 

19 East Bijou Street 






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Pack Bags 
Laundry Bags 
Hikers Supplies 

THE OUTWEST 

TENT and AWNING CO. 



M. 1261 



18 E. Kiowa 



Have your pictures taken now 

Official Photographer for 
the Nugget 

WAGNER-FULTS 

Chief Building 



Phone Main 1702-J 



9 N. Tejon St. 



To Maintain 
A Payroll in 
Colorado Springs 




COAL 

Phone Main 577 




> 





NEXT WEEK 




Issued each week during the academic year. Entered at Hi. 'usl Office at Colorado Spring! as Second-Claia Matter. 



THE TIGER 



Friday, February 16, 193< 



Forum 

When the annual Colorado De- 
bate Conference assembles in Fort 
Collins Feb. 23 for its three day ses- 
sion, debaters from every colleg- 
iate institution in the state except 
Mines will be prepared to discuss 
two of the most controversial poli- 
tical questions of the day. 

The two subjects for debate are: 
"Resolved that the Powers of the 
President of the United States 
should be Substantially Increased 
as a Settled Policy" and "Resolved 
that the County Unit System Should 
be Abolished." 

Debate Coach Copeland of COL- 
ORADO COLLEGE is taking ten 
sneakers to the conference. Besides 
the formal debates, several experi- 
mental types will be tried and an 
extempore speaking contest on the 
subiect: "The Functions of Educa- 
tion" will be held. 

The conference will convene in 
Colorado Springs next year. Coach 
Copeland has announced that on 
March 15 COLORADO COLLEGE 
will debrte here the University of 
Southern California on the subject 
of increase in presidential powers. 



Lincoln 

was portrayed as a man cut from 
the same incomparable stuff as the 
figure in the chapel window, Mich- 
ael arc Angelo. by Mrs. Dorothy 
Stott Shaw, COLORADO COL- 
LEGE graduate of the class of 
1913. in chapel Tuesday. 

He wasn't just Abraham Lincoln 
who saved the union and freed the 
slaves, he was a man of destiny, 
who lived a olain, firm, gentle and 
resident life. Born in the wilderness, 
he prepared himself for the great 
tasks of life, of which keeping our 
nation united was one. 

She stressed the fact that we herr 
too much about famous men, have 
them thrust down our throats every 
day from early childhood, such as 
the stern Lincoln who freed the 
slaves, and the truthful Washington 
who cut down a cherry tree, rather 
than the real characters of the men 
on whom we should look with ad- 
miration. 



Vocal Arts 

Included in the lengthy programs 
of the Third Annual Speech Con- 
ference in Denver last week were 
two talks by dramatist Arthur G. 
Sharp and a program of advanced 
public speaking under the chair- 
manship of college-booster William 
Copeland. 

The contributions of Professor 
Sharp to the discussions were: "Or- 
ganizing Students for Dramatic 
Work" and "Straight Make-up and 
Variations". COLORADO COL- 
LEGE students of dramatics and 
public speaking attended the con- 
ference which was held February 
9 and 10 on the University of Den- 
ver campus. 




Jc4 



itdeuw 



1 he best tobacco 

for pipes comes from 

Kentucky . . and 

m it's called "White 

Burley" 

W^E use White Burley in 
making Granger Rough 
Cut. It comes from the Blue 
Grass region of Kentucky — 
ripe, mild leaf tobacco. 

We select the kind that's 
best for pipes. Then we make 
it into Granger by Wellman's 
Method — and cut it up into 
big shaggy flakes. 

White Burley tobacco — 
made the way old man Well- 
man taught us how to make 
it — that's Granger. 

"Cut rough to smoke cool" 
is the way pipe smokers 
describe Granger — try it 




© 1934, Liggett & Myers Tobacco C». 



ranger Rough Cut 



the pipe tobacco that's MILD 
the pipe tobacco that's COOL 

—.folks seem to like it 



Quality "Master'Tleaners j HANSEN'S 

RADIATOR REPAIR 



Only one Quality and the 
Price is uniform 

M.in 1-8-1-1 10 E. Kiowa 

H. A. Thompson 



HE. Kiowa 



PHOTOGRAPHS 

The Gift that only you can give 
Official Photographer, C. C. Nugget 

Main 319 PAYTON STUDIO 

30 S. Tejon Phone M. 477-J 



VOLUME XXXVI 



THE TIGER 



COLORADO COLLEGE WEEKLY NEWS-MAGAZINE 



Number 20 



♦ e a m p ii 



Socialites Only 

has been the tag at previous 
Junior Proms but newly appointed 
Prom managers Budd Anderson and 
Ben Carson plan for this year The 
Prom Different — inexpensive, in- 
formal, democratic, but still retain- 
ing the old Prom color — beauty 
queen parade, smooth music, prizes, 
novelty numbers, special attrac- 
tions. 




BEN CARSON 

"Only $1.10 ..." 
Manager Carson also comes from 
South Denver, is a member of Beta 
Theta Pi fraternity, is the manager 
of this year's Nugget, and is infam- 
ous for his portrayal of Mae West 
in the last Pan Pan. 



Plans 

are being perfected for the C 
Club All-College Dance, which will 
be given soon, although the date 
has not yet been definitely set. 

The organization is taking on 
new life under the Presidency of 
Carl Carlson, as evidenced by the 
Smoker which was given last Fri- 
day night, and plans for an initia- 
tion to be held near the end of the 
basketball season, the first in two 
years. The Smoker held at Cossitt 
Hall was given in honor of many 
alumni and friends of the College. 
The program consisted of wrestling 
matches between the Varsity and 
Y.M.C.A. teams. The refreshments, 
beer and pretzels, carried many of 
the spectators back to the "Good 
Old Days", it is rumored. 



Prospective Students 

names, if turned in to Prof. H. 
E. Mathias will be contacted per- 
sonally or by mail under the new 
system of acquainting future COL- 
ORADO COLLEGE students with 
the institution. 




BUDD ANDERSON 

Gasoline Magnate . . . 

Manager Anderson received his 
weparalory education at East Den- 
lr, is a member of Phi Delta Theta 
fraternity, majors in business. 

The Prom will be held at the 
Broadmoor Hotel March 16, with 
a price innovation of $1.10 per cou- 
ple. Johnny Metzler's orchestra will 
furnish music for the event. An- 
nouncement will be made later as 
to plans for the election of the 
beauty queens. 



Art Center 

Starting actual construction in 
May, the now fully planned new 
Broadmoor Art Academy, donored 
by Mrs. F. M. P. Taylor of Colo- 
rado Springs, will probably be 
ready for occupancy by Oct., 1935. 

One of Colorado Springs' finest 
buildings when completed, the new 
Academy will extend from the pres- 
ent site to Cascade avenue and 
nearly to Cache la Poudre street, 
while Dale street will be extended 
through Monument Park to Mesa 
Road. 

Modem in design and construc- 
tion of steel and concrete, the new 
Academy will house Koshare, Colo- 
rado Springs Drama League, and 
the Music club — all benefitting 
from the theater, costume rooms, 
music rooms, galleries, and foyer. 

A large tearoom, library, Indian 
museum housing Mrs. Taylor's col- 
lections, studios, classrooms, two 
galleries, and a logia overlooking 
the park are all included in the 
plans. During construction, art 
classes will be held in temporary 
studios to be built in the garden. 
Nationally known artists will be in- 
structors. 




HENRY E. MATHIAS 

New C. C. mail man . . . 

According to Mathias, coopera- 
tion in this matter has been encour- 
aging, but there are still hundreds 
of names which should be turned 
over to his office. He feels that each 
student in COLORADO COLLEGE 
should feel obligated to file from 
two to five names of prospects. If 
this is done immediately, contacts 
will be made in the ensuing trips to 
be made shortly to all parts of the 
-state. 



1 Notice 

All regularly enrolled students of 
COLORADO COLLEGE who are in- 
terested in the formation of a Fly- 
ing Club are requested to see Mr. 
Richard C. Ragle at Cutler Hall 
(lower southeast laboratory) be- 
tween the hours of 2 and 3 o'clock 
P. M., Tuesday, Wednesday or 
Thursday of next week. 

— Acting President Hershey 



Optics 

Alumnus Brooks A. Brice deliver- 
ed a paper entitled "A Photoelectric 
Calorimeter and Its Application to 
Grading Rosin" at the meeting of 
the Optical Society of America 
which was held last week at Colum- 
bia University. 

Dr. Brice, after doing graduate 
work at New York University, went 
to the Food and Drug Administra- 
tion of the Department of Agricul- 
ture where he has been employed 
for the last three years. 



Before the Crescent 

The faculty lecture series will be 
continued next Tuesday by Who's 
Who Professor Henry B. Dewing 
who will describe some notable per- 
sonages of the Constantinople of 
Justinian under the title: "Byzan- I 
tine Portraits". 

Dr. Dewing is visiting professor 
of ancient and modern languages 
at COLORADO COLLEGE. As us- 
ual, the lecture will begin at 8 o'- 
clock in the Pit, Palmer hall. 



Koshare's 

Director Arthur G. Sharp, Jr., 
gave two lectures Friday and Sat- 
urday before the Denver Univer- 
sity Invitational Debat Conference 
held in D. U.'s Mayo theater. 

Speaking on "The Art of Make- 
up" and "Organization of College 
Dramatics", Director Sharp also 
had conferences with Rocky Moun- 
tain Conference dramatic directors 
in regard to college theatricals. 



Announcement 

has been made of the appoint- 
ment of Harold Robinson '33, as 
assistant assayer for an Alma, Col- 
osado mining company. Robinson 
was a major in chemistry while at 
COLORADO COLLEGE. 



CWA Funds 

According to Acting President C. 

B. Hershey, COLORADO COL- 
LEGE is planning to participate in 
the provision that is being made by 
the Federal Government for part 
time jobs for college students. The 
details of the participation have 
not been completed. 

Professor Hershey further stated 
that the types of work for which 
the funds thus allotted may be 
used cover the range of jobs cus- 
tomarily done in the institutions by 
students who are working their 
way through college, including 
clerical, laboratory, research and 
work on buildings and grounds and 
in dormitories and dining halls. 

Under the provisions of the Fed- 
eral Government, COLORADO 
COLLEGE will be able to provide 
work for about 30 men and be- 
tween 20 and 25 women. In order 
to be eligible for this Federal aid, 
"the student's financial status shall 
be such as to make impossible her 
attendance at college without this 
aid". 

In anticipation of the aid which 
is now available from the Federal 
Government, the College has al- 
ready made a study of campus and 
college needs which can be sup- 
plied in large part by the labor of 
students. Further development of 
the several kinds of work to be un- 
dertaken will be determined as the 
work of the students progresses. 

The extension of the activities 
cf the Federal Government into 
the field of higher education in the 
form of part time jobs for students 
is the result, in large part, of me- 
morials sent to the Government by 
the Association of American Col- 
leges and other similar institutions 
in their annual meetings in St. 
Louis, January 15 to 19. Mr. E. 

C. van Diest, of the Board of Trus- 
tees of the College, also conferred 
personally with Mr. Harry L. Hop- 
kins, Federal Administrator of the 
Federal Emergency Relief Associa- 
tion, on this matter. These repre- 
presentations of the situation by 
Mr. van Diest and the national 
associations and others have re- 
sulted in this provision for part 
time jobs for colleje students. 

The detailed administration of 
the work of students under this 
provision in COLORADO COL- 
LEGE will be in charge of Dean 
William V. Lovitt for the men and 
Dean Louise W. Fauteaux for the 
women. 



THE TIGER 



Friday, February 16, 1934 



THE TIGER 




Editor LEW CROSBY 

Business Manager E. F. STAPLETON 

EDITORIAL STAFF 

Editors: Managing Editor. Bob Johnson; Campus Editor, Joseph Lowe; 
Sports Editors, Harold Marlowe, John Bicknell ; Society Editor. Alice Her- 
som ; Makeup Editor, Martin Legere ; Pictorial Editor, David Dentan ; Ex- 
change Editor, John Dickey ; News Editors. Miller Stroup. Edith Weaver, 
Peg Swan, Albert Stubblefield, Fritz Baker ; A. W. S., Ernestine Stroup ; 
W. A. A., Louie Marie Mason. 

Society staff — Luzilla Eubank, Mildred Fritchle, Muriel McClanahan, 
Sarah Mclntyre, Caroline Morrison, Lyda Roark, Sally Tompkins, Jane 
Walker, Imogene Young. Makeup staff— Edith Gaylord. Exchange staff — 
Charles Macdonald. Sports staff — Ronald Rolph, James Ransom, Dick Al- 
son, David Waters. Proof readers — Lucy Blackman, Frances Stevenson. 
News staff — Jake Johnson, David Dentan, Gilbert Baylis, Alice Sutton, La- 
Rue Wiley. Nanet Meredith, Claire Sweany, Elvira Cortellini, Ruth Mary 
Webster. Esther Alexander, Charles Dewing, Ken Hall, Jennie Conway, 
Mark Schreiber. Marybel . Poer, Ruth Liverman, Margaret Stewart, Ann 
Daniels. Conrad Brown. Dale Ashbaugh, Frank Johnson, Jean James, Doro- 
thy Elston, Helen Miller, Ellen Perry, Susan Braerton, Dick Hall, Emma 
Louise Jordan, Virginia Botsford, Roberta McKay. 

MANAGER'S STAFF 
Tom Patterson — Assistant Business Manager. Staff: Dave Waters, Ken 
Markel. Dave Baker. Otis Elliot. A. J. Cronk. Circulation Manager — Bob 
Kelley. 



♦ Criticism 

Asked by this office has at last been received and will be outlined 
for the benefit of the student body as timely and constructive. Might we 
observe that the reforms advocated are in line with changes which this 
office has wished for since the days when our connection with the COLO- 
ORADO COLLEGE TIGER consisted of an occasional squib entitled 
Thoughts," which made its appearance as often as a lenient editor need- 
ed filler. Strange as it may seem, these reforms, through .force of cir- 
cumstance, cannot be evolved by the editor alone. Public opinion ma- 
trializing through letters to or conferences with this office is the biggest 
single force which may mean success for the seemingly impossible. 

The reforms outlined are as follows: 

1. The change of the TIGER to the conventional newspaper form, 
proceeding from the realization that it is only by this method that a 
truly personal contact can be made between this publication and the 
student body which it serves. 

2. The reorganization of the salaries paid the editor and manager 
to allow for payment of lesser editors and advertisinm salesmen. 

3. The establishment of a "merit system" by which under-editors 
and salesmen are appointed. 

Each of these arguments are augmented by minor changes, which 
will be affected automatically as the major reforms are placed in effect. 
Your suggestions pro or con are the criterion of your interest in the 
future of your Publication. 



+ March 16 

should mark a new era in entertainment offered as an all-college 
activity with the advent of new and bigger plans for the annual COLO- 
RADO COLLEGE Junior Prom. The managers, Ben Carson and Budd 
Anderson, have assured the TIGER that the student body will be given 
its money's worth. This space is not given to advertisement of such 
functions, but after the fiascos of the past few years, WE ARE EN- 
TITLED TO OUR MONEY'S WORTH. The fact that the price of duc- 
ats has been reduced to $1.10 speaks well for the initial step in the right 
direction taken by the Prom managers. For the first time in years, cost- 
ly (?) favors are abolished. For the first time in years we will have a 
chance to enjoy ourselves in a school activity without emphasis upon 
the financial returns. For the first time in years — we think we'll go. 



NOTICE 
Hereafter assignments to the 
news staff of THE TIGER will be 
posted on the bulletin boards in 
Palmer hall on Monday morning. 
The stories should then be in the 
TIGER boxes as soon as possible. 

Students are urged to get their 
pictures taken for the Nugget im- 
mediately. The tentative date by 
which all solios must be in is March 
1st. Pictures may be taken at the 
Emery Studio, 17 E. Cache La Pou- 
dre, Wagner Fults Studio in the 
Burns Building or the Payton Studio 
at 30 S. Tejon St 

Prizes of $5 each are offered to 
the fraternity and sorority who get 
the highest percentage of pictures 
turned in. 

»•• ••• ••• 

AU Growlers are requested to 
wear their jackets to the Mines 
game to-night. Seats will be reserv- 
ed 

"Tho Unromantic, 

banking is a business that is a 
source of much satisfaction", ac- 
cording to Armin Barney, COLO- 
RADO COLLEGE alumnus, who 
spoke Tuesday on "Recent Bank- 
ing Problems" before Alpha Kap- 
pa Psi business fraternity in Cos- 
sitt commons. 

Mr. Barney, connected with 
Colorado Springs National Bank, 
also explained the fundamental 
soundness of banking principles 
and illustrated this by the fact that 
in 1920 there were 30,000 banks 
in the country and in 1933, 13,000. 

Dewing 

Henry Bronson Dewing, since 
1932 professor of ancient and mod- 
ern languages at COLORADO 
COLLEGE, college trained at the 
University of California( Yale Ph. 
D., Bowdoin honorary L. H. D., 
former teacher at Yale, Princeton, 
University of Texas, Bowdoin; 
dean of Robert college, Constanti- 
nople, from 1910 to 1916, and in 
1927 president of Athens college, 
Athens, lectures Tuesday evening 
in the Pit, Palmer hall, at 8 
o'clock. 



Student Jobs 

for board, room or cash can be 
very readily used at this time by 
deserving COLORADO COLLEGE 
students according to student mana- 
ger of employment, Carl Carlson. 

Carlson emphasized the fact that 
although the student office has 
made a survey of available employ- 
ment, COLORADO COLLEGE stu- 
dents can help by making contacts 
which have not been solicited. Any 
employment which will mean a 
chance for one of your classmates 
to help himself through school 
should be turned in to Carl Carlson 
at the Administration building or at 
the Sigma Chi house. 



Pikes Peak Submerged 

Pikes Peak, lofty promontary tho 
it be today, has at various times in 
its some-odd-million years of exis- 
tence been submerged by oceanic 
waters and covered by ice sheets, 
the 250 listeners at the pit in Pal- 
mer hall were told Tuesday night 
by Professor Henry E. Mathias, 
head of the Geology department of 
COLORADO COLLEGE when he 
related the history of this region in 
Geologic time. The subject of his 
address concerned "The Past and 
Present Geology of the Pikes Peak 
Region." 

Where the lofty Rocky Mountains 
now stand was at one time a huge 
trough that opened into the Arctic 
ocean and at times into the Pacific 
ocean and again into the Gulf of 
Mexico. 

By the use of slides he illustrat- 
ed that this region has been sub- 
merged by the ocean many times, 
often to the depth of 10,000 to 12, 
000 feet which accounts for the dif- 
ferent deposits made during 1 I or 
12 geologic periods. 

T.he climate of this region has 
varied during the life of Pikes Peak 
along with the different contour 
variations. This change has been 
from one extreme, sub-zero, to the 
other, sub-tropical, and at times this 
land of luxurious vegetation was a 
huge swamp, which accounts for the 
valuable deposits of coal. Since 
1873, 1 1,000,000 tons of coal have 
been mined from El Paso county 
alone. 

In relation to other mountain 
ranges on the North American con- 
tinent, the Rocky Mountains are 
relatively young. Professor Mathias 
pointed proof of an existing vol- 
cano, of years gone by, in the Crip- 
ple Creek region, and a lake at 
Florissant during recent geologic 
times. This lake has yielded many 
fine fossils of bees, mosquitoes, 
flies, butterflies, fish and leaves. 

Those large U-shaped vallies tha 
may still be seen on the slopes of 
Pikes Peak were left by a huge gla 
cier which covered the northern 
half of the North American conti- 
nent. 

Professor Mathias' address Tues- 
day night was one of a series of lec- 
tures presented to the public under 
the sponsorship of COLORADO 
COLLEGE. 



1: 

•': 
ill 






Contacting 

high school students in Lamar 
and La Junta, William Copeland, 
high school visitor, also spoke be- 
fore the Lamar Rotary Club, in re- 
cent visits to the southern part of 
the state. 

Next week the campaign will be 
carried into the north, Mr. Copeland 
speaking before the Rotary club of 
Eaton on Thursday, and before the 
similar group at Fort Collins on Fri- 
day. 



Friday, February 16, 1934 



THE TIGER 



KEYHOLE I 
EEPER 

.*. ♦.♦ 

Colorado Springs' three day win- 
ter sports season has apparently 
come and gone (easy come, easy 
go). For the first time all winter it 
has been possible to play in the 
snow without going twenty miles up 
in the mountains, and many were 
ihe jovial bobsled parties riding 
birched on behind cars — it really 
gives quite a thrill skidding around 
corners and trying to keep on an 
even keel at twenty-five miles an 

hour. 

••• ... ... 

One large fraternity group went 
up on the old stage road after meet- 
ing Monday night to sled — such is 
the efficiency of the local street 
cleaning works that all the near by 
possibilities such as Garden of the 
Gods had already been swept clear 
of snow. Black stalky pines, sheer 
expanses of moonlit snow appar- 
ently held a vertically, a billion 
sparkling stars, rumpling fresh 
snow underfoot — all quite swell. 



Tearing around slush rutted 
streets Monday afternoon in an an- 
cient and topless phaeton of some 
sort, five fraternity brothers and one 
of the brothers' gals had the time of 
their winter lives engaging in rapid- 
ly moving snowball fights with rival 
groups. Icy spheres hurtling through 
the air at bullet speed revived one 
of childhood's greatest thrills now 

almost forgotten. 

■•■ ... ... 

Thoughts while strolling: Georgia 
Pickett and Assistant French Pro- 
fessoress Dorothy Graves look alike 
.... one word description of Harry 
Fontius: slickish .... Pinkie Rol- 
lins' emerald hued sweater . . . Lina 
Mae Smith and Nadine Didrickson, 
new this semester from Montrose, 
Colorado., have three weekends 
dedicated solely to Bemis hall as 
| they were out till 1:30 Saturday 
knight and were neither to the 
Broadmoor or the Antlers . . . Prof. 
Boucher, genial little Physics man, 
has joined the bicycle riders corps 
.... Norman Gallaher reminds his 
Sig Chi brethren of a sort of com- 
bination Ghandi and Micky Mouse 



. . . . Valentine's Day saw fraternity 
houses and Bemis well cluttered 
with twelve for-a-nickel comic val- 
entines apparently all sent out by 
the same individual. Most of them 
were rather apt in panning the vic- 
tims — typical examples: Hap 
Packard was "The Janitor"; Lots 
deHolczer, "Punster"; Jimmy Ran- 
som, "Beautiful but Dumb"; Mack 
Reid totaled four; Johnny Bicknell, 
"The Farmer"; Hal Daniel Boone 
Roach, "The Football Player with 
Glue Between his Feet and the 
Feld" . rumors that Bill Agee, with 
donations from his father's drug 
store, sent the so-clever ditties . . . 
. Betty Anderson, member of Delta 
Gamma beef, fractured her ankle 
Friday and Doc Williams diagnosed 
it merely as a bruise, and a bruise 
it was until Monday when the frac- 
ture was discovered .... the bas- 
ketball team's week-end invasion of 
Laramie (Wyoming) brought along 
with it a veritable flood of telegrams 
of one sort or another. Genuine 
was Dorothy Weaver's to Ken Hall 
which was signed "Mrs. Joe Elk" in 
response to a postcard Hall had sent 
signed "Joe Elk". Fake was Jim Ri- 
ley's from the mysterious "Marcel- 
la" which said: "Too bad about 
last night's game, Jim dear, hope 
you have better luck tonight. See 
you Sunday. Marcella" — team 
brethren had composed the message 
themselves and bribed a bellboy . . 
. . Pat Patterson tried to sell (via 
telephone) Wyoming Pi Phis the 
Chick Sale star and crescent Spec- 
ialty 



Flying Cupids, 

read hearts of all sizes, and 
comic Valentines for everyone 
added to the annual Beta Theta Pi 
sweetheart banquet which was held 
on St. Valentine's Day, at Stratton 
Park Inn. The chaperons of the 
party were Prof, and Mrs. Carrol! 
Malone and Mr. and Mrs. Ronald 
Rolph. 4f 



And then this leaked out : A Wis- 
consin professor believes it would 
be a good idea to allow children to 
learn something of the "rottenness 
of government." Why disillusion 
them? 



: %, 



NORFORDS 2ss. u «.T,i. nS . 

Have Just Unpacked 100 New 

ALL WOOL SPRING SKIRTS 



This Special Purchase consists of 

Tweeds, Wool Crepes, Flannels. 

All New Colors. Sizes 26 to 32 

Regular $2.50 Values 



$1 .98 



1 



V 



J 







What do College Leaders 

have in (^ommon? 

AN OUTSTANDING characteristic of the men 
who lead in the classroom, on the campus, 
and in the social life of school is their vitality. 
They have the abundant energy that comes 
with good health. 

Your health and well-being can be slowed 
down by common constipation. Yet this 
prevalent ailment can be corrected usually 
by eating a delicious cereal. 

Two tablespoonfuls daily of Kellogg's ALL- 
BRAN will help promote regular habits. 
ALL-BRAN furnishes "bulk," vitamin B and 
iron. In the red-and-green package. Made by 
Kellogg in Battle Creek. 

The most popular ready-to-eat 
cereals served in the dining-rooms 
of American colleges, eating-clubs 
and fraternities are made by Kellogg 
in Battle Creek. They include Kel- 
logg's Corn Flakes, PEP, Rice 
Krispies, Wheat Krumbles, and 
Kellogg's whole wheat Biscuit. Also 
Kaffee Hag Coffee — real coffee 
— 97% caffeine free. 

Keep on the sunny side of life 




THE 

CRISSEY & FOWLER 

LUMBER CO. 

Phone Main 101 
117-129 W. Vermijo 



Have your pictures taken now 

Official Photographer for 
the Nugget 

WAGNER-FULTS 

Chief Building 



THE TIGER 



Friday, February 16, 193- 



PORT 




TIGER ROARS 

Dear Walrus: 

Your enthusiasm most obviously 
manifested during the past few- 
weeks regarding the policy of the 
Tiger has led me to pause in my 
deliberations and consult you — 
merely because your constructive 
criticism may in this case save the 
reputation of a bewildered sports 
writer. 

Now, Mr. Walrus — just what 
could I do to improve the sports 
section of the COLORADO COL- 
LEGE News Magazine? As a result 
of a host of "Why don't you do 
this" and "Why don't you do 
that's", I will attempt to pull a 
Brisbane and cite a few of the sug- 
gestions with which I am helped. 

"Confine your editorials to the 
campus and conference circles." I 
once wrote an article during foot- 
ball season terming the Bengal elev- 
en as the "Lucky Tigers" and al- 
most got a black eye for it, not for- 
getting the ride I was promised if 
it occurred again. Nice fellows! 
"Criticize the coaches when the 
team loses. C. C. has as good ma- 
terial as any school." Criticize them 
yourself, I am only a Junior welter- 
weight. 

"Moan more about the players. 
Don't be afraid of making yourself 
unpopular." Yeah. ?nd me already 
with B. 0. and halitosis. From a 
faculty member, "You could really 
make this column something to be 
nroud of if you would only take the 
time." Sure — I have a couole of 
ideas for a swell novel if I'd only 
take the time. 

From a girl friend. "Why don't 
you write longer stuff? I could read 
a paee of such drivel." Lady — it 
is all I can do to pound out a col- 
umn of this droll. , 

From a fraternity brother, "Why 
don't you write about the athletic 
ability of our faculty members?" 
Sure, but not being an artist, it is 
impossible for me to draw pictures 
of red apples, labeling them "You 
know what this means". Hence the 
the life of a columnist is not all the 
life of Riley nor is it a bed of roses, 
but merely a collection of brick 
bats, accusations, promises of a 
"nice cold ride" and etcetera. 

Come on. Walrus, ol' boy, your 
brother's suggestion is hopeless. 

So you see. Walrus, ol top, that 
suggestions will be thankfully and 
courteously received and promptly 
and quietly discarded. 

Walrously yours, 
The Sports Editor 







^ 




1 









HAROLD BERG 

South Denver hash 

Harold is playing his sixth con- 
secutive year of basketball having 
lettered at South Denver during 
his high school days. While at C. 
C, Berg has been steadily improv- 
ing and is one of the most valu- 
able men on the Tiger squad. He 
is a member of Sigma Chi frater- 
nity. 



Gained Revenge 

Revenge was sweet Friday night 
as the COLORADO COLLEGE 
grapplers threw the Y.M.C.A. wrest- 
lers for a 30-1 loss. The Tiger boys 
were full of "what it takes" to 
throw their opponents and lost but 
two matches. This is the second 
time that the two teams have met 
this season, the Y.M.C.A. winning 
some time ago. There were no de- 
cisions with C. C. winning six out 
of eight matches. 

Tiger men winning matches 
were: McConnell 126 lb. class, 
Miles, 135 lb. class, Arnold 155 lb. 
class, Johnson 165 lb. class and 
Haines 1 75 lb. class. 



Beta Theta Pi— 30 
Delta Alpha Phi 

The Betas proved themselves just 
thirty points better than the Delta 
Alphs just couldn't find the basket 
night as the result of an intramural 
game played at Cossitt. The Delta 
Alps just couldn't find the basket 
and went the entire go without 
once connecting. Mike Gleason 
(Hairy Hope of Castle Rock) 
gathered in fourteen points for the 
Betas and played a hangup game. 

In the second game on the eve- 
ning's offering, the Kappa Sigma 
boys turned the tables on the 
crack Phi Delt squad and defeated 
them by a score of 14-11. The sec- 
ond round of the interfraternity 
schedule will be completed next 
week when three games will be 
played. The winner of the first 
round will play the winner of the 
second for the championship short- 
ly after the completion o f the 
scheduled games. 




From the 
Diamond Horse -Shoe 
of the Metropolitan Opera House 
Saturday at 1:45 P. M., Eastern Standard 
Time, over the Red and Blue Networks of 
NBC, LUCKY STRIKE will broadcast 
the Metropolitan Opera Company of New 
York in the complete Opera, "Faust." 



Always the Finest Tobacco 



XT 



Copyright, 1934, Tbo American Tobacco Company, 



tz: 



'riday, February 16, 1934 



THE TIGER 



; 



/£/^/" OF FINE 



TURKISH TOBACCOS 



. . . one reason 
icny Luckies taste 
I better, smoother 




In Turkey too, only the finest 
tobaccos are selected for Lucky 
Strike — the mildest leaves, the 
most delicate, the most aromatic. 
Lucky Strike is the world's largest 
user of fine Turkish tobaccos. 
Then these tender, delicate Turk- 
ish leaves are blended with choice 
tobaccos from our own Southland 
— to make your Lucky Strike a 
cigarette that is fully packed — so 
round, so firm — free from loose 
ends.That's why Luckies taste bet- 
ter, smoother. "It's toasted" — for 
throat protection — for finer taste. 



v the Center Leaves v~ 




NOT the top leaves — they're under-developed 
— they are harshl 

The Cream of the Crop ^ 



"The tenderest, mildest, 

smoothest tobacco' 







NOT the bottom leaves — they're inferior in 
quality— coarse and always sandy ! 



Tigers Come Close 

COLORADO COLLEGE traveled 
to Laramie last week-end to play 
the champion Cowboy five of Wyo- 
ming. T,he first game on Friday 
night proved to be a nip and tuck 
affair and although the Tigers were 
never once in the lead, they manag- 
ed to keep right on the tails of 
"Dutch" Witte's boys throughout 
the game, the final score being 37- 
32. 

Les Witte remained invincible, 
no one being able to stop him. Dur- 
ing the game he gathered 1 7 points, 
six field goals and five free throws. 

The game was the most thrilling 
one that .has been played on the 
Wyoming "half acre" court in a 
long time. Although the Tigers 
threatened again and again? Wyo- 
ming had the punch to pull them- 
selves up in front once astain. 
"Tiny" Dee Glidden proved him- 
self the .hero for the Bengal five 
with five field goals and four free 
throws. 

In the second of the series the 
game started off with a bang, the 
two teams playing on even terms 
for the first ten minutes. However, 
with the score tied 6-6, Les Witte 
started shooting and didn't stop un- 
til balf time with the score 14-6. 

The Tigers came back in the sec- 
ond half with a vengeance. How- 
ever, try as they might, the Ben- 
gals could not get close again. 
^ Captain Glidden of COLORADO 
COLLEGE was high point man for 
the Tigers with ten points. How- 
ever, though he, with his teammate 
Boothe, played a brilliant game, 
they were offset by the spectacular 
playing of left handed Les Witte of 
Wyoming, who secured 1 7 points of 
the 28 points made by the entire 
team. 

Though the Bengals lost both 
games they threw many a scare into 
the champions who are now sure of 
first place in the eastern division. 
The Tigers, realizing their hopes of 
first place have vanished, are striv- 
ing for second position in the stand- 
ings. 



THE TIGER 



Friday, February 16, 1934 



"WHEN A FELLER 
NEEDS A FRIEND" 




When you're handed the raspberry be- r^ ^) 
fore your honey . . . puff away your,— ^C 
grouch with genial BRIGGS. Its sa- 
vory prime tobaccos are tempered and 
seasoned for years in the wood, 'til 
they're mellow and mild and minus 
all bite . . . The truly biteless blend 
. . . the friend a feller needs. 



KEPT FACTORY FRESH 

by inner lining of 

CELLOPHANE 




O P. Lorillard Co., Inc. 



Sixteen Sophomore Girls 

dressed in colonial costumes will 
toe to the graceful minuet in Bemis 
Commons Friday, February 23. The 
decorations this year will be espec- 
ially appropriate under the direc- 
tion of Joanna Jolly. The setting is 
to represent the garden similar to 
the one at Mount Vernon. The 
dance will continue from 8:00 un- 
til 11:00 P.M. with piano music 
being played by Mrs. Clemens. 

The boys may watech from Be- 
mis porch — if — the curtains are 
not drawn. 



States is by far the best of any ol 
the countries mentioned in regarc 
to conditions of workers as i 
whole. Our capitalistic system o; 
profit-motivation is sound and, ir 
comparison, is highly successful." 
Williams lectured to an enthusi- 
astic audiences which included 
members from the faculty and stu- 
dent body of COLORADO COL 
LEGE. 




Entertaining 

was the talk given by Whiting 
Williams Saturday evening, Feb. 
10, at the home of Mr. and Mrs. 
A. H. Jordan, parents of Emma 
Louise Jordan, COLORADO COL- 
LEGE '35. 

Speaker Williams, also proficient 
as a writer and industrial consul- 
tant, compared the personalities 
and methods of Mussolini, Hitler, 
Stalin and Roosevelt. His contact 
with the different industrial struc- 
tures has been founded upon per- 
sonal contact with the worker, 
rather than that of a tourist or 
representative of the press. 

On Mussolini: "So f?r as the 
mass citizen is concerned the Mus- 
solini regime is not successful as is 
popularly assumed. . . . The big 
question is 'What will happen 
when Mussolini passes?'' Hitler: 
"A discipe of otpimism whose pow- 
er lies in the case-history back- 
ground of Germany rather than in 
the force of Hitler as an individu- 
al. Any program in which armed 
force and torture are included as 
enforcement cannot be said to be 
based upon a solid foundation." 
Stalin: "The answer to Russia's 
success in regard to economic sta- 
bility is seen by (1) The statement 
that 5,000,000 Russians starved 
between the harvest seasons of 
1932 and 1933, (2) The rapid de- 
cline of the ruble, and (3) There 
is no motivation for the Russian 
worker." Roosevelt: "The United 



Founder's Day 

of Kappa Alpha Theta was cele 
brated by the Boulder, Coloradc 
Aggies, and COLORADO COL 
LEGE chapters on Friday evening 
Feb. 9, at the Brown Palace Hote; 
in Denver. Toasts were given anc 
Theta songs were sung during th 
dinner. There were also a numbei 
of entertaining dances given by 
professional dancers between cours- 
es. Another interesting feature of \ 
the program was the presentation 
by Harry James, director of the Ho- 
tel orchestra of a song written in 
honor of the founding of Kappa Al- 
pha Theta. 

Following the dinner, dancing 
was enjoyed by the Thetas in the 
Casanova ballroom. 



A BETTER POSITION 



Euterpe 

On Tuesday evening Euterpe was 

l entertained at a Valentine meeting 

1 at the home of Mrs. D. W. Crabb. 

| After the business meeting a most 

pleasing program was rendered. 

Mr. H. C. Thorpe, a musica 
teacher from New York City, gave 
an interesting talk on "The Musical 
Creation in America". He suggested 
that Euterpe have for one of its 
aims musical composition and in- 
clude on its programs origina 
themes. Mr. Thorpe brought out the 
•dea that art is an expression of 
emotion and creative composition 
can come only from customs and 
surroundings which the compose 
knows. 

After refreshments, which carrie 
out the Valentine scheme. Jack 
Kintz and Master David Crabb did 
a number of mysterious tricks to 
the amusement of some thirty 
guests. 



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earn two hundred dollars or more this summer. SO CAN YOU. 
Hundreds of others will secure a better position and a larger 
salary for next year. YOU CAN BE ONE OF THEM. Com- 
plete information and helpful suggestions will be mailed on re- 
ceipt of a three cent stamp. Good positions are available now in 
every state. They will soon be filled. (Teachers address Dept. T. 
All others address Dept. S.) 

CONTINENTAL TEACHERS AGENCY, Inc 

1850 DOWNING STREET— DENVER, COLORADO 

Covers the ENTIRE United States 



School Officials 

You may wire us 
your vacancies at 
our expense, i f 
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You will receive 
complete, free 
confidential re- 
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o! 



Enrollment 

for the second semester is 92.5 
per-cent of the preceeding period 
according to a statement issued by 
the president's office. Since this fig- 
ure was determined but a few days 
after registration, the actual num- 
ber of students is expected to be al- 
most normal when final results are 
computed. 

In the past the decrease in en- 
rollment has approximated 1 1 per- 
cent; so that the present decrease 
of 7.5 per-cent is very encourage- 
ing. 



I 



Friday, February 16, 1934 



THE TIGER 



Catharine Cornell 

The forbidding house at 50 Wim- 
jjole street, London, was occupied, 
during the middle years of the nine- 
ieenth century, by timid Elizabeth 
Barrett (Katharine Cornell) and 
(ier father, a strict and unbending 
iristocrat. Then Robert Browning 
(Basil Rathbone) wrote to Miss 
Barrett congratulating her on her 
joetry and the plot was formally 
aid for "The Barretts of Wimpole 
Street" by Rudolph Besier. 

Katharine Cornell who is acting 
is her own producer in the present 
:our will have acted this play nearly 
300 times when she steps from the 
stage of the City Auditorium to- 
light. She has had in the past many 
triumphs in such productions as 
'Candide", "Casanova", "The Age 
)f Innocence", and "Will Shakes- 
Deare". The director of tonight's 
entertainment is Gutherie McClin- 
tic and the setting and costumes 
ire by Jo Mielziner. 

At the end of the first interview 
between Robert Browning and Eliz- 
abeth Barrett, the great poet ex- 
claims: "Dear Miss Barrett, what a 
splendid beginning to our friend- 
ship! We have known each other 
for a bare half hour and yet we've 
ordered each other about, and 
we've almost quarreled! Could any- 
thing be happier and more promis- 
ing?" That speech may be said to 
express the theme of the play. 



Honor 

The Committee on Scholarships 
announces to all holders of Fresh- 
man Scholarships each fall that the 
four receiving the highest grades 
during the first semester will re- 
:eive an additional scholarship of 
$50. These prize scholarships are 
awarded this year to the following 
lolders of Freshman Scholarships. 
Ihe average of the grades for the 
first semester is indicated in each 

E>e: 
n Augusta Espe 95.00 % 
rbert Frank Newhall ....94.167 

Dorothy June Elston 93.889 

four of the holders of Freshman 
Scholarships tied for the fourth 
place, each with an average grade 
pf 92.50%. The fourth $50 prize 
is accordingly divided into four 
parts, one part for each of the 
four: 

Jean Catherine Crawford 
Mary White Hyatt 
Pauline Kimi Kurachi 
Mary Volgin 



Sphagetti 



NOW PLAYING! 

TOGETHER 
For the First Time ! 

JANET 

GAYNOR 

and 
LIONEL 

BARRYMORE 

in 

"CAROLINA" 

: RIALTO= 

TOMPKINS HOME OWNED ^^ 



M arc h I "l»» a s^u J Hap Packard, Willie Meinholtz. 

,. . r i and iots of it was the piece de in j *i . m n j i t- 

w see the rea hzation of a one * j- i_ v . • t» ud Alston, Nancy Uugdale, Jim 

win see me icdiiiauuu <ji a iun 5 resistance at a dinner given by Kate ' r- e- 

cherished dream of Kappa Alpha Corning at the Delta Gamma house Kansom - hllen P err y, ^ re d Simp- 
Theta, according to recent infor- I last Friday night, Feb. 9. Those en- son, Carol Hurley, Red Lemaster, 
mation, when ground will be broken tertained wer e Virginia Sanford, and Henry Preskar. 
for the erection of their new lodge. 
Plans being drawn by Truman St. 
Clair are nearly completed. The 
new Theta home is to be erected 
directly south of the Kappa Kappa 
Gamma Lodge, with the main en- 
trance to the east. Early 19th Cen- 
tury English architecture is being 
featured, which conforms to the 
surrounding atmosphere. 




NO STRINGS ATTACHED 

You just slip them on and Zip 'em up. 

They're the trimmest shoes that ever crossed a 
campus! 

Every inch a shoe for youth from the tip of the 
leather laced toes to the base of the highly polished 
leather heels. 

ZIP into a pair today — 

Shown in brown or grey mandrucca — 



Cox Bros. 



26 N. Tejon 




ONE PREMIER PERFORMANCE 

TO-NIGHT at Eight P. M 



HERE 
THEY 

AGAIN 




The gorgeous girls of "42nd Street", "Gold Diggers 
^and "Footlight Parade" All Dressed Up irt Fansl . . 

j&^FOIUEW'IOM 

THE SCREEN'S FIRST GREAT LAUGH EXTRAVAGANZA — with Song* and Music! 



Future legislators attention! Col- 
ege graft is a legend on many cam- 
si, but we all doff our hats to the 
vague rumor that the president of 
he University of Missouri Student 
:ouncil paid the paltry sum of 
$3,750 for his job and the atten- 
dant glory. 




8 



THE TIGER 



Friday, February 16, 1934 



OCIAL 



CHAPEL CALENDAR 
Tuesday, Feb. 20, 10:00 a. m. — 

Chapel Service. 

Speaker: Dr. Lloyd Shaw, Supt. 
Cheyenne School. 
Subject: "George Washington." 
Wednesday. Feb. 21, 5:15 p. m. — 
Organ Recital, by Miss Leta 
Gale, Assistant Organist, and 
Miss Ruth Montgomery, soprano 
soloist. 
The Public cordially invited. 

Benefit Bridge 

All sorority women are invited to 
attend the bridge party given by the 
Colorado Springs branch of the 
Woman's Panhellenic Association, 
Saturday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock 
in Bemis Commons. Proceeds of the 
party will be used for the benefit of 
the scholarship fund of the associa- 
tion. Reservations may be made 
with Mrs. Irl Foard and Mrs. Her- 
bert Turpie. 

Oh, Have a Heart 

Members of W. A. A. responded 
heartily to this unique line in the 
invitation which was to bring them 
together in celebration of their 
fourth anniversrry. The valentine 
motif was carried out in the decora- 
tions of the rooms and dinner table. 
Many birthday presents were pre- 
sented to the organization, includ- 
ing a lamp, victrola, rug and other 
miscellaneous gifts. The entertain- 
ment in the capable hands of Anne 
Espe was such as to make the even- 
ing a complete success. 

Snow 

With the heaviest snow fall of 
the year came the participation by 
C. C. students in many and varied 
v\ inter sports. Skipping over the 
gentle art of snow balling on the 
campus, especially the snow balls 
thrown by Stan Ryerson and With- 
ers Cool, and the trials of wading 
through three feet of water when 
crossing the streets, there were such 
sports rs skiing, tobbogoning. and 
s'edding enjoyed by "snow" en- 
thusiasts. 

Miss Marion Fezer and Miss 
Catherine Ryan made a striking pic- 
ture in their brightly colored ski 
suits as they sn Hied forth on Satur- 
day rfternoon to inspect the campus 
en ihcir skiis. 

On Sunday evening a bob-sled 
was seen c?reening wildly up Tejon 
Stree behind Wilton Cogswell's 
black ro.-drter. Precariously pevch- 
f-H on ibe sVd were Hester Jane 
Butcher. Lucv Blackmail, Dick Hall. 
Alice Heisom, f»nd Lew Crosb". 

Af''-r 'r'lrmilv meeting on Mon- 
day ni rhl the Phi Delt;> Theta chap- 
ter nied 'self to the arc t out-of- 
doori and went bob-sledding unti! 
far into the night. 



SOCIAL CALENDAR 
Saturday, Feb. 17 — 

Panhellenic Benefit Bridge 
Tuesday, Feb. 20 — 

A. S. C. C. Meeting 
WMnesday, February 21 — 

University of Colorado vs. C. C. 
at Boulder 
Friday, Feb. 23— 

Colonial Ball 
Saturday, Feb. 24 — 

University of Colorado vs. C. C. 
here 

Kappa Kappa Gamma Subscrip- 
tion Dance 

Kappa Sigma Initiation Dance 
Sunday, Feb. 25 — 

Newman Club 



The Charming Figures 

of Mack Sennett's Bathing Beau- 
ties have nothing on the C. C. Mer- 
maids who will take to the water 
tomorrow in the Broadmoor pool 
in the annual swimming meet, 
sponsored by the Women's Athletic 
Association. The contest is schedul- 
ed to get under way at 2:30 o'clock 
with Miss Clara Haeker and Miss 
Marian Fezer in charge. Each sor- 
ority, along with the independents, 
will enter a team, although any one 
is eligible to enter who has fulfilled 
the requirements of three hours in . 
the pool this week. There will be a 
prize awarded to the group scoring 
the most points, and also one for 
the high-point entrant. The events 
will include many novel races with 
the acrobatic diving stunts climax- 
ing the afternoon. Judges include 
Mrs. G. E. Ehrman, Cecil Burghard 
and Coral Sherwood. Miss Haeker 
extends a hearty invitation to this 
free fun fesl. 

Bridge 

and boots mingled at the party 
given for the Kappa Kapna Gam- 
ma active chapter by the pledges on 
Saturdry afternoon, Feb. 10. Since 
it wrs necessarv to scramble thru 
the deep snow banks to reach the 
Kappa lodge, the hostesses and 
guests were forced to dress in at- 
tire more practical than atractive. 
Between games, the bridge players 
rushed outdoors to engage in snow 
fights rnd to take pictures of the 
said fights. 

The two bridge prizes were won 
by Martha Murray and Emma Lou- 
ise Jordan. 

At the close of the party, sand- 
niches and coffee were served. 

Visitors 

to Larrmie over the n?st week- 
end and spectators of the basket- 
ball aames were Mary Jean Mac- 
^innlrl Elizabeth Evans, Lois Wal- 
dorf, Richard McMahon. and Albert 
Daniels. 



Carrie Co-ed's Letter 

Dear Sis — 

Have you ever wondered what 
college girls read? Neither had I 
until I started searching for some 
reading matter in a spare moment. 
The suggestions I received were 
amazing. 

Ihelma Gardner offered me 
"Marks of an Educated Man" by 
Wiggin, and though she is reading 
it for an education course, confes- 
sed that she found it very interest- 
ing. We even got into a hot discus- 
sion as to the proverbial pliancy of 
youth etc. 

Betty Foster suggested "About 
Ourselves", by Overstreet. She has 
been reading it since September and 
claims she can not tear herself 
away from it when started. A psy- 
chological volume, written in a lay- 
man's style and within the most un- 
mitiated's grasp. 

Various people produced torn 
magazines for light reading. The 
"Maudie" stories by Graeme and 
Sarah Lorimer in the Ladies Home 
Journal are entertaining and clever. 
"Maudie" represents the better ele- 
ments of all the cuter girls I have 
met so far. 

The New Yorker gives some girls 
satisfaction. The department "Talk 
of the Town" gives about five pages 
of chatter and comment about ev- 
erything from Mae West to Mr. 
Porter Adams of Thetford, Ver- 
mont. 

And then of course I was offered 
the usual collection ranging from 
modern novels such as "Little Man 
— What Now?" by Fallada, down 
through the home and companion 
magazines with their respectable ar- 
Ixles on raspberries and their bene- 
fits, to "Judge" and "Ballyhoo". 

One sweet child, even dug out a 
magazine whose name I dare not 
mention lest mother read this. So — 
having wasted most of the spare 
moments in idle search I borrowed 
Miss Kinniburgh's "Cosmopolitan" 
rnd retired. I'll start in on Thack- 
eray next week, as father has been 
suggesting for ten years. 

Must sleep 
Carrie 



Initiation 

The Wooglin bird was seen flying 
over the Beta Theta Pi house or 
Sunday afternoon, Feb. 11, at 
which time initiation services were 
being held for Messers David Ba- 
ker, A. J. Cronk, Edward O'Neil, 
Harrison Lee, Stanley Reid, Wilmei 
Hemming, William Paddock, Wil- 
liam Sode, Ronald Rolph, Roy 
Wolfe, James Walsh, Thomas DiW 
lingham. Following the initiation, a 
banquet was held at Stratton Park 
Inn. 



BERWICK 

ELECTRIC CO. 

Call Main 939, Rear 15 E. Bijou 






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Fine Portraiture 

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Plaza Hotel Building 




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KNITTING SHOP 

All the Smart Shades for Spring ■ | 
in lovely Scotch Knitting Yarns. 
Very Reasonable Prices. Open 
from 9 to 5. 

27 E. Bijou— M. 1815 



m 



PIG SANDWICHES 

REAL HAMBURGERS 

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OPEN 



ALL DAY 
ALL NIGHT 



Draught 
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128 South Nevada Ave. 



riday, February 16, 1934 



THE TIGER 



Ti re$fone 

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Complete Lubrication 

Motor Oils 

Batteries and Repairing 

Firestone Anti-freeze 

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"Red Head" Car Heaters 



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WE WASH 
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* 



+ 



The best way to tell of the 
beauty of Colorado, Stand- 
ley's Color Pictures, Hand- 
Colored — 35 cents up. 

H.L.Standley 

PHOTOGRAPHER 

224 No. Tejon St. 

Colorado Springs 



* 



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COLORADO COLLEGE 




Palmer Hall entrance 



"IN STEP WITH THE MARCH OF TIME" 

Since 1874 outstanding among the 
highest ranking colleges of the 
country for its close super- 
vision of students, thor- 
oughness of training, and 

healthful location, 
COLORADO COLLEGE 
again steps for- 
ward in the a- 

doption of 
a New PLAN 

permitting 
greater freedom 
in choice of sub- 
jects under expert 
guidance to insure the 
best procedure in fields 
of concentration. A LIBERAL 
ARTS COLLEGE, C. C. offers com- 
plete foundational courses for 
advanced study. For catalog write 




Palmer Hall portico 



William D. Copeland, Secretary, 
Colorado College, 
Colorado Springs, Colorado. 



C. B. HERSHEY, A. M., ED. D., Acting President 



10 



THE TIGER 



Friday, February 16, 1934 





• • 



• people know it! 



Same thing with a good ciga- 
rette or a good wood-fire. 

All you need is a light. 

And all you want is a cigarette 
that keeps tasting right whether 
you smoke one or a dozen. 

That's what people like about 
Chesterfields. You can count on 
them. They're milder — and they 
taste better. 

In two words, they satisfy. That 
says it. 



Chesterfield 

the cigarette that's MILDER • the cigarette that TASTES better 



© 1934, Liggett & Myers Tobacco Co. 



(JpOlDlDHBeiB 

^ "INN" 

ACROSS FROM MURRAY'S 



Strachan's 

SWEET SHOP 

Bijou and Nevada 



Colorado College 

TEXT BOOKS 

AND SUPPLIES 

C. C. and Fraternity 

Stationery 

Laundry Bags — $2.00 Each 

Murray Drug Co. 

Across From the Campus 



ParticularWork 

FOR PARTICULAR PERSONS 
AT NO HIGHER COST 

Smith Bros. 

CLEANERS, DYERS, HATTERS L 
13-15 E. Kiowa Phones 1221-1222 



* 



fioward's 

C^9Barber 

B Shop 
V3 



19 East Bijou Street 



— 4 



IRA C. DUGAN 

Jeweler and Optometrist 

Fine Watch and Clock Repairing 

Eyes Examined — Glasses Fitted 

— Lenses Duplicated — 

Phone Main 1702-J t N. T.jon St. 



Pack Bags 
Laundry Bags 
Hikers Supplies 

THE OUTWEST 
TENT and AWNING CO. 



M. 1261 



18 E. Kiowa 



To Maintain 
A Payroll in 
Colorado Springs 




HEW 
COAL 

Phone Main 577 




<r 



'-^\ 




K 



The House of Cards 

It is an inherent quality of human nature to falsify grim reality 
with the gainless glitter of fool's gold; likewise it is characteristic 
of nature's favored animal to over-compensate for those few realities 
which may penetrate this hypocritical barricade, with trifling attempts to 
lay our shortcomings at the other fellow's door. With this synthetic 
philosophy we slide downward in a fatuous lethargy until our house of 
cards falls of its own flimziness. 

This house of cards may be likened to the spiritual stagnation which 
characterizes the COLORADO COLLEGE student body; our grim real- 
ity the fact that no longer can we exist upon the fool's gold of oysterish 
optimism. We have undermined the structure of our student organiza- 
tion with an overwhelming emphasis upon self until unity and coopera- 
tion are buried under a mass of egotistical manipulation. You and I have 
traded the birthright of color and tradition left to us for a .mess of 
pachydermatous (thick skinned) pottage. May the powers-that-be grant 
that this realization does not come too late. 

Realization alone however, will not affect a remedy for the situa- 
tion. Now is the time for concentrated action. We must work together, 
not only for the reconstruction of our organizational structure but for 
thei salvation of our principles as individuals. As a starting point, the 
COLORADO COLLEGE TIGER presents the following outline of edi- 
torial policy to be carried out the balance of the school year. 

1. The appointment of a committee upon traditions to eliminate 
activities which are no longer significant and to revive those that are 
worth while. 

(Continued on page 2) 






j> 




Issued each week during the academic year. Entered at the >ost Office at Colorado Spring! as Second-Class Matter. 



THE TIGER 



Friday, February 23, 1934 



Couture's 

FRENCH CLEANING & 

We Solicit Your Patronage 
DYEING CO. 



218 N. Tejon St. 

Colorado Springs, Colo. 

Phone Main 1288 



Keep Up with the 
Business World! 



Enroll Now at 



Blair 



O COLLEGE 



De Graff Building 



ntmtn t tnntntm t nnnmmmtmmm 



Ask Roy 
about It! 

We Sell — Rent — Repair 
and Exchange 

Every Make 

Typewriter 

AND 

Adding Machine 



The 

Typewriter 

Man 



125 N. Tejon St. 
Phone Main 95 




n»tnm»»»»»»» t »»»»ntnt»» tm> 



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WE WASH 
EVERYTHING 
WITH 
IVORY SOAP 

THINK 

WHAT THAT 

MEANS 

(^j)carl 

LAUNDRY 

Phones M. 1085-1086 



.Loading a pipe, son, 
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, "jVTOTF//^o// want to build a fire you've 
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easy to light up. 

"It's pretty near the same way in smoking 
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a sensible package 
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ranger Rough Cut 



the pipe tobacco that's MILD 
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PHOTOGRAPHS 

The Gift that only you can give 
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BERWICK 

ELECTRIC CO. 

Call Main 939. Rear 15 E. Bijou 



VOLUME XXXVI 



THE TIGER 



COLORADO COLLEGE WEEKLY NEWS-MAGAZINE 



Number 21 



♦ e a m p ii 



Koshare 

George M. Cohan, outstanding 
star of radio, screen and stage, 
supplies a double background for 
"The Tavern," thriller, mystery- 
comedy to be given shortly after 
the first of March by Koshare of 
COLORADO COLLEGE. 

Cohan not only supplies the 
authorship of the show but made 
it a smash hit on Broadway for an 
extended run as the male lead. 

Tryouts for the 15 speaking 
parts were held Tuesday afternoon 
at 4 p. m. in Cogswell theatre, at 
which time a tentative cast was 
picked. The final designations of 
players will be announced in a fu- 
ture edition of THE TIGER. 

The production has never been 
shown in movie version, but has 
proved a sensation both in profes- 
sional and amateur stagings. Dates 
for the presentation of "The Tav- 
ern" will be announced at a later 
date. 



* 



New Members 

Ko.,hare of COLORADO COL- 
LEGE announces the pledging of 
Gratia Belle Blackman, Lucy Black- 
man, Fred Handke, Marion Mar- 
riot, Gordon Parker, Charles 
Strang, Gratia Wrye and Walter 
Wrye. The initiation was held at 
the home of Prof. Arthur G. Sharp, 
Jr., 1600 N. Cascade on Tuesday 
evening, Feb. 19. 

Following the initiation and the 
regular business meeting, a come- 
dia del arte play was presented by 
the new initiates. The play they 
chose was "Little Red Riding 
Hood", with Marion Marriot play- 
ing the title role, and Walter Wrye 
as the big bad wolf. The members 
►hen ^eeirled to have the "Three 
Bears" and the following cast was 
elected: 

Papa Bear — John Cruzan 
Mamma Bear — Martha Murray 
Baby Bear — Pro. Arthur Sharp 
Goldie Locks — Anna Margaret 
Daniels 

While refreshments were being 
served, by the new initiates, an ex- 
citing Murder game was played, 
and during the course of cross-ex- 
amination by District Attorney 
Sharp, Miss Pauline Johnson was 
convicted of a horribly cold blood- 
ed and maniacal crime. 



The Federal Employment Agen- 
cy is conducting a drive next week 
to put 2,000 men to work. Any- 
one having work or odd jobs are 
urged to communicate with the 
agency immediately. 



C. W. A. 

Mr. Hopkins, Federal Relief Ad- 
ministrator has set up a program of 
part-time jobs for college students. 
Twenty-four men and eleven women 
in COLORADO COLLEGE are now 
receiving this government aid, el- 
even of whom were not registered 
during the first semester. 

Part of the men will do some 
much needed work on the campus 
under the direction of Mr. Baylis. 
Others will work under the direc- 
tion of Mr. Irish on the Athletic 
Field. They will probably paint the 
bleachers and do other constructive 
work. Two boys have been assigned 
to Miss Kinniburgh to do some re- 
pair work in the dormitories, while 
another will do clerical work at the 
Administration building. 

The women will work on catalog 
cards in Coburn library, typing for 
research study, sorting and labeling 
museum material, secretarial work 
for professors, clerical assistance in 
Remis office, and additional work in 
Bemis Dining room. 

The allotment to each college is 
based on an average of $15 for 
e-ch student employed per month. 
This fund will be available during 
the remainder of this academic 
year. 

K=ujpa Dance 

Saturday night, Feb. 24, Kappa 

K^ona Gamma will entertain with 

a bridge-dance in the ballroom of 

I the Antlers hotel. An outstanding 

dance band from Denver will pro- 

I vide the music. 

Bridge will start at 8:00 o'clock 
m the Antlers' card rooms where 
Mrs. Kenneth Pomeroy will be hos- 
tess. The dancing will begin at 
9:30. 

Tickets may be obtained from 
members of Kappa Kappa Gamma. 

Radio Pedagog 

Government from the lips of 
1 men who run it, is the innovation 

in the teaching of Political Science 
1 introduced in the classes of Miss 

Edith Bramhall this semester. Each 
i Tuesday the class in American 

Government assembles a t Dr. 

Bramhall's home and listens to one 

of a series of radio addresses o n 
; state and municipal problems by 

men prominent in Governmental 

affairs. 
I Last Tuesday the class heard an 

address by Mayor LaGuardia of 

New York City. The talks are at 
'5:15 o'clock. 



Cripple Creek 

is the subject of the essay written 
by Lura Lou Wallace which has 
gained recognition as a valuable ac- 
count of those "good ole days." It 
is a history of the old mining town 
written in a style as lively as the 
events. Miss Wallace not only used 
many books as references but she 
also consulted persons who knew 
Cripple Creek in the booming days. 
It tells especially of the big strikes 
that occurred there, which are vis- 
ualized by actual photographs of 
the most exciting scenes. It is a de- 
tailed picture of the wild life as 
compared to the refinement of Colo- 
rado Springs at that time. 

Dr. Malone together with the au- 
thor agreed to present the essay to 
the library. Miss Kampf is having 
the book bound as it will prove val- 
uable for references. 

Miss Wallace was graduated with 
the class of '33 and is now working 
for her Master's degree. 
Lecture Series 

Beginning March 1st Dean Mc 
Murtry will give a series of lectures 
on "The Man. Christ Jesus". These 
addresses will be delivered in the 
nave of the Chape] on successive 
Thursdays. 

"This group of addresses, formula- 
ted out of years of study are now 
being offered for the first time", 
said Dean McMurtry. In this series, 
which is without charge, the public 
has a rare opportunity to study the 
life of Christ. 



Revival 

of old tradition, A. S. C. C. 
Council has proposed an all-college 
Dicnic to replace the Varsity Jubi- 
lee which has been held the last 
few years. As originally the Jubi- 
lee was planned to supplant the 
all-college picnic, the return to the 
outdoor fest will be no new idea on 
the COLORADO COLLEGE cam- 
pus. 



Beauty Queens 

The annual beauty contest spon- 
sored by the PIKES PEAK NUG- 
GET will be held in assembly next 
Thursday, Mar. 1 . At this time the 
student body will select the twelve 
most beautiful girls in COLORADO 
COLLEGE. 

The contest is being conducted 
somewhat differently this year, in 
that for the first time in several 
years previous winners will again be 
eligible. 

The first announcement of the 
winners will be at the Junior Prom, 
to be held Friday, Mar. 16 in the 
ballroom of the Broadmoor Hotel. 

The final judgement and selection 
of winners will be left to a national- 
ly known celebrity whose name has 
not yet been announced. 



To Return 

According to reports given from 
the president's office, Dr. Lewis W- 
Abbott, professor of Economics and 
Sociology at COLORADO COL- 
LEGE, is expected to return from 
Washington, D. C. on or about 
March 1. 

Dr. Abbott, nationally known for 
his degree of proficiency in his 
chosen field of Economics and So- 
ciology, while at the capital was 
working with the Federal Agricul- 
tural Commission as consultant in 
regard to conditions prevalent 
among the agricultural workers in 
Southern Colorado. 

Returning with Dr. Abbott is 
Mrs. Abbott and family, who have 
made their home in Washington for 
the past two months. 



Initiation 

The last formal initiation in the 
history of Delta Alpha Phi was 
held in the chapter house on Sun- 
day afternoon, Feb. 18. Mr. Eu- 
gene Beucker of Pueblo, a former 
student at the University of Colo- 
rado, was initiated as an honorary 
member. The initiates are Robert 
Glew, Thomas McConnell, William 
Davis, Willis Deits, Richard Jones, 
and Ben Kirby. 

The initiation dinner, served at 
one o'clock, preceded the formal 
initiation ceremonies. 



Dvnamic 

Lloyd Shaw, principal from 
Cheyenne Mountain hiah school, 
and noted for his individualistic 
ideas in education was guest speak- 
er Tuesd^v morning, Feb. 20. dur- 
ing the Chapel hour. His subject 
consisted of an entirely different 
characterization of George Wash- 

| ington. 

Interpolating his remarks with 
such pithy rejoinders as "Thou 
shalt not read while the speaker 

j speaketh." Shaw became sn 
wrapped up in his subject that he 
removed his academic gown and 
gave the balance of his talk in a 
conventional gray business suit. 

Washington was revealed not. 
"as a man who, as a storybook 

, character, bored me," but as a man 
of destiny, a vigorous country 
gentleman whose convictions rested 

I in his faith in an almighty force. 



THE TIGER 



Friday, February 23, lap! 



14 



THE TIGER 




Editor 



LEW CROSBY 



Business Manager E. F. STAPLETON 

EDITORIAL STAFF 

Editors: Managing F.ditor, Bob Johnson; Campus Editor. Joseph Lowe; 
Sports Editors, Harold Marlowe, John Ricknell ; Society Editor. Alice Her- 
som; Makeup Editor. Martin Legere : Pictorial Editor. David Dentan : Ex- 
change Editor, John Dickey ; News Editors, Miller Stroup. Edith Weaver, 
Peg Swan, Albert Stuhblefield. Fritz Baker ; A. W. S., Ernestine Stroup ; 
W. A. A.. Louie Marie Mason. 

Society staff -- Luzilla Eubank. Mildred Fritchle. Muriel McClanahan. 
Sarah Mclntyre. Caroline Morrison, Lyda Roark, Sally Tompkins, Jane 
Walker, Imogene Young. Makeup staff — Edith Gaylord. Exchange staff — 
Charles Mncdonald. Sports staff — Ronald Rolph, James Ransom, Dick Al- 
son, David Waters. Proof readers — Lucy Blackman. Frances Stevenson. 
News staff — Jake Johnson, David Dentan, Gilbert Baylis, Alice Sutton, La- 
Rue Wiley. Nanet Meredith, Claire Sweany, Elvira Cortellini, Ruth Mary 
Webster. Esther Alexander. Charles Dewing, Ken Hall, Jennie Conway. 
Mark Schreiber. Marybel Poer, Ruth Liverman. Margaret Stewart, Ann 
Daniels. Conrad Brown. Dale Ashbaugh. Frank Johnson. Jean James. Doro- 
thy Elston. Helen Miller. Ellen Perry, Susan Braerton, Dick Hall, Emma 
Louise Jordan, Virginia Botsford, Roberta McKay. 

MANAGER'S STAFF 
Tom Patterson - Assistant Business Manager. Staff: Dave Waters, Ken 
Markel, Dave Baker. Otis Elliot. A. J. Cronk. Circulation Manager — Bob 
KclKy. 



2. The appointment of a committee to organize and superintend 
worthwhile programs for student assemblies. 

3. Reorganization of the enthusiasm committee. 

4. The establishment of a unit of entertainment to facilitate 
COLORADO COLLEGE contact with high schools. 

5. The concentration of the publicity policy for the best interests 
of COLORADO COLLEGE. 

6. The evolution of the present system of "secret" combines into 
political parties. 

7. A committee appointed to plan and to superintend all-college 
entertainments, ALL OF THE RETURNS FROM WHICH TO BE DI- 
VERTED INTO A STUDENT-CONTROLLED SCHOLARSHIP FUND. 

This program is but a skeleton about which a more definite struc- 
ture will be built in subsequent editions of the COLORADO COLLEGE 
TIGER. You will have the final say as to whether we are successful, just 
as you will be the principal benefactors in the work of reconstruction. 
But, we remind, you, NOW IS THE TIME TO BEGIN. 

We do not offer this as emanating from a sensation-addling pen- 
chant for blanket criticism. This editorial and the foregoing editorial 

program has evolved and is backed by the representative group of COLO- 
RADO COLLEGE students whose names are undersigned 

Don Glidden, 
Jack Conley, 
Martin Legere, 
Henry Finger, 
Harry E. Fontius, Jr. 
Fred Miles, 
Richard Hall, 
Lew Crosby. 

+ Petty Thievery 

which has increased in practice on the COLORADO COLLEGE cam- 
pus as to constitute a serious problem, is not only an example of the un- 
principled depravity which qualifies a certain element in this institution, 
but is also a reflection upon an organization which permits it. These ne- 
farious creatures, not content with confining their activities among the 
"brothers" in the different social organizations, have gone so far as to 
make it unsafe to leave valuables in the Cossitt gymnasium. Several 
athletes who can ill afford the loss have beea thus victimized. The 
TIGER will take the preatest pleasure in publicly denouncing any indi- 
vidual proved to be a campus sneak thief. 




Always the Finest Tobacco 



US 



Copyrlcht. 1934, Ttao American Tobacco Company. 



TZJ 



Iriday, February 23, 1934 



THE TIGER 




ENDS 




tke tobacco 
does notsj?if/out 



Every Lucky Strike is made from 
the finest tobacco and only the 
center leaves. Not the top leaves — 
because those are under-developed 

— not ripe. They would give a harsh 
smoke. Not the bottom leaves — be- 
cause those are inferior in quality. 
They grow close to the ground, 
and are tough, coarse and always 
sandy. The center leaves are the 
mildest leaves, for which farmers 
are paid higher prices. Only these 
center leaves are used in making 
Luckies the fully packed cigarette 

— so round, so firm — free from 
loose ends. That's why Luckies 
draw easily, burn evenly. And 
remember— It's toasted" — for 
throat protection — for finer taste. 



V the Center Leaves 



Direct from the 
Metropolitan Opera House 
Saturday at 1:45 P.M., Eastern 
Standard Time, over Red and Blue 
Networks of NBC, Lucky Strike 
presents the Metropolitan Opera 
Company of New York in the com- 
plete Opera, Tannhauser. 




NOT the top leaves— they 're under-developed 
—they are harskl 

The Cream of the Crop (^ 

The mildest, smoothest tobacco" 



NOT the bottom leaves— they're inferior in 
quality— coarse and always sandyl 



CAMPUS CHIC 

Materials of thrilling variety and 
texture will make up the spring 
costumes of the campus co-eds this 
season. Without rushing the season, 
the co-eds will satisfy their craving 
for bright colors with fresh touches 
! of pastel silks and gay flowery 
prints. 

Suits have an amazing choice for 
materials; rough sport-like tweeds, 
smooth woolens, and soft boucles 
for loud sports jackets, and the 
more flamboyant the race-course- 
like checks, the smarter the suit. 

In cotton fabrics there will be 
the popular seersuckers, linen, anr 
ginghams of charming checks. In 
silks this will be a big season, fea- 
turing a medium pattern of early 
spring blossoms. Sheer elfin mater- 
ials for evening with silver and gold 
interwoven threads, metalic notes, 
and glistening mermaid scales will 
contrast with black taffeta gowns 
and short velvet capes. Organdies 
of delicious fresh stripes will bright- 
en m?ny a ball room. And so, af- 
ter a long exposure to dark clothes, 
warm days and exciting evenings 
will be welcomed joyously. 

The recent inter-society swim- 
ming meet gave the co-eds an op- 
portunity to show the latest in 
aquatic styles. 

Gratia-Belle Blackman and Jean 
Horan wore suits whose straps 
crossed over the back and circled 
the waist, tying in front. Little 
white helmet-like caps covered 
their curls. Gratia-Belle's suit is 
white and Jean's is pale green, 
which is most becoming to her 
warm winter tan. 

Dodo Skidmore and Emma 
Louise Jordan had white Jantzen 
suits and white belts and caps, 
which are most striking when these 
two sun worshippers acquire their 
deep summer coat of tan. 

Mary Jo Sparkman dared that 
which no other co-ed could, and 
was successful because of her gor- 
geous figure. She wore a shining 
bhck tank suit. 

Sarah Ina Tompkins swam her 
way to high score in a merry light 
blue Jantzen with which she wore 
a white rubber belt and bathing 
cap. 

Mary Hyatt wore a rich blue 
suit which was low in the back. 

Nancy Dugdale and the Forbush 
sisters wore two-piece suits which 
bid for coming popularity. Nancy 
was cute in blue jersey shorts and 
a blue and white checkered scarf 
of gingham. Ruth's suit w a s of 
black shorts and a red knit bras- 
siere. Edith's is black shorts and 
black top which ties around the 
I neck and across her back. 



THE TIGER 




Intellectuals 

The following is a list of women 
students with an average of 85 or 
over for the first semester 1933-34: 
Freshmen 

Ann Espe 95.00 

Dorothy Elston 93.90 

Barbara Dutton 93.34 

Lois Ward 93.34 

Jean Crawford 92.50 

Eileen Elizabeth Hale 92.50 

Mary Hyatt 92.50 

Pauline Kurachi 92.50 

Mary Volgin 92.50 

Mary Bledsoe 91.67 

Muriel Hess 91.67 

Ruth Martin 91.67 

Jean Burgess 90.84 

Doris Shock 90.00 

Jane Wahtola 89.60 

Louise Arens 89.17 

Fannie Bulkley 89.17 

'p-n C-rney 88.34 

Susan Braerton 88.34 

Ruth Marv Webster 88.34 

Priscilla Swan 87.50 

Jean Winston 87.50 

Alice Boatright 86.67 

Margaret Kelley 86.67 

Mary L. Gilmore 85.84 

Caroline Morrison 85.84 

I ucy Blackman 85.00 

Jennie Conway 85.00 

Doris Wylie 85.00 

Sophomores 

Hariett Henke 91.67 

Joanna Jollv 90.84 

Katherine Ragle 90.84 

Marjorie Avalon 89.17 

Julia Dunham 89.10 

Mary Jo Srjarkman 88.34 

Margaret Stewart 88.34 

Anna Margaret Daniels 87.50 

Edith Forbush ....87.50 

Elizabeth Dewing 86.67 

Elizabeth Lovitt 86.67 

Lois Anne Weber 86.67 

Marv Eleanor Lynch ...85.84 

Natalie Wittichen 85.00 

Juniors 

Francesca Hall 96.66 

Mary Mansfield 94.17 

Margaret McCoy ...93.34 

Roberta McKay 91.67 

Muriel McClanahan 91.00 

Hester Butcher 90.00 

Audrey Gill 90.00 

Elizabeth Rayner 90.00 

Jane Roberts 90.00 

Dorothy Skidmore 90.00 

Flizabeth Heaton 89.17 

Dorothy Laberborg 89.17 

Norma Garrett 89.17 

Malvina Trimble 89.17 

Martha Skioldahl 88.77 

Ruth Crawford 87.94 

Harriett Engle 87.50 

Mary Fisher 87.50 

Imos?ene Young 87.50 

Helen B^dv 87.40 

Leonna Dorlac 87.10 

Helen Dentan 86.67 

Florence Robinson 86.67 

Jane Walker .... 85.84 

Anne Pachak 85.84 

Helen Haney 85.84 

Emma Louise Jordan 85.84 



Alice Hersom 85.00 

Elpha Bowman 85.00 

Seniors 

Loretta Kekeisen 85.83 

Katherine Waters 95.00 

Genevieve Raitinger 94.17 

Mary Strang 93.34 

Bemice Faught ...93.17 

Louie Marie Mason ...92.50 

Phyllis Maust 91.67 

Edna Harlan 91.67 

Mae Skaer 91.67 

Rosalie Spiller 91.27 

Flora Morris 91.00 

Helen Margaret Shaw 90.84 

Dorothy Christenson ...90.00 

Margaret Shelton 90.00 

Nrdine Kent 89.47 

Evelyn Richter 89.17 

Rose Azar 88.34 

Florence Andersen 87.50 

Ruth Edwards 87.50 

Wilhelmine Meinholtz ...87.50 

Victoria Kneip 86.67 

Ruth Laughlin 86.67 

Melba Mohler 86.67 

Ruby Foster ...85.84 

Mary Elizabeth Pitts 85.44 

Genevieve Affolter 85.00 

lean Horan 85.00 

Katherine Lingham 85.00 

Co-ed Independents 

The Broadmoor pool was the 
scene of a big splash party last 
S^t'irday afternoon when coeds 
vied for swimming honors in the 
annual meet. Leading teams were 
the Independent with a tallv of 44 
points, Delta Gamma, 33, and 
KaDpa Gamma, 23. Sally Tompkins 
Delta Ga^m led the ''-"Hivid"^ 1 
i scoring with 26 points. Mary Jo 
; S^rkman, Independant, with 24 
I points was runner-up. Jean Horan. 
I K*nn^ Kappa Gamma was third 
with 18 points. Roses were ?w r d»*'' 
the winners. Judges were Coral 
Sherwood, Mrs. Ehrman, and Cecil 
Burghardt. Miss Marion Fezer was 
starter, Miss Dorothea Carleton, 
scorer, and Ruth Edwards, an- 
nouncer. Clara Haeker was in 
charge of the meet. 

Sabbath day skiing at Crystola 
■ was the diversion of the hiking 
group last Sunday. Those enjoy- 
ing; the tumbles, chills, thrills, and 
spills of the sport were Mary Jo 
Sparkman, Norma Garrett, Audrey 
Gill. Eleanor Hastings. Coral Sher- 
wood, Eileen Hale, Roy Hastings, 
Harrison Lesch, and Arthur Roe. 

New Pledges 

Beta Omega of Kappa Sigma 
announces the pledging of the fol- 
lowing for the second semester: 

Gordon Gallup, Denver; Pat 
Woods, Grand function: Don 
Chapman, John Whaley, Colorado 
Springs. 

NOTICE 

The History Club will meet on 
Sunday, Feb. 25, at 8:00 p. m. at 
the home of Prof. C. C. Bayley, 
317 E. San Rafael St. 



A bowl of Kellogg's Rice Krispies with milk or 
cream restores the energy that studies take out 
of you. You'll sleep better and feel better in the 
morning. 

So delicious and so easy to digest. No other 
rice cereal is like Kellogg's Rice Krispies in 
flavor or nourishment. And only Rice Krispies 
snap ancK crackle in milk or cream. 

Try Kellogg's Rice Krispies tonight. A grand 
dish after a party or date. Ask for them at your 
campus restaurant or eating club at breakfast or 
lunch. Extra delicious 
with fruits or honey 
added. Rice Krispies 
are served everywhere. 
Made by Kellogg in 
Battle Creek. 




Listen!— 



RICE 
KRISPIES 

«acU, s 1N CREAM 




4 

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■■'/• 

■■■■■■■ 



SHEFF & SON 

SUPERIOR FORD SERVICE 
827 N. Tejon M. 1317 



BISSEL'S PHARMACY 

HENRY E. COPEI.AND, Prop. 

A Tiger Booster 

Tel. M. 980 Corner Dale and Wober 

PROMPT DELIVERY 



THE TIGER 



Friday, February 23, 1934 




On 

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Counters 

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PLUMBING & HEATING 
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226 N. Tejon M. 48 



THE SOCIAL CALENDAR 

Friray, February 23 

The Colonial Ball 
Saturday, February 24 

University of Colorado vs. C. C. 

Kappa Kappa Gamma Subscrip- 
tion dance. 

Kappa Sigma Dance 
Sunday, February 25 

Newman club 

History club 
Tuesday, February 27 

A.W.S. 

Euterpe 
Wednesday, February 28 

W. A. A. 

Alpha Kappa Psi 
Friday, March 2 

Phi Gamma Delta dance 

Sigma Chi dance 
Saturday, March 3 

C. S. T. C. vs. C. C. 

Delta Alpha Phi Dance 

Gamma Phi Beta dance 

DON'T FORGET THE COLONIAL 
BALL 



Birthday Party 

Following the basketball game 
on Saturday evening, Feb. 1 7, the 
birthdays of Betty Barrie and Ruth 
Liverman were celebrated with an 
informal party at the Delta Gam- 
ma house. Their guests were Mar- 
guerite Dixon, John Bicknel, Nan- 
cy Dugdale, James Ransom, Paul- 
ine Hoopes, Donald Smith, Virgi- 
nia Sanford, Harold Packard, Sal- 
ly Tompkins, Howard James, Hel- 
en Walker, Birt Slater, Keith Rid- 
dock and Lamar Price. 



DON'T MISS THE COLONIAL 
BALL 



Bohemian Tea Dance 

With gambling in Monte Carlo, 
dancing in the Silver Glade, and 
tea and cookies served at the blue 
and blue bar, the Kappa Kappa 
Gamma active chapter entertained 
in honor of the pledge class at a 
Bohemian tea dance given on Fri- 
day afternoon, Feb. 16. 

The gambling tables were run 
by Harry Fontius, Martin Legere, 
Ladislaus deHolczer, and Melvin 
Sheldon. Those winning at the 
games of chance were Barbara 
Dutton, Lois Ward, Park Eckles, 
and James O'Brien. The chaperons 
were Prof, and Mrs. Carroll Ma- 
lone, Mrs. John Crouch, and Mrs. 
E. L. Mosely. 



Luncheon 

A snow ball fight between ac- 
tives and pledges was the cocktail 
served at the Kappa Alpha Theta 
luncheon which was held at t h e 
chapter house on Saturday, Feb. 
1 7. Following the luncheon, the 
pledges entertained the actives with 
a selection of clever little stunts. 



CHAPEL CALENDAR 
Tuesday, Feb. 27, 10:00 a. m. — 

Chapel Service 

the speaker will be Dr. Marion 
Hall of Boston. 



Carrie Co-Ed's Letter 

Dear Sis — 

Last week the current boy friend 
conceived the brilliant idea of 
dragging me to a wrestling match. 
Can you imagine that? And before 
I start let me tell you that I loved 
it. 

The gala affair was held over at 
Cossitt. I was amazed at the fe- 
male representation. Before going 
I had had a chill feeling around 
the ankles that there would be 
mobs of guys, all of whom would 
peer at me and draw some un- 
pleasant conclusion. But such is 
the way of men that I gave in and 
went, with the dire suspicions that 
this was not a good move. 

I felt much better when I saw 
some of the good old standbys 
sprinkled around the audience. 
Mrs. Wrye was there with a brand 
new puppy, which diverted consid- 
erable attention. And Mary Tyson 
full of enthusiasm. And of course 
Don and Pauline on good terms 
for the evening, and Dave and Do- 
do, the ever-faithful pair of o n e 
month's standing. 

At first it all looked very foolish. 
The eggs just walked around hold- 
ing each others heads. Then one 
of them would back into the ropes 
and it would start all over again. 
Presently one would lie down on 
his back and the other would en- 
deavor to give him a complete 
workout. Everyone would holler 
and make such hullaballoo for no 
good reason at all. No doubt I'm 
not up on my wrestling technique, 
but they tell we it's a great sport. 
I even got excited later on, when 
some of the contestants started 
prancing around, and put on an 
obvious struggle, for their very 
existence apparently. Nice stuff. 

Anyway — the education con- 
tinues in leaps and bounds. I have 
now been to a wrestling match, a 
situation I never expected myself 
to figure in. So what next? It 



would seem I have lots to learn 
before becoming a cosmopolitan in 
this old world. 

Ignorantly yours — 

Carrie. 




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Friday, February 23, 1934 



THE TIGER 



PORT 



Pioneers 23 — Tigers 13 

In a dual meet held at Cossitt, 
the Demer University wrestling 
squad returned to the Pioneer insti- 
tution last week with a 23-13 win 
o\er the Tiger wrestling team. In 
the lighter divisions the C. C. grap- 
lers just couldn't pin down their op- 
ponents. Ruslin, McConnell, Miles, 
and Price were all thrown one after 
the other by the r mere experienced 
foes. In the 155 pound class, Hick- 
ey, D. U., won a decision over Ar- 
nold, C. C, with a time advantage 
of seven minutes and forty-seven 
seconds. 

Johnson, C. C. 165 pound man, 
threw Williams, D. U., in eight min- 
utes and fourteen seconds. This was 
the most interesting bout of the 
evening. Haines and Winters looked 
good and were the only other point 
makers for C. C. Even though the 
Waite boys bowed to defeat, they 
looked much better than their form 
displayed in previous meets. 



Gracias, Cowboy! 

Before the last series of games 
played by the ligers, our colleague 
at an upstate school in his column 
entitled the "Dope Bucket" blasted 
forth with the following: 

"Colorado College tangles with 
the Miners twice, once at Colorado 
Springs, and once at Golden. It will 
make no difference to the Tigers; 
they will win easily in both games. 
Mines are the division cellar occu- 
pants, and C. C. is probably the 
second best team in the Eastern sec- 
tor." 

"Of greatest interest is the game 
between Colorado College and 
Colorado U. at Boulder. This battle 
will decide who is runner-up to Wy- 
oming in the division. We think that 
State has been slipping the past 
couple of weeks, while the Tigers 
showed here last week that they 
have a plenty neat outfit. As a long 
shot, we pick the Tigers to beat the 
Silver and Gold." 



Bouquet of Roses 

COLORADO COLLEGE present- 
ed to their former coach a bouquet 
of roses with a calling card attach- 
ed which spelled victory for Mines 
Friday night (the first conference 
win for the Blasters in two years, 
and their first win in 31 starts). Let 
it never be said that the Tigers are 
not patriotic and true to a former 
player and coach. It was the most 
surprisins? defeat ever taken by a 
Bengal five, who only a week be- 
fore gave the Wyoming Cowboys 
the hardest pair of games they 
played during the 1934 campaign. 
Over confidence and "easy soup 
was written all over the Bengals' 
jerseys as they encountered a weak 



and what they thought a slightly 
demoralized Miner five. 

At the Bengal lair the next even- 
ing, the Tiger boys were out for 
revenge and trounced off the hard- 
wood with a 33-23 defeat poured 
onto the Blaster five. 

Even in triumph the Bengals 
looked sad Saturday, missing set- 
up after set-up and connecting only 
when it was least expected. The 
game was uninteresting and slowed 
up by numerous fouls. A noticeable 
improvement will have to be the 
result of this week's practice if the 
Bengals expect to take two in a 
row from Boulder. 



Colorado University's 

Press Box Says: 

"Eights and nines will not interest 
Colorado university if the subject 
of an eight or nine team conference 
should come up at the eastern div- 
ision meeting in Denver on Feb. 24. 
This was authoritatively learned last 
night in an interview with Dean 
Harry Carlson, director of athletics 
for the University. There has been 
much talk of the coming meeting 
and recently, mention has been 
made by one of the sports writers 
who is "in the know" of agitation 
for a "Big Nine." 

Said Dean Carlson last night, 
"Colorado university is not inter- 
ested in an eight or nine conference. 
There is no good reason for divid- 
ing the Conference in that manner." 
Since Colorado Aggies has also 
turned thumbs down on the eight 
team division, there is little chance 
that the Ft. Collins school will 
change its vote on a nine school 
grouping. 

As we pointed out in our first 
column, an eight team conference is 
loo big, and it is also unfair to the 
teams left out. Nobody would be 
satisfied. The same objections exist 
for the formation of a nine team 
group. It merits the early death 
which it will in all probability get 
at the meeting next week. 



night. If, however, a regular misses 
a foul shot in a competitive game 
he is required to shoot 100 free 
throws per night. 50 practice foul 
shots are added for each shot mis- 
sed during a game. 

The squad average at practice 
sessions are 40 out of 50 tries. 

Al Pimat and Charles Stone gar- 
ner 43 out of 50 free tosses each 
night at practice. 

The most misunderstood man in 
the world sometimes has his lucid 
moments. Dr. Stratton, of Univer- 
sity of California, "He has times 
when he puts aside the scientific 
viewpoint and becomes almost po- 
etic in his observations. When he 
looks at a eucalyptus tree, for in- 
tance, he always doesn't define it 
in botanical terms. He is perfectly 
capable of exclaiming over the 
magnificent altitude of the big 
vegetable." 



"Cut it doubt," she cried as she 
passed doubt. From a philosophy 
term paper by a sweet young 
thing: "Doubt can include any- 
thing in doubt except doubting. 
Doubt cannot be doubted away. A 
doubter is involved in a doubting 
activity; if there is a doubt there 
must be a doubter. Attempt to 
doubt without limit discloses a lim- 
it, hence, I doubt, therefore I am." 

Crazy without a doubt. 

— L. A. Junior Collegian. 



Nugget Pictures Deadline Mar. 1 



At Colorado college there is ai 

established custom of serving te 

informally to faculty and student; 

on afternoons during final weel 

between four and six o'clock 

(Most of our students seem to neec 

more than tea to revive them!) 
••■ ••• ••» 

Nugget Pictures Deadline Mar. 1 

Upon observing the notice, 
"Dates Assigned for English Ex- 
ams," a University of California 
student remarked, "There are 
hardly any functions here where a 

fellow can stag it anymore." 
-•• .•• ••• 

The Interfraternity Hop at Mon- 
tana State is a novel affair. Men 
must wear cords and a sweater or 
jacket. They must meet their dates 
in the hall and not trade dances 
with fraternity brothers. Girls must 
wear house dresses, no make-up, 
and no jewelry and must pay 50 
per cent of the evening's expense. 
Chaperons must also abide by these 
rules. A representative from each 
fraternity is present with a paddle 
and "time out" is taken to punish 

all violators. 

■•■ -•■ ••• 

The Fordham Ram claims it is 
quite easy to distinguish whether a 
man went to college or not. At the 
sound of a bell the college man will 
always rise and start to leave. 

Nugget Pictures Deadline Mar. 1 



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Fine Portraiture 

Official Nugget Studio 

Plaza Hotel Building 





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"You take 50 and I'll take 50." 
These words can be heard almost 
any night at the Hill Top gym at 
Denver U. These University of Den- 
ver cagers hitting 90 percent of 
their foul shots in conference games 
gives mute testimony to the efficien- 
cy of "Cac" Hubbard's free throw 
system. 

In the two games of last week 
members of the Pioneer squad buc- 
keted 20 out of 24 chances from the 
foul line. This is about a 90 per- 
cent average which tops good free 
tossers by 20 percent. 

Hubbard requires every man on 
the squad to shoot fifty fouls each 




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Friday, February 23, 1934 



THE TIGER 



KEYHOLE 
EEPER 



Offstage impressions of Kathar- 
ine Cornell after seeing her beau- 
tiful performance in "The Bar- 
retts": Huge shaggy brown pile 
coat, softly rumpled gray felt hat 

[with a little feather in it 

igrayish face enhanced by shad- 
owed eyes and maroon lipstick . . . 
dramatically gesturing hands . . . . 
one of the company calling her 
"Kit" .... gray double breasted 
flannel suit .... large smiling 
mouth .... teeth .... carrying 
a dascshund .... running after 
another one .... screaming at 
Flush (who is nearly blind and 
deaf with age — probably the rea- 
son he acted so well) . . , . . a viv- 
id, alive face but not particularly 
beautiful .... rather largish hips 
and legs .... cutting a pink and 
white birthday cake on the train 
. . . . February 16 really was her 
birthday . . . .eyebrows totally un- 
important .... whole effect cas- 
ual. 

Dr. Gilmore in a session: "Every 
week I read that Keyhole Keeper 
and it gives me a pain in the neck" 
. . . . After thinking over the mat- 
ter, Marion Marriott returned Bill 
Paddock's Beta pin after keeping 
it overnight .... "The. Complete 
Druggist", by Izaak Walton Mur- 
ray, or "Everything from Whiskey 
to Whitewash" .... Freeland 
Carde and Barbara Dutton out to- 
gether twice last week .... Delta 
Alph pledges on answering the 
phone reel off the whole fraternity 
and college history in one breath 
. ... try it some time .... because 
Kay Corning presumed to argue 
with Mr. McMurtry in Bible class, 
Boy-lnend Henry Preskar became 
terribly provoked at her .... for 
what is probably the first time in 
years that chaperons have exer- 
cised their powers, one couple was 
asked to leave the Beta sweetheart 
dinner dance on Valentine's Day 
. . . . John Craig and Art Sharp 
struggling over the new make-up 
box made for Koshare by Ray Eb- 
eling, trying to get the doors to fit. 
. . . one word description of R a y 
Fries — chinny .... Liverman 
came up from Dern's candy store 
with cinnamon covered coat . . . . 
leaned in the cinnamon barrel, no 
doubt. . . . since last week, Rol- 
lins has purchased a fuchsia col- 
ored shirt to go with the decidedly 
green sweater .... Edith Gaylord 
coming out of the Antlers . . . . 
thumb nail drama: In the library 
came Dave Griffith and sat down 
beside Dwight Beery. After one 



filthy look at Griff, Beery picked up 
his books and moved to another 
table. Reason: The Kappa Sig 
house at Mines was burgalrized of 
$300 worth of silver trophies Fri- 
day night, the night Tigers played 
Mines ?t Golden, and bosom friend 
Dame Rumor has it that thieves 
were local Phi Gams revenging the 
Mines theft of their highly valued 
plaster-paris tiger last spring. Kap- 
pa Sigs here heard about it before- 
hand, sent a telegram to Mines' 
Kappa Sigs, but the measage 
reached Golden five minutes after 
the clean sweep . . . Loren Mar- 
croft and Willis Parkison calling 
each other chiselers .... at the 
actives' request that he keep h i s 
beard on during hell week, Grap- 
pler Joe Rustin promptly shaver it 
off, thus breaking the vow he made 
that he a razor would not touch 
his face until the Tiger wrestlers 
won a meet. 



Comparison 

The registration for the second 
semester of this year shows a de- 
cided increase in the percentage of 
the first semester students returning 
for the second semester's work. At 
present, the second semester regis- 
tration is over 96% of the first se- 
mester registration. 

For the past five years, the reg- 
istration for the second semester 
has been between 87% and 90% 
of the first semester registration. 
The increase this year is explained 
in part, but not wholly, by the pro- 
visions of the Federal Government 
to pay for part time jobs for a 
limited number of students. 

Registration for the second se- 
mester at the end of t h e second 
week was as follows: 

1933-34 1932-33 

Freshmen - - - 179 151 

Sophomores - - 110 161 

Juniors - - - - 134 99 

Seniors - - - - 88 124 

Specials - - - 39 37 



550 572 



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THE TIGER 



Friday, February 23, 1934 




ach year Turkey and 
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Saturday 

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Issued each week during the academic year. Entered at the'ost Office at Colorado Spring! aa Second-Clan Matter. 



THE TIGER 



Friday, March 2, 



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THE TIGER 



VOLUME XXXVI 



COLORADO COLLEGE WEEKLY NEWS-MAGAZINE 



Number 22 



♦ e A M P u 



Liberal 

Professor Ralph J. Gilmore, 
known to the students of COLO- 
RADO COLLEGE as a sincere 
friend and unsurpassed instructor, 
was born in Williamsport, Pennsyl- 
vania and is a graduate of Lehigh, 
University. 

Prof. Gilmore received his di- 
ploma at Lehigh in 1907 his Mas- 
ter's degree in 1910. He taught Bi- 
ology there for two years. 

Gilmore taught Biology at Cor- 
nell from 1910 to 1914 and then 
went to Western Reserve as th*; 
acting professor of Biology. After 
teaching four years at Huron Col- 
lege, South Dakota, he came to 
COLORADO COLLEGE in 1919. 




DR. RALPH J. GILMORE 

He arrived in 1919 . . . 

As an undergraduate Dr. Gilmore 
majored in law. He states that a 
"knowledge of law is very valuable 
to a Biologist". In addition to his 
law major he was editor of the col- 
lege paper and annual. 

The greater portion of Professor 

Gilmore's research is done with the 

structure and habits of "water- 

kdogs". He says that gathering 

jdogs" is his greatest recreation. 

In pdditions to his good nature 
and jokes, he has a Phi Beta Kap- 
pa key in his pocket. 

Carry On 

This seems to be the theme of the 
COLORADO COLLEGE Alumni 
Association in California. The Gol- 
den Gate Chapter is, on March 3rd, 
holding another of their group par- 
ties, this time in the form of a ban 
quet to be served in El Azteca at 
Oakland. The dinner is to be follow- 
ed by native music and dancing, 
with of course, as the program 
reads "the old time COLORADO 
COLLEGE visiting." The present 
officers of the Chapter are: 
Presirent - - Edwina Foss, '26 
Vice President - 

- - Mrs. Lora Perryman Weber 
Secretary -Mrs. Frank Seeley, '21 



Humor 

tolerance and sincerity were 
high points stressed by speaker 
Marion Hall of Boston in Chapel 
service Tuesday. His subject was 
"The Present Turmoil in Japan in 
Relation to the Christian Message." 
His version of the much-discussed 
Japanese policy in Manohukuo laid 
the cause to the militaristic faction 
iri Japan. A strong minority, com- 
posed for the greater part by Jap- 
anese Christians, was characterized 
as Pacifistic and opposed to strong- 
arm tactics. 

High point of the lecture was 
the use of a Buddhist-Christian 
baseball game as an example of 
the growing influence of Christian- 
ity in Japan. Interesting was the 
fact that, for the second consecu- 
tive week, the conventional speak- 
er's garb of academic black was 
pushed to the background in favor 
of a business suit. 

In regard to the ever-interesting 
topic of Russia and the United 
States against Japan in the next 
war, Hall tersely summed up t h e 
situation with, "Ridiculous." 



Brains Plus 

Notified the evening before by 
personal visits from Dr. McMurtrv, 
secretary-treasurer of the COLO- 
RADO COLLEGE chapter, 1934 
Phi Beta Kappa's newly elected 
members were announced in chaq- 
el Tuesday morning. Elections were 
made by a committee of 21 faculty 
members, all Phi Betas. 

Those honored were Francesca 
Hall and John Sims of the junior 
class, both of Colorado Springs; 
seniors were David Bemmels, Dor- 
othy Christenson, Ruth Edw?rds, 
Edna Harlan, Loretta Keikisen, 
Louie Marie Mason, and Martha 
Murray all of Colorado Springs; 
Bernice Faught, Anapolis. 111.; 
C'arence Keyho, East St. Louis, 
111.; Carl Maynard, Pueblo; Robert 
Morgan, Grand Junction; and 
Melvin Richter, Denver. 

Formal initiation of t h e group 
will be held Monday evening at 8 
o'clock at the home of Dr. and 
Mrs. McMurtry, 1335 N. Nevada 
Ave. 



Prep Visitor 

Professor H. E. Mathias of 
COLORADO COLLEGE is visiting 
high schools in Denver during the 
week end. Saturday afternoon 
Prof. Mathias will speak before a 
meeting of the Colorado College 
Alumnae Club which will be held 
at the home of Mrs. H. E. Fontius. 



Dorothy Sands 

Reputations of a desirable sort 
are not customarily easy of achieve- 
ment. Actresses have been known 
to work for years to achieve one 
sentence toward a "good press". 
But this is not true of Dorothy 
Sands who appears for the first 
time in Colorado Springs at the 
Chief Theatre, Friday March 9th. 
In New York, the ordinary theatri- 
cal reputation is the result of hun- 
dreds of appearances, hundreds of 
reviews without mention of more 
than one's name as "also of the 
cast", hundreds of sentences of 
faint praise, if of any praise at all. 
But Dorothy Sands' reputation was 
not ordinary in its acquisition: its 
acquisition was immediate. Miss 
Sands had only to appear as a 
"one-woman theatre" a first time, 
and her reputation was made. Not 
a critic but immediately perceived 
her singular gifts. Their praise was 
such that it might well have been 
envied by our greatest actresses. It 
did not stutter, hesitate; it was 
profuse. The theatre world knew at 
once a great talent again had ap- 
peared. And immediately it knew, 
the world knew. For The Literary 
Digest, not given to noticing minor 
rumpuses, immediately quoted at 
length the New York reviews, so 
that even in the remotest villages 
people knew Miss Sands had ap- 
peared, had been a triumphant suc- 
cess. Her costumes, gestures, genius 
were known in Kenosha almost as 
soon as they were in New York. It 
is thus that only the most extraor- 
dinary talent becomes known. That 
talent is Miss Sands'. 

The American Association of Un- 
iversity Women, who brought Cor- 
nelia Otis Skinner to Colorado 
Springs several years ago, are spon- 
soring Miss Sands appearance here. 
The profits from this production will 
ko to the Fellowship Fund of the 
Association. 



Anapolis Appointment 

Freeland Carde, a sophomore at 
COLORADO COLLEGE has re- 
cently received an appointment to 
the United States Military Acad- 
emy at Anapolis, Maryland. Carde 
took the competitive examination 
last December and was high man in 
Colorado. His appointment was re- 
ceived through Senator Edward P. 
Costigan. Carde is a member of 
Beta Theta Pi fraternity and has 
taken part in a number of Koshare 
productions. 




Last Monday 

at their regular meeting the 
members of Kappa Alpha Theta 
elected a new staff of officers for 
this semester. The major officers 
are as follows: 

President — Lucille Swartz 
Vice President — La Rue Wiley 
Treasurer — Florence Robinson 
Rec. Sec'y — Betty Rayner 
Cor. Sec'y — Betty Heaton 
Elizabeth Evans was selected to 
represent this chapter in their na- 
tional convention to be held this 
summer at Groove Park Inn in 
Ashville, North Carolina. 



"The Tavern" 

a play written by George M. 
Cohan, is to be the next Koshare 
production. This play is unusual 
in that it combines mystery, melo- 
drama and comedy in a new and 
unique manner, according to its 
director, Arthur Sharp, Jr. Copies 
of the play have been ordered and 
the fifteen characters will be chos- 
en shortly after the script's arrival. 
Mr. Sharp displayed great enthusi- 
asm in speaking of "The Tavern" 
as he anticipates that it will be the 
outstanding production of the year. 



Nugget Pictures 

Following the announcement l n 
last week's edition of the COLO- 
RADO COLLEGE TIGER that the 
deadline for Nugget pictures was 
Mar. 1 , so many students joined in 
a last-minute rush that the dead- 
line will be extended for one week. 
Editor Emma Louise Jordan has 
stated that March 8, will be t h e 
final date on which pictures may be 
taken. 

Organizational groups are urged 
to have pictures of their members 
taken this week. Pictures may be 
had from Payton Studio at 30 S. 
Tejon St., Wa°;ner-Fults Studio in 
the Burns Building, and at Emery's 
Studio, 1 7 E. Cache la Poudre. 



Beta Omega of Kappa Sigma an- 
nounces the pledging of Gordon 
Gallup of Denver, Colorado. 



Colorado Beta of Phi Delta 
j Theta announces the pledging of 
Robert Keeton of Manzanola, Colo- 
rado. 



THE TIGER 



Friday, March 2, l!| 



THE TIGER 




Editor 



LEW CROSBY 



Business Manager E. F. STAPLETON 

EDITORIAL STAFF 

Editors: Managing Editor, Bob Johnson; Campus Editor, Joseph Lowe; 
Sports Editors, Harold Marlowe, John Bicknell ; Society Editor. Alice Her- 
som ; Makeup Editor, Martin Legere ; Pictorial Editor. David Dentan ; Ex- 
change Editor. John Dickey ; News Editors. Miller Stroup. Edith Weaver, 
Peg Swan. Albert Stubblefield, Fritz Baker ; A. W. S., Ernestine Stroup : 
\V. A. A., Louie Marie Mason. 

Society staff — Luzilla Eubank, Mildred Fritchle. Muriel McClanahan, 
Sarah Mclntyre, Caroline Morrison, Lyda Roark, Sally Tompkins, Jane 
Walker, Imogene Young. Makeup staff — Edith Gaylord. Exchange staff — 
Charles Macdonald. Sports staff — Ronald Rolph, James Ransom, Dick Al- 
son. David Waters. Proof readers — Lucy Blackman, Frances Stevenson. 
News staff — Jake Johnson. David Dentan. Gilbert Baylis, Alic« Sutton, La- 
Rue Wiley. Nanet Meredith, Claire Sweany, Elvira Cortellini, Ruth Mary 
Webster. Esther Alexander, Charles Dewing, Ken Hall, Jennie Conway, 
Mark Schreiber. Marybel Poer, Ruth Liverman, Margaret Stewart, Ann 
Daniels, Conrad Brown, Dale Ashbaugh, Frank Johnson. Jean James, Doro- 
thy Elston. Helen Miller. Ellen Perry. Susan Braerton, Dick Hall, Emma 
Louise Jordan, Virginia Botsford, Roberta McKay. 

MANAGER'S STAFF 
Tom Patterson — Assistant Business Manager. Staff: Dave Waters, Ken 
Market, Dave Baker, Otis Elliot, A. J. Cronk. Circulation Manager — Bob 
Kelley. 



^ Contact 

with high school students is a vital part of the COLORADO COL- 
LEGE building program for the future. And yet we have no active 
participation in COLORADO COLELGE in the two activities which 
could best be used for publicity — a school band and a glee club. Else- 
where in the TIGER will be found sufficient reason for establishment of 
the latter. As for the band, our present unit is worse than no band at 
all. The unpleasant comparison, even in appearance, with other bands 
in the conference is nauseating. The uniforms, a hodge podge of scrap 
material featuring wierd combinations of faded orange and black ?re a 
counterpart of the feeble enthusiasm for which they stand. Organiza- 
tions with much less excuse for survival receive aid from the Associated 
Student Body which could be well used to purchase band uniforms and 
to provide necessary music and trips. The student body might even for- 
get themselves once or twice a semester and plan a worthwhile series of 
benefit entertainments to swell a band-uniform fund. In a year the jeers 
prevalent when a COLORADO COLLEGE band straggles by in review 
might well be changed to cheers. 



+ Motivation 

is another important item in the reconstruction of a band and the 
organization of a school glee club. If one-fourth unit of school credit 
was allowed for a semester's work in each of these activities it would 
provide added incentive for participants and at the same time would 
provide a check on absence from rehearsals. A trip or two a year would 
give students a goal toward which to work and the publicity advantage 
to COLORADO COLLEGE would be well worth the effort. And just 
remember one thing— THIS PLEA IS WASTED IF YOU HAVEN'T IN- 
TESTINAL FORTITUDE ENOUGH TO PUT IT OVER. 



Eastern Culture 

The guest speaker at the Tuesday 
morning Chapel services was Dr. 
Marion E. Hall, member of The 
American Congregational Board. 
Dr. Hall received degrees from both 
Columbia University and Union 
Theological Seminary. Shortly af- 
ter his graduation in 1910, he went 
to Kyato, Japan, as a student of the 
Japanese people. His sojourn was 
interrupted, however, by the war, 
and he returned to the United 
States. He entered the ranks of the 
Red Cross, becoming a major, and 
was stationed in Siberia. At the 
close of the war, he again returned 
to Japan, where he has become a 
professor of American literature at 
Doshisha University. He readily ac- 
quired command of colloquial Jap- 
anese to such an extent that at the 
last coronation he was selected as 
interpreter. 

Although Dr. Hall is not a mis- 
sionary he has made an exhaustive 
study of the Jaoanese religion, and 
is now known in Japan as the au- 
thority on their religion. He feels 
that Christian missionaries should 
not attempt to make the Japanese 
religious customs conform to ours, 
but rather inspire in them the spirit 
of our religion, allowing them to re- 
tain their established customs. 

Dr. Hall has translated manv 
books on Jananese culture and art. 
this having been his hobbv during; 
his stay there. He said, "Mrs. Hall 
and I know more cultured Japanese 
than any other couple who have ev- 
er gone there". As one talks with 
him, his sympathetic understanding 
of Tapan and its people is strikingly 
evident. 

Here we see another vivid per- 
sonality who has retained the spirit 
of youth in his understanding. He 
recalled manv incidents of his col- 
J lege days, which were singularly 
like those of today. Dr. Hall expres- 
sed his enjoyment in speaking to 
students, saying that he felt more 
at ease with them than with an old- 
er group. 



NOTICES 
Baseball men will start 
week. All players are reque< \ 
to bring their own equipment a | 
report for limbering up exercise: | 
Cossitt next week. 



According to Bully Van s ' 
Graaff, "Spring is here." He t 
issued a call to all pigskin wam 
to report for spring practice M 
day afternoon. 

The International Relations C 
will meet next Sunday night 
7:30 at the home of Miss Br; 
hall. Discussion will be on the n 
tion of Austria and Germany. 



Fifteen 

pledges became Sigma Chi's 
Sunday at which time Beta Gam 
held its formal initiation. Th 
participating in the final cere 
ies were: Curtis Perryman, 
Lennox, John Dickey, Dick 
son, George Clamp. Herbert C 
zen, Max Frick, Clifford Hait 
Charles McDonald, Tom Mclnt) 
Wayne Neil, James Roberts, Jan 
Riley, Robert Stagg, and Geoi 
Villans. 



rem 



New Membrs 

Larger by seven is the member- 
ship of W. A. A. The seven who 
have been invited to join the ath- 
letic ranks aie Louise Arens and 
Nannette Meredith for their partic- 
for her ability to swing a tennis 
for her ability to swing a lennic 
racquet, Muriel Hess for her part 
in the recent horse show, and Mary 
Hyatt, Fannie Buckley, and Elvira 
Cortellini for their prowess in 
swimming. A pledge meeting was 
held at the W. A. A. house last 
Wednesday evening. 



Metalury Success 

A process for the separation of 
zinc and cadmium, developed by 
COLORADO COLLEGE graduate. 
Keith Shelton, '29. has been accep- 
ted on the royalty basis by the New 
Jersey Zinc Company. 

. After receiving his Bachelors de- 
gree in Chemical Engineering from 
COLORADO COLLEGE. Shelton 
went to the Bureau of Mines Lab- 
oratory at the University of Utah 
for his master's degree. Later while 
teaching at that institution he de- 
veloped the process which the New 
Jersey Company has purchased. 



The Inkas, 

is the mystifying name chosen 
for the new COLORADO COI - 
LEGE Literary club which will 
meet next Thursday evening at 
7:30 in Cnssit Commons. 

Dr. A. E. Daehler will read se- 
lections of his own choosing at the 
meeting and anyone who is inter- 
ested in Literature is invited to at- 
tend. 



Flying 

will be taught at the low cost 
of five dollars an hour, if plans for 
a COLORADO COLLEGE flying 
club materialize. Alumnus Richard 
Ragle, '30, is sponsoring the move- 
ment and expects the organization 
to be functioning next semester. 

Ragle is a graduate of March 
and Kelley fields, both Army train- 
i ing schools in California. 



TITANIC ADVENTURE 
j Anthony Adverse — Hervey Allen 

i If you are carrying twenty hoi 
| and five labs per week (Bible 1 1 
eluded), and the usual two dam 
and one show per week-end 
would not advise your getting P 
thony Adverse from a rental 
brary at the rate of two cents p 
day. 

Mr. Allen's book, which is nc 
on its 166th thousand copies, 
unique. First, it contains T 
pages of small type. Secondly, 
is, to be trite but truthful, "al 
Iutely fascinating." When 
have conquered the fear that si 
you when you gaze at the sizi 
the book and you bring you 
to timidly open to page one 
are lost. Once started you cal 
put it down. It is high advent 
during history's most romantic 

Never is there a dull line as 
follow the life of Anthony Adv 
from the decaying splendor 

Italy - - - to Cuba to the 

of Napoleon I - - - Then to 
don - - a young Jew named Roth | 
child - - financial intrigue 
slave trading in Africa - - - th 
grim splendor of the court • 
Spain - - - a great plantation ove 
looking New Orleans - - - pirat 
- - - Aaron Burr's conspiracy - 
Beautiful women of all races 
murder - - - fire - - - rape - - 
venge - - - a crucifix - - - mu 

Critics say that Anthony Adver 
will join the list of the world 
truly great novels. No one who hi 
read it will dispute them. 

Don't say that I didn't wai 
you when you forget to eat < 
sleep — buried in Anthony Advers 






I 



THE TIGER 



Friday, March 2, 1934 




On 

Candy 

Counters 

Every 

Place 



The Biggest Nickel's 
worth of GOOD Candy 
You Ever Bought. Try 
It! 



t. 
A 

I 

I 

? 

? 

? 
V 
t 

i 



TEXACO 

SUPER SERVICE 
ONE STOP STATION 



WASHING— GREASING 

TIRE REPAIRING 

FIRESTONE TIRES & TUBES 

UNDER MANAGEMENT 

OF BOB PHELPS 

OUTHEAST CORNER CUCHARAS 

& SOUTH NEVADA AVE. 






WE WASH 
EVERYTHING 
WITH 
IVORY SOAP 



THINK 
WHAT THAT 

MEANS 



fGhi 




earl 



LAUNDRY 

Phones M. 1085-1086 



Colorado College 

TEXT BOOKS 

AND SUPPLIES 

C. C. and Fraternity 

Stationery 

Laundry Bags — $2.00 Each 

Murray Drug Co. 

Across From the Campus 



Oe.IAL 



SOCIAL CALENDAR 
Friday, March 2 — 

Phi Gamma Delta Dance 

Sigma Chi Dance 
Saturday, March 3 — 

C.S.T.C. vs. C.C. 

Gamma Phi Beta Dance 
Sunday, March 4 — 

Tea for the School of Letters 
and Fine Arts 

Dean and Mrs. Hershey — 24 
College Place. 
Wednesday, March 7 — 

German Club 

Polytechnic Club 
Thursday, March 8 — 

The Inkas 
Friday, March 9 — 

Delta Gamma Tea for Alumnae 

Kappa Alpha Theta Dance 

Delta Alpha Phi Dance 



CHAPEL CALENDAR 
Tuesday, March 6, 10:00 a. m.— 

Chapel Service. Speaker: Mr. 
Frank Gilles will speak on "The 
Old Violin," and there will be 
special music by a string quar- 
tet. 
Wednesday, March 7, 5:15 p.m. — 
Organ Recital. Dr. Frederick 
Boothroyd. 

Thursday, March 8, 5:00 p.m. — 
The Second in the fifth group of 
The Five o'Clock Series of Ad- 
dresses by Dean McMurtry. 
"Jesus Life as He Lived it." 

Special Attractions 

are being arranged to make the 
Junior Prom the best all-college 
dance of the year. The beauty 
queens will be introduced for the 
first time in the unique form of a 
Fashion Show. 

In addition the managers plan 
to hold a dance contest with a suit- 
able prize being awarded to t h e 
winning couple. Many fraternities 
are planning a dinner before the 
dance to which dates will be in- 
vited. The innovation of the Fash- 
ion Show will take away much of 
the stiff formality of having the 
winners of the beauty contest 
merely parade across the floor, as 
in past years. 

The Junior Prom — March 16 — 
the Broadmoor Hotel — Johnny 
Metzler's orchestra — $1.10 a cou- 
ple. 

Gamma Phi Pledging 

Gamma Phi Beta held formal 
pledging for Miss Ruth Martin last 
Friday afternoon. Miss ' Martin 
graduated from Colorado Springs 
High School as a member of t h e 
class of 1933, receiving high hon- 
ors. 

Formal initiation of pledges will 
be held tomorrow at noon in t h e 
Shove Chapel. 



Campus Chic 

• Lucy Blackman recently wore 
an evening gown which was stun- 
ning in its simplicity and lovliness 
of design. It is of a rich rust 
colored crepe and is form fitting. 
The lines of the long skirt are se- 
verely plain and it has no shoulders, 
the straps being of rhinestones. 
Soft folds of gold fall from the 
top and circle around under t h e 
arms to the low cut back. A nar- 
row belt of the dress material is 
fastened in the back with a rhine- 
stone clasp. Gold sandals and 
rhinestone hair clips were worn as 
accessories. 

Nancy Dugdale appeared at a 
recent dance this weekend in a 
lovely formal of pale blue crepe. 
Simplicity of line here again is 
found in the tight skirt which has 
a new note in the suggestion of a 
train. It has a collar which sung- 
gles up high against the throat and 
drapes down around the low back. 
Matching the gold belt, Nancy 
wears a pair of adorable gold san- 
dals, large hoop gold earrings, and 
a gold tierra in her black curly 
hair. 



Initiation 

Phi Gamma Delta formal initia- 
tion was held at the chapter house 
on Sunday afternoon, Feb. 25. The 
new initiates are Bud Alston, Rich- 
ard Alston, Willis Armstrong, Ho- 
bart Corning, Jack Greene, James 
Mclntyre, Jack Murray, Harold 
Packard, James Ransom, Robert 
Rasor, Joseph Rustin, Marcus 
Shivers, Robert Walsh. 

The formal initiation banquet 
was held at the Antlers hotel that 
evening. 



Star and Crescents 

The Kappa Sigma initiation 
dance Saturday night at Stratton 
Park, paved the way for the initi- 
ation which was held on Sunday, 
at the Shove Chapel. 

Mr. Francis Vanderbur, '31, a 
graduate of the Denver University 
delivered the explanatory address 
to the initiates. The new wearers 
of the star and crescent are, Tom 
Ross, George Fisher, Kenneth Dep- 
pen, Murrey Lorenz, Dale Ash- 
baugh, Leon Jankowitz and Russel 
Vanskike. 

A banquet at the Kappa Sigma 
house followed the initiation. 



Wooglins 

Newly elected officers chosen to 
fill vacancies for the coming year 
were elected at the Beta lodge 
Monday night. They are: Tom 
Patterson and Henry Finger, In- 
terfratemity Council Members; 
Harold Marlowe, Secretary, and 
William Sode, Recorder. 



OUT TO 
LUHCH 

at10 p - m 



It's O. K. to eat at night. Only 
be cagey. Don't burden your 
body with heavy foods. Kel- 
logg's PEP is satisfying . . . 
won't interfere with sound 
sleep at night. PEP releases 
body-energy without taxing 
digestion. Made of nourish- 
ing wheat. Flaked. Toasted 
crisp. Plus enough extra bran 
to be mildly laxative. 

PEP is ready to eat. Served 
in individual packages at the 
campus lunch or canteen. De- 
licious with milk or cream. 

Eat PEP for breakfast too. 
Add sliced fruit or honey for 
variety. Always fresh. Al- 
ways popular. Made by ^^ 
Kellogg in Battle 
Creek. 



40099* 



WA 



pluxt 






BRWi 



Keep go' 1 "* 



BISSEL'S PHARMACY 

HENRY E. COPELAND, Prop. 

A Tiger Booster 

Til. M 980 Corner Dale and Weber 

PROMPT DELIVERY 



Friday, March 2, 1934 



THE TIGER 



PORT 



Special To The Tiger 

Boulder, Colo., Mar. 2— A flare 
of the most intense rivalry in the 
Rocky Mountain Conference will 
furnish a fitting climax to the 1934 
Eastern Division basketball season 
when Colorado University and 
Denver University clash here to- 
night. For Colorado the battle will 
be of championship importance, 
since the Silver and Gold can an- 
nex the State title, as well as run- 
nerup honors to Wyoming, by de- 
feating its ancient foe. 

Denver, which has fought its 
way up from seventh place to the 
first division by winning its last 
three games, lost to C. U. by a sin- 
gle point, 24-25 at Denver three 
weeks ago. This game was one of 
the most exciting played this sea- 
son, and the return engagement 
Friday promises to be equally as 
thrilling.. By winning, Denver will 
be assured of a place in the first 
division, and possibly a tie for 
third place with Colorado Teachers 
and COLORADO COLLEGE, 
should Teachers take both games 
from C. C. this week. If C. U. loses 
to D. U. and C. C. trims Teachers 
twice, the Tigers will cop the State 
championship and second place in 
the Division. Five seniors will be 
playing their last game for Colo- 
rado Friday night. Merle Leffer- 
dink, completing his fourth season 
as a regular, Howard Yocum, 
George Grosvenor, Frank Bracy, 
and Earl Sheehan, all will end 
their college careers against Den- 
ver. Sheehan, who had not been 
out for basketball before this year, 
won the regluar center's job, and 
since the beginning of the season, 
he has developed into one of the 
best pivot-men in the Eastern Di- 
vision. 



Split Series 

The Silver and Gold representing 
Colorado Uuniversity trounced the 
C. C. Tiger on the Boulder floor 
Wednesday night by a score of 
29-18, only to lose a close game 
the following Saturday to a spirit- 
ed Tiger five who couldn't be 
stopped. The score of the second 
game was C. C. 22, C. U. 18. This 
game was a thriller from start to 
finish with the huddle system being 
used by the wearers of the Silver 
and Gold. This is the first time 
this season that C. C. has been giv- 
en the opportunity to see the hud- 
dle system in use. Livingston and 
Boothe were outstanding players 
and goal tossers of the evening 
with Rousey and Sheehan sharing 
honors for the visitors. 



Swan Song 

Tomorrow night when the Tigers 
trounce out upon the hardwood 
floor, four members of the Black 
and Gold will be wearing the col- 
ors for the last time. They are 
Glidden, Ryerson, Harter and 
Boothe, all main cogs of the Tiger 
basketball machine. Everyone of 
these players have played bang-up 
ball throughout the season and 
Glidden at the present time holds 
all state scoring honors, scoring 
more points than any other player 
in Colorado. Ryerson after being 
out most of the season has turned 
in several creditable performances. 



Teacher's College Editorial 

Students at Colorado Aggies 
favor the changing of the name of 
the instution from Colorado Aggies 
to Colorado State, which is in ac- 
cord with agricultural colleges 
over the nation. This idea brings 
up another that might be applied 
to this campus. Why not put 
"C's" on the varsity sweaters in- 
stead of "TV? 

Colorado Teachers College is a 
state institution and is entitled to 
that right. Very few of the teach- 
ers colleges in midwestern states 
which are state colleges emblazon 
the school initial on their awards 
but instead the state initial is gen- 
erally found. 

For some unexplained reason 
this change would permit greater 
prestige not only outside the state 
but within its limits. 

The prevalence of teachers col- 
leges in every state in the union 
robs us of the prestige that is due 
us. This change is a dandy oppor- 
tunity to distinguish Colorado 
Teachers from the average small 
teachers college. 



fioward's 

(^Barber 
P Shop 



19 East Bijou Street 



-* 



Time 

national weekly news magazine, 
mentions Wyoming's great basket- 
ball record as follows in its issue 
for February 19: 

"Even in the Rocky 'Mountain 
league basketball styles vary. The 
western division (Utah and Mon- 
tana) plays a slambang helter- 
skelter game resulting in high 
scores. The eastern (Colorado, 
Wyoming) tends toward conserva- 
tism and tight defense. Wyoming 
leads the league undefeated. Wyo- 
ming's ace is a tall, blond, left- 
handed forward named Les Witle, 
brother of Coach Willard 
("Dutch") Witte. In a double 
header last week with COLORADO 
COLLEGE he scored 1 7 points in 
each game, brought his season to- 
tal to 113, his four-year total 
close to 1.000." 



Dutch Clark's 

Orediggers will start baseball 
prrxtice March 6. The weakest 
spot in the Oredigger line-up for 
the coming season will be the pitch- 
ing staff. Former stars have either 
graduated or dropped from school. 
Let LeRoy, former all-conference 
pitcher graduated last year. An- 
other good tosser of last year's 
team has left school and the Clarks- 
men will miss the support of Mer- 
win Tilzey. 

Other veterans returning to t h e 
team are Kyleberg, Gleghom and 
Mitchell. These men will be t h e 
nucleus for Clark to mould a 
championship team. 

George Reed, star first bagger of 
the Mines baseball team who will 
again be seen in action this year 
with the blue and white aggrega- 
tion. Reed was honorable men- 
tion on the all-conference team two 
years ago and is a serious threat 
at the plate in any man's game. 

Such publicity as this is inter- 
preted favorably, by Wyoming 
fans, who hope to see Witte re- 
ceive all-American recognition. 



Break Jinx 

A revengeful Tiger five jour- 
neyed to Greeley Tuesday night 
and returned to the Jungle with a 
19-14 defeat over the pedagog five. 

Both teams were sadly off form, 
but the Tigers had an edge and 
treked to their home hardwood 
with a slight victory. The 1934 
Bengal curtain will be rung down 
tomorrow night when a return 
game will be played between t h e 
two teams. If C. C. turns back the 
Bear five again tomorrow and D. 
U. is successful in turning back 
Colorado University, the State 
championship will come to the 
Tiger lair. 



253 Points Per Year 

caging ten points against Colo- 
rado Teachers, after spending a 
week in bed because of a severe 
cold, Les Witte, allAmerican for- 
ward from the University of Wyo- 
ming ran his string of points to 
123 for the season's play in con- 
ference games. 

Close behind with 96 markers is 
Don Glidden, captain and forward 
on the COLORADO COLLEGE 
quintet. Glidden is the only threat 
to Witte in the race for the high- 
scoring crown of the R. M. C. 

In a survey at Hunter College, 
New York, it was found that of the 
650 freshman co-eds, only one in- 
tends to marry after graduation. 
The others are planning to work. 



4 



Pack Bags 
Laundry Bags 
Hikers Supplies 

THE OUTWEST 

TENT and AWNING CO. 



M. 1261 



18 E. Kiowa 



To Maintain 
A Payroll in 
Colorado Springs 




COAL/ 

Phone Main 577 



W. I.LUCAS 

— HAS— 

EVERYTHING IN SPORTINC 
GOODS— 

"Tigers Always Welcome" 

120 North Tejon Street 
Main 900 



Say Boys — 



Campbell's 

Barber 
at Shop 

109 East Pikes Peak Ave. 



jllllllllllllllllllllllllMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIII Ill III 111 111 01 



•S* i ii iii i ii i ii 1 1 it 1 1 ii ii 1 1 ii 



ONLY THE 
CENTER LEAVES FOR 







"*».* <' f, * **« "S 



This picture tells better than words 
the merit of your Lucky Strike. 
Luckies use only the center leaves. 
Not the top leaves, because those 
are under -developed — not ripe. 
Not the bottom leaves, because 
those are inferior in quality — they 
grow close to the ground and are 
tough, coarse and always sandy. 
The center leaves are the mildest 



leaves, the finest in quality. These 
center leaves are cut into long, even 
strands and are fully packedinto each 
and every Lucky — giving you a ciga- 
rette that is always round, firm, 
completely filled — no loose ends. Is 
it any wonder that Luckies are so 
truly mild and smooth? And in 
addition,youknow/Tt'stoasted" — 
for throat protection, for finer taste. 



Lucky Strike 

presents the 

Metropolitan 

Opera Company 

Saturday at 1.50 P. M., 
Eastern Standard Time, 
over Red and Blue Net- 
works of NBC, Lucky 
Strike will broadcast the 
Metropolitan Opera 
Company of New York 
in the complete Opera, 
"Lucia di Lammermoor" 




ffi 



Always the Finest Tobacco 



Copyright, 1934, The American Tobacco Company. 



TZ 



and only the Center Leaves 




NOT the top leaves — they're under- 
developed — they are harshl 

Cream of the Crop f^ 



The mildest, smoothest tobacco" 



NOT the bottom leaves- they're inferior 
in quality— coarse and always sandy I 



THE TIGER 



Friday, March 2, IB'. 



Scholastic 

averages for the second semester 
have been made public by the office 
of the Dean of Men for all men stu- 
dents who averaged 85 or over for 
the first semester. Last week THE 
TIGER published a similar list for 
women students. 

Following is the complete list of 
men students which is printed al- 
phabetically bv classes: 
FRESHMEN 

Albrecht. J. P 85.83 

Alston, Bud 90.83 

Alston, R. C 85.00 

Armstrong, W. E 85.83 

Barron, T 87.00 

Brown, C. M 90.83 

Dickey, J 85.83 

Lusic, R. F 89.17 

Newhall, H 94.17 

Ross, T 88.33 



Kintz, Jack 90.55 

Mackintosh, Albyn 95.00 

Mackintosh, Chas 93.89 

Ragle, Richard 95.00 

Roe, Arthur 95.00 

Note: All graduate students listed 
above carry 3 half-courses, with the 
exception of Erickson, J. R., who 
carries 4 half-courses. Some of 
these Graduate Students are part- 
time assistants. 



Rolph, 
Strong, 
Sutton, 
Tudor, 



Ronald 86.11 



C 91.67 

L 85.00 

W. D 85.83 

SOPHOMORES 

Dentan, David _ 90.83 

Green, James 91.67 

Kimball, Merrit 90.83 

Lewis, Ernest 91.67 



1-oesch, Harrison 
Parker, Malcom . 
Peterson, Evan . 
Riddoch, Chas. 
Stevenson, Paul 



8667 
90.00 
85.42 
90.83 
88.83 



Young, Frank 90.00 

JUNIORS 

Baylis, Gilbert 85 

Brooks, Richard 92 

Carson, Ben 89 

Davis, Clyde 93. 

Dewing, Chas 91 

Effinger, Cecil 85 

Finkelstein, Max 90 



Grimwood. Alfred 93 

Hedblom, Ear] 86 

Heinieke, Alfred 87 

I amasure, Robt 90 



I ivingstone, John 
Rasor, Robt 



86 

85. 

Rollins. Robt 85 

Rule, Kenneth 90 

Sims. John 90 

Smith, Gerald 94. 

Swem, Chas 92 

Ward, Wayne 95. 

Williamson, Henry 89, 

SENIORS 

Arnold. J. F 85 

Remmels. David 93 

Boothe, Joe 85 

Conley. lack 83 

Eckles, Park 87 

Handke. A 86 

Hibbard. Robt 86 

Kehoe. C 94 

Kirk, Geo 86 

Maynard, Carl 91 

Mihalick, John 89 

Morgan, Robt 93 

Owens. Owen 85 

Peck. Wallace .... 85 

Reid, George 89 

GRADUATE STUDENTS 
Erickson, J. R 89 



83 
50 

,7 i 
33 i 

67 I 

00, 

00 

33 

67 

50 | 

00 ] 

67 I 

83' 

00 | 

00 ; 

00 

17 

50 

66 

44 

83 
33 
00 
67 
50 
67 
33 
.17 
67 
67 
17 
.33 
00 
.33 
.17 

.17 



Men of Colorado College 

For some time you have been dis- 
cussing and wanting a Glee Club. 
Now's your chance! 

Tryouts are now being held in 
Room 8, Perkins Hall, every morn- 
ing. If you have a voice and can 
talk, you have as good a chance as 
anyone. If you can sing, swell. If 
you want to sing — now's your 
chance. This is to be of course ar- 
tistic, but it also is to promote 
group singing, to give men a little 
recreation, to take minds off studies, 
?nd to help C. C. in usins; talent. 
If you want to try out or to get 
plans, come to Perkins Hall t"d 
set the dope. You've been asking 
for this so now it's up to you to 
coonerate and help yourself. 

The school has put up money for 
music, now men if you are real men 
show them you appreciate it, and 
put it over. We'll have fun, and 
good times and yet be getting some- 
thing from school besides facts, 
dates, and a lot of routine work 
that one forgets immediately after 
taking the examination. 

If you are pessimistic about it, 
change your minds right now! 
We're going to put this through! Is 
C. C. to go on being only a school 
of classes? Are we to let other 
schools in the conference get ahead 
of us in anything — even a Glee 
Club? Think that over, even if other 
factors won't make you want to 
help out, SCHOOL SPIRIT should! 

A concert and operetta will be 
given in April, with a possibility (if 
performance is good enough) of a 
trip over the state. THAT'S UP TO 
YOU! Don't figure that your voice 
isn't good enough. Maybe there's a 
part suitable to your size, person- 
ality, and type of voice. Don't give 
up until you've heard the final ver- 
dict. 

So, Room 8, Perkins Hall, and 
we'll give every man on the cam- 
pus a trial and the low-down on 
the C. C. MEN'S GLEE CLUB. 

This will be under the direction 
of myself. 
Yours 

Jack Kintz. 



JDOROTHT SAMD, 



America's greatest mimic famous star of the 
Grand Street Follies" 

Main Floor - - - $1.50 Loges 

Balcony $ .75 Gallery 



$1.00 

$ -25 



CHIEF THEATRE, MARCH 9 



<r 



MAKE YOUR DATE NOW ! 



-FOR— 



G-EOHG-E KAfT 





A Paramount Picture with 

carole lombard 
sally'rand 

originator of the fan 
dance doing her own 
sensational creation 




AMERICA 



MARCH 3rd 



Mch.3rd, 



v= 



From the psychological clinic of 
the University of Hawaii comes the 
startling statement that 25 out of 
every 100 students will cheat if the 
chance of escaping detection is 
good. i 



Subscribe NOW for The 



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Daily and Sunday 
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Combination 
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Friday, March 2, 1934 



THE TIGER 



\ 



Keyhole Keeper 

Thingumbobs: Marjorie Avalon's 
frizzy little haircut . . . Bernice 
Faught's rather sadly beautiful 
i brown eyes . . . Betas Henry Fin- 
ger, Davey Waters, and Carl May- 
- nard provided the strictly female 
Colonial Ball's only moment of in- 
! terest when they appeared im- 
promptu in 18th century ladies* 
costumes — powder-wigged, hoop- 
skirted, mascarad, etc. Of couse 
Iwhen their identity was discovered, 
gals dressed as boys immediately 
made a rush to dance with a few 
legitimate males. Deans Fauteaux 
etc., looked on smiling benignly. 
Maynard was scared to death. An 
incidental trip of exploration up to 
hitherto forbidden second floor 
realms was also enjoyed by t h e 
"gals". ... no doubt the Betas 
impersonated Ies femmes to perfec- 
tion . . . GB Blackman going into 
the Antlers a couple weeks ago 
to lunch with one strange Mr. Wag- 
ner . . . fun, GB? . . . hometown 
childhood sweetheart Ted Knecht 
is now chiseled out of first place 
with the petite Helen Miller by fra- 
iernity-brother-to-be, Phil Reilly 
. . . McMurtry introducing Lloyd 
Shaw in chapel: "Mr. Shaw, grad- 
uate in the class of 1938" .... 
Shaw's dramatic gesture in throw- 
ing off his academic robe, like 
everything else he does, seemed a 
bit overdoing his carefully calcu- 
lated theatricality ... the Gamma 
Phis have snatched off titian and 
kinky-haired, brown-eyed Ruth 
Martin, who until now we always 
thought was a nice girl . . . can't 
wait until all these fraternity initi- 
ations are over so I can note the 
gullible gals taking the proud but 
rash freshmen's pins . . . during 
hell week, if it wasn't before, I 
imagine the average pledge's atti- 
tude toward the various actives 
must be one of quite active dislike, 
if not one of actual hatred .... 
Gamma Phi pledges have been 
counting the campus's trees as a 
Jtrenuous hell-week . . . rumored 
that two DG pledges have or had 
to leave school on account of 
grades . . . this week's version of 
the Marion Marriott-Beta affair: 
The gal has Paddock's pin again 
but some suspect it to be Carl May- 
nard's Wooglin octagon as there 
is great confusion on all sides . . . 
Paddock goes out with Ellen Per- 
ry, Marriott with various gents, and 
Maynard with Perry. Smoking one 
of the cigars he had distributed 
that evening, Paddock came into 
Bemis Monday night in a trium- 
phal glow only to find friend Mar- 
riott out with somebody else . . . 
Casper, Wyoming — always sound- 
ing like one of the world's bleak- 
est places — is the hometown of the 
gal Jay Shroyer is quite certain to 
have married a couple of weeks 
ago . . . dashing Henry Finger must 



have felt right at home at the 
high school kid party he went to 
out at the Broadmoor .... that 
boy must just love to dress up! 
. . . Marguerite Ridge, upon being 
told that those animals at Tom 
Patterson's Sedalia ranch were 
heifers: "Why, they look just like 
little cows!" . . . Bemis has high- 
totaled three serenades in the past 
week — Phi Gam, Beta, Kappa S i g 
. . . and a scallion to Bemis Hall's 
stool pigeons! . . . starting next 
Tuesday night the real grudge bat- 
tle between Sigma Chis and P h i 
Gams comes off for the local bas- 
ketball title . . . the series should 
really be something. 

NOTICE 

Jo Irish, head coach of the cin- 
der path has issused a call for 
track men to report to him for 
training which will start next 
Wednesday. Prospective men are 
asked to report for equipment be- 
fore Wednesday. A schedule will 
be printed in the next issue of the 
TIGER. 



GOOD PLUMBING AND 
HEATING 

Get an estimate on your 
next job 

J. CSt. John 

PLUMBING & HEATING 
COMPANY 

226 N. Tejon M. 48 



SHEFF & SON 

SUPERIOR FORD SERVICE 
827 N. Tejon M. 1317 



THE EMERY STUDIO 

Fine Portraiture 

Official Nugget Studio 

Plaza Hotel Building 



"WHEN A FELLER 
NEEDS A FRIEND" 





When a collapsible collar makes you look 
pretty silly. . .forget it, son, with a pipe- 
ful of BRIGGS. This tranquil tobacco 
brings peace after panic. Long seasoned in 
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to mildness. There's not a bite in a barrel- 
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A BETTER POSITION 



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earn two hundred dollars or more this summer. SO CAN YOU. 
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salary for next year. YOU CAN BE ONE OF THEM. Com- 
plete information and helpful suggestions will be mailed on re- 
ceipt of a three cent stamp. Good positions are available now in 
every state. They will soon be filled. (Teachers address Dept. T. 
All others address Dept. S.) 

CONTINENTAL TEACHERS AGENCY, Inc. 

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You may wire us 
your vacancies at 
our expense, i f 
speed is urgent. 
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complete, free 
confidential re- 
ports by air mail 
within 36 hours. 



THE TIGER 



Friday, March 2, 1934 








You hear a lot today about balanced diet— 

. . and there's something too in the way tobaccos 
are balanced that makes a cigarette milder and 
makes it taste better. 

I keep coming back to that statement on the 
back of the Chesterfield package — 

Chesterfield- 
•••(Tgarettes 



ARE A BALANCED BLEND 
OF THE FINEST AROMATIC 
TURKISH TOBACCO AND 
THE CHOICEST OF SEVERAL 
AMERICAN VARIETIES 
BLENDED IN THE CORRECT 
PROPORTION TO BRING 
OUT THE FINER QUALITIES 
OF EACH TOBACCO. 

REG. U. S. PAT. OFF. 



We believe you'll enjoy Chesterfields and we 
ask you to try them. 



© 1934. 

I.K.f.i it & Myers 

Tobacco Co. 



esterfi 




the cigarette that's MILDER • the cigarette that TASTES BETTER 



JpOI>L>EGEs> 

^ "INN" 

ACROSS FROM MURRAY'S 



Strachans 

SWEET SHOP 
Bijou and Nevada 



IRA C. DUGAN 

Jeweler and Optometriat 

Fine Watch and Clock Repairing 

Eyes Examined — Glasses Fitted 

— Lenses Duplicated — 

Phone Main 1702-J 9 N. Tejon SI 



The best way to tell of the 
beauty of Colorado, Stand- 
ley's Color Pictures, Hand- 
Colored — 35 cents up. 

H.L.Standley 

PHOTOGRAPHER 

224 No. Tejon St 

Colorado Springs 



*— 



Antlers Hotel 

/ Dinner Dances 

Saturdays, starting 7 p. m., $1.50 
a plate. After 9, cover charge 
charge 75c for those not having 
dinner. 



Firesfone 

ONE STOP 
SERVICE 



Let Us 

Prepare Your Car 

for Winter Driving 






Complete Lubrication 

Motor Oils 

Batteries and Repairing 

Firestone Anti-freeze 

Prestone and Alcohol 



Brake Relining and Adjusting 

Texaco "Fire Chief" Gasoline 

"Red Head" Car Heaters 

/Wa^^t 



115-121 N. Nevada 
Phone M. 202 



+ 



./ 



Couture's 

FRENCH CLEANING & 

We Solicit Your Patronage 
DYEING CO. 



218 N. Tejon St. 

Colorado Springa, Colo. 

Phone Main 1288 



ParticularWork 

FOR PARTICULAR PERSONS 
AT NO HIGHER COST 

Smith Bros. 

CLEANERS, DYERS, HATTERS 
13-15 E. Kiowa Phones 1221-1222 



I 





C/ie 
Old Maestro 



See page one 




Cadies and 
Qcntlcmcn 




Issued each week during the academic year. Entered at the 'ost Office at Colorado Spring* aa Second-Claaa Matter. 



THE TIGER 







Reward's 

(^Barber 
P Shop 

19 East Bijou Street 



Pack Bags 
Laundry Bags 
Hikers Supplies 

THE OUTWEST 
TENT and AWNING CO 



M. 1261 



18 E. Kiowa 



To Maintain 
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the pipe tobacco that's MILD 
the pipe tobacco that's COOL 

The method of preparing Granger 
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So far as we know, it is taking out of tobaccos the 
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or taste right in a pipe. 

Granger owes its extra 
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The way Granger Tobac- 
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PHOTOGRAPHS 

The Gift that only you can give 
Official Photographer, C. C. Nugget 

PAYTON STUDIO 

30 S. Tejon Phone M. 477-J 



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Price is uniform 

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H. A. Thompson 



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Call Main 939, Rear 15 E. Bijou 



I VOLUME XXXVI 



THE TIGER 



COLORADO COLLEGE WEEKLY NEWS-MAGAZINE 



Number 23 



♦ e A M P u 



Ben Bernie 

the old Blue Ribbon bandmaster 
with his boys bring a musical treat 
Ito dance lovers of the region in a 
lone night show at the Broadmoor 
hotel tomorrow evening. Colorado 
[Springs will be honored as the only 
listop in the mid-west for the Maes- 
Itro and his nationally famous dance 
(band. 

Behind the gala exterior of such 
la festive occasion lies the story of 
a unique friendship between Bob 
Rhea, well-known business man of 
Colorado Springs and Bernie. Sat- 
urday will be the first meeting be- 
tween the two even though their 
friendship has endured for years by 
correspondence. It is at Rhea's re- 
quest that Bernie and his band are 
making the stopover and it is Ber- 
nie's insistence that neither he nor 
his music makers will receive a cent 
for the performance. As Mr. Charles 
Tutt has donated the use of the 
Broadmoor hotel ballroom for the 
occasion, the entire proceeds will be 
given to Sunny Rest Sanatorium 
and to the nutrition camp. 

Preceding the dance the Broad- 
moor dining room will be the scene 
of a group of dinner parties adding 
color to the affair. 

The entire ballroom will be 
brought into use for the dancers 
as will an extensive speaker system. 
Tickets may be had at Murray's 
Drug store for $1.50 per person. 

Enthusiastic 

members of the International 
Relations Club met at Mr. Bram- 
hall's home last Sunday evening 
kfor an informal debate on the sub- 
ject: "Resolved: That Austria 
Wiould be Allowed to Join Ger- 
many". The affirmative side of the 
question was ably handled by 
Genevieve Affolter, Alfred Hein- 
icke, and George Markley. The 
negative side, which won the ap- 
proval of the class, was represent- 
ed by Helen Goodsell, Joe Boothe, 
and Gilbert Baylis. 

Miss Amy Hemmingway Jones, 
division assistant of the division of 
intercourse and education of the 
Carnegie endowment for interna- 
tional peace, will address the club 
at their special meeting, Sunday, 
March 11. 



Invitations 

have been issued to the teas giv- 
en by Dr. and Mrs. C. B. Hershey 
for the members of the three ad- 
vanced schools of COLORADO 
COLLEGE. 

The first tea of this series was 
held last Sunday, March 4, for the 
students and faculty of the School 
of Letters and Fine Arts. As Chair- 
man of this school, Prof. Albert H. 
Daehler and his wife stood in the 
receiving line with Dr. and Mrs. 
Hershey. 

The second tea will be held on 
Sunday, March 11, for the mem- 
bers of the Natural Science School. 
At this time, Prof. Charles H. Sis- 
am, Prof, and Mrs. Paul E. Bouch- 
er will assist Dr. and Mrs. Hershey. 

The last tea in the series will be 
held on March 18, for the students 
and faculty members of the Social 
Science School. Prof, and Mrs. 
Carroll Malone will assist Dr. and 
Mrs. Hershey at that time. 

Car Loadings 

and the intricate workings of the 
nation's transportation system will 
be discussed by Prof. David W. 
Crabb in his public lecture Tuesday 
in Perkins hall. 

The subject of the lecture will 
be "The Transportation Problem 
and Some Suggestions for its So- 
lution" and will begin at eight 
o'clock. Professor Crabb graduated 
from COLORADO COLLEGE in 
1920, passed his examination in 
Illinois as a Certified Public Ac- 
countant in 1922 and received the 
M. S. degree in accounting from 
the University of Illinois in 1923. 
He came here as Professor of Busi- 
ness Administration in 1931. 



Research 

Georgia Pickett, a graduate stu- 
dent, has recently completed six 
months work on a social research 
project directed by Alice van Diest, 
the survey of housing conditions in 
Colorado Springs. Social workers 
and others interested in relief work 
here have felt the need for material 
on the rent situation. Miss Pickett 
has studied and reported on two of 
their important problems; the rela- 
tionship between the assessed valu- 
ation of a property and the rent 
charged for it, and the lack of uni- 
formity of rents in various Colorado 
Springs neighborhoods. 

Miss Pickett visited seven hun- 
dred homes listed by the Associated 
Charities and the F. R. E. A., and 
says that she was kindly received 
by everyone except the traditionally 
difficult landladies. Her chief prob- 
lem was tracing families who mov- 
ed frequently. 

The assessed valuation of a prop- 
erty is based on the lot value, con- 
veniences, its condition, the size of 
the house, and its location. Miss 
Pickett's reports will be used by 
real estate offices and charities. 



Inkas and Ink 

A very interesting meeting was 
held at Cossitt Commons of the Inka 
Literary Club, on Thursday, March 
the first. Louie Marie Mason read a 
story concerning a shoe-salesman, 
who, being discouraged with the 
ways of this world, has committed 
suicide and goes to tell his troubles 
to Saint Peter. 

Ruth Crawford turned the trend 
of the meeting from prose to poet- 
ry by reading some poems which 
she had composed while hiking 
among the mountains. 

Then followed a delightful infor- 
mal discussion. The name Inkas 
was adopted, and it was decided 
the meetings would be held on the 
second and fourth Thursdays of 
each month. 

All people who are at all inter- 
ested in literature and creative writ- 
ing are urged to attend the meet- 
ings which are held in Cossitt Com- 
mons. 



All applications for Editor and 
Manager of the TIGER and Student 
Handbook must be in the hands of 
Mr. Jack Lawson not later than 
Wednesday March 14. 



Paige Ranch 

was the scene of a Euterpe din- 
ner at their last meeting. After the 
dinner the society was entertained 
by a musical program. 

An Irish program will be offered 
to the club next Tuesday in the 
Art Gallery of Perkins hall. The 
program follows: 

Voice; Smiling Through and 
Mother Machree by Jean Crawford 
accompanied by Ruth Crawford. 

Dance; Rubinstein Romance by 
the Suttle twins. 

Voice; A Little Bit of Heaven 
by Evert Boerrigter. 

Violin; The Last Rose of Sum- 
mer and Londonnarry Air by Mary 
Mansfield accompanied by Ruth 
Crawford. 



"Overland to the Pacific" Series to 
be Completed 

"The Oregon Crusade", "Life 
and Correspondence of Marcus 
Whitman" in two volumes and "The 
Oregon Migration of 1843-5" are 
the unpublished books compiled by 
the late Professor Hulbert of COL- 
ORADO COLLEGE which Mrs. 
Hulbert will edit and prepare for 
publication. The books were left 
with much editorial work, instruc- 
tions, footnotes and correlation of 
material complete so that they will 
appear largely as Professor Hulbert 
would have written them. 

Mrs. Hulbert, formerly on the 
COLORADO COLLEGE faculty 
and a member of Gamma Phi Beta 
is eminently suited to carry out Pro- 
fessor Hulbert's plans through her 
close cooperation in gathering ma- 
terial for "The Forty-Niner's", Dr. 
Hulbert's Atlantic Monthly prize 
ing at Oberlin, Radcliffe, Columbia, 
and Chicago. On her trip abroad in 

1930 she gathered much of the ma- 
terial for "The Forty-Niner's, Dr. 
Hulber's Atlantic Monthly prize 
winner. Her work is being sponsor- 
ed by the Stuart Commission on 
Western History and the Denver 

Public Library. 



Upholding 

in debative combat the honor of 
COLORADO COLLEGE, Genevieve 
Affolter and Alfred Heinicke will 
debate a team from the University 
of Southern California Tuesday, 
March 13 in Room 48, Palmer hall. 

The local debaters will argue the 
negative of the question: "Re- 
solved that the Powers of the Presi- 
dent of the United States Should 
be Permanently increased as a Set- 
tled Policy". There will be no 
charge for the debate. 

It will be a decision affair with 
Mayor George Birdsall, Judge Jchn 
Young, and Hobart Corning, super- 
intendent of schools, serving as 
judges. 



CHAPEL CALENDAR 

Tuesday, March 13, 10:00 A.M.— 

Chapel Service. Speaker: Rev. 
Wallace H. Carver, D. D. Sub- 
ject: "The Way Out for Ameri- 

if 
ca. 

Thursday, March 16, 5:00 P. M.— 

The third in the fifth group of 
The Five o'Clock Series of Ad- 
dresses by Dean McMurtry. on 
"The Man Christ Jesus". This 
address on "His Personality." 
Thursday, March 16, 8:15 P. M.— 
Concert by the Colorado Springs 
Symphony Orchestra under the 
direction of Dr. Frederick Booth- 
royd. 

The public is cordially invited to 
these programs. 



THE TIGER 



Friday, March 9, 1934 



THE TIGER 




Editor 



LEW CROSBY 



Business Manager E. F. STAPLETON 

EDITORIAL STAFF 

Editors: Managing Editor, Bob Johnson; Campus Editor. Joseph Lowe; 
Sports Editors, Harold Marlowe, John Bicknell ; Society Editor, Alice Her- 
som ; Makeup Editor, Martin Legere ; Pictorial Editor, David Dentan ; Ex- 
change Editor, John Dickey ; News Editors, Miller Stroup, Edith Weaver, 
Peg Swan, Albert Stubblefield, Fritz Baker ; A. W. S„ Ernestine Stroup ; 
W. A. A., Louie Marie Mason. 

Society staff — Luzilla Eubank, Mildred Fritchle, Muriel McClanahan, 
Sarah Mclntyre, Caroline Morrison, Lyda Roark, Sally Tompkins, Jane 
Walker. Imogens Young. Makeup staff — Edith Gaylord. Exchange staff — 
Charles Macdonald. Sports staff — Ronald Rolph. James Ransom, Dick Al- 
son, David Waters. Proof readers — Lucy Blackman, Frances Stevenson. 
News staff — Jake Johnson, David Dentan, Gilbert Baylis. Alice Sutton, La- 
Rue Wiley. Nanet Meredith, Claire Sweany, Elvira Cortellini, Ruth Mary 
Webster. Esther Alexander, Charles Dewing, Ken Hall, Jennie Conway, 
Mark Schreiber, Marybel Poer, Ruth Liverman, Margaret Stewart, Ann 
Daniels, Conrad Brown, Dale Ashbaugh, Frank Johnson. Jean James, Doro- 
thy Elston, Helen Miller, Ellen Perry, Susan Braerton, Dick Hall, Emma 
Louise Jordan, Virginia Botsford, Roberta McKay. 

MANAGER'S STAFF 
Tom Patterson — Assistant Business Manager. Staff: Dave Waters, Ken 
Markel, Dave Baker, Otis Elliot. A. J. Cronk. Circulation Manager — Bob 
Kelley. 



♦ Wrong 

We made a statement in a past edition that "one man could not 
put over a constructive proposition by himself." Jack Kintz is well on 
the way towards proving us wrong. Almost singlehanded, he has pushed 
the idea of a COLORADO COLLEGE glee club until it has almost start- 
ed rolling of its own momentum. This is the kind of enthusiasm that 
means something. This is the kind of effort which may, in the future, 
convince those who have the power, that the ONLY way to insure the 
success of such a venture is the allotment of semester credit for those 
who give their time to it. The fall semester should see, among other 
surprising changes, credit given to those who participate in the band 
and in glee club. 



+ A Bouquet 

to Robetr Rhea, Charles L. Tutt and Ben Bernie for the spirit 
which makes it possible to sponsor such an entertainment as that of to- 
morrow evening and for such a worthy cause. May some of us learn 
a much-needed lesson from this example in the realization that, after 
all, there are successful men who still believe that "it is better to give 
than to receive." 



KVOR RADIO PROGRAM 

Every effort is made to insure the ac- 
curacy of our programs at the time of 
going to press; hosvever, there is the pos- 
sibility of late changes so we advise list- 
ening to the "KVOR PROGRAM NEWS" 
broadcast daily at 11:00 A. M.— 4 :30 P. M. 
— and 10:00 P. M. 

SUNDAY, MARCH 11, 1934 
A. M. 
"10:00 Salt Lake Tabernacle Choir 
10:30 Judge Rutherford 
10:80 Madison Ensemble 
1 1 :00 Grace Church Services 
P.M. 
12:00 Luncheonaires 
12:45 "Where They Come To Get Well" 

• 1 :00 New York Phil.-Symph. Orchestra 
3:00 KVOR PROGRA MNEWS 

:! :06 Antennagrams 

• 3:15 Grunow Varieties 
3.30 Calvary Melodies 
4:00 Sunday Matinee 

• 4 :45 Twilight Musicale from KMOX 

• 5:00 Vesper Hour 

• 5:15 Welch Madrigal Choir 

• 5:30 Clarence Wheeler's Orchestra 
' 5:46 Organ-Harp Recital 

6 :00 Service 

• 6:15 Timely Tempos 

>. :80 Fred Waring's Pennsylvanians 

7:00 Songs at Twilight, with F. Shantz 

7:15 Memory Melodies 

7:30 Dancing Melodies with B. Gordon 

7:45 The Westerners 

8 :00 Garden of Melody 

8:15 Dnnce Time 

• 8:30 Earnest Hutchison, pianist 

• 8:00 H. V. Knltenhorn 

• 9:15 Little Jack Little's Orchestra 

• 9:45 Ace Blgode's Orchl 
10:00 KVOR PROGRAM NEWS 

MONDAY, MARCH 12. 1931 
A.M. 

• 8:00 Metropolitan Pnrade 

8:15 "Where They Come To Get Well" 
■ Columbia News Servir,. 

• 8:15 The Merrymakers 
B:46 Homemakers Hour 

• 9:16 Morning Moods 



* 9:45 Peggy Keenan and Sandra Phillips 
10:00 Gordon Roberts Organ Melodies 

* 1 : 1 5 Elizabeth Barthell 

♦10:30 Emery Deutsch and Orchestra 
11:00 KVOR PROGRAM NEWS 

*11:15 George Hall and Orchestra 

♦11:80 Mischa Raginsky Edison Ensemble 
P.M. 

12:00 Luncheonaires 
12:15 Friendly Hour 

♦12:30 American School of the Air 

* 1 :00 Oahu Serenaders 

* 1:15 The Voice of Experience 

* 1:30 U. S. Navy Band 

* 2:00 Bob Nolan and his Orchestra 

* 2:15 Library of Cong. Cham. Musicale 

* 3:00 Between the Bookends 

* 3:15 The Dictators 

* 3:30 Teddy Hayes Orchestra 

* 3:45 Maurice Sherman's Orchestra 
4 :00 Monday Matinee 

* 4:15 Gene and Charlie 

4:30 KVOR PROGRAM NEWS 
4:35 Tea Time Musicale 

* 4:15 Sam Robbins' Orchestra 
5:00 Cecil and Sally 

* 5:15 The Texas Rangers 

* 5:30 Shipmate Quartet 

5:45 The Three Boy Friends 
6:00 Service 

* 6:15 Si and Elmer 

6 :45 Law Male Quartet 
7 :00 Musical Revelries 

* 7:15 Fray and Braggiotti 
7:30 Riders of the Rio Grande 

8:00 For-Get-Me-Not 

K:ir> Popular Melodies 

s ;80 Presenting Mark Warnow 

8:45 Buck Home Hour 

* 9:00 Freddie Rich and Orchestra 

* 9 :20 Columbia News Service 

* 9:15 Charlie Davis and Orchestra 

* 9:45 Dirk Messiwr's Orchestra 
10:00 KVOR PROGRAM NEWS 

TUESDAY. MARCH 13, 1934 
A.M. 
8:(iii Hill and Ginger 

* 8:15 Current Questions from Congress 
*:::n Colombia News Service 

8:35 Morning Moods 

* 8:45 The Frivolities 

• :i>" (..-..i n.ialtfa Hour 
9:15 Homemaker's Hour 



* 9:45 Larry Tate and Orchestra 

10 :00 Gordon Roberts Organ Melodies 
♦10:15 Connie Gates 
♦10:30 George Scherban and Orchestra 

11:00 KVOR PROGRAM NEWS 

11 :05 Morning Musicale 
•11:45 Louis Panico's Orchestra 
P.M. 

12:00 Luncheonaires 
♦12:30 American School of the Air 
5 1 :00 Metropolitan Parade 

* 1 :30 Gypsy Music Makers 
2 :00 Airevusicale 

* 2:30 Enoch Light's Orchestra 

* 3 :00 Between the Bookends 

* 3:15 Madison Ensemble 

s 3:30 Eddie Copeland's Orchestra 

* 3:45 Maurice Sherman's Orchestra 
4 :00 Tuesday Matinee 

* 4:15 Bob Nolan and Norm Sheir 
4:30 KVOR PROGRAM NEWS 
4:35 Tea Time Musicale 

« 4 :45 Al and Pete 
5:00 Cecil and Sally 

* 5:15 The Texas Rangers 

5 :30 Protective Diet League 
5:45 Musical Popourri 
6 :00 Around the Town 

* 6:15 Husk O'Hare's Orchestra 
6:30 Visual Health 

* 6:45 California Melodies 

7:00 Around the Town Again 
7:15 For-Get-Me-Not 
7:30 Dance Time 
8:00 Popular Revue 
8:15 The Westerners 

* 8 :30 Harlem Serenade 
8 :45 Back Home Hour 

* 9:00 Charles Carlile 

* 9:15 Columbia News Service 

* 9:20 Ozzie Nelson and his Orchestra 
9 :45 Melody Revue 

10:00 KVOR PROGRAM NEWS 

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 14, 1934 

A. M. 

* 8 :00 In the Luxembourg Gardena. 
8:15 Where They Come To Get Well 

* 8 :30 Columbia News Service 

* 8 :35 Emery Deutsch and his Orchestra 
8:45 Homemaker's Hour 

* 9:15 Four Showmen 

* 9:30 Tony Wons 
9:45 Antennagrams 

10 :00 Gordon Roberts Organ Melodies 
"10:15 Elizabeth Barthell 

10:30 Airevusicale 
♦10:45 Mischa Raginskv Edison Ensemble 

11:00 KVOR PROGRAM NEWS 

11:05 Morning Musicale 
♦11:45 The Playboys 
P.M. 

12:00 Luncheonaires 

12:15 Friendly Hour 
►12:30 American School of the Air 
- i :00 LaForge-Berumen Musicale 
1:30 The Pickard Family 

* 2:00 Musical Album 

* 2 :30 Educational Feature 

* 2 :45 The Merrymakers 

* 3:00 Between the Bookends 

* 3:45 Maurice Sherman's Orchestra 
4:00 Wednesday Matinee 

* 4:15 Gene and Charlie 
4 :30 Cecil and Sallv 

* 4:45 Tito Guizar 

•5 :00 Nyal Ucatone Program 

* 5:15 The Texas Rangers 

5:30 Judge Rutherford. "The Church" 

* 5:45 Three of Us With Diane 
6:00 Service 

* 6:15 Husk O'Hare and Orchestra 
6:80 Si and Elmer 

6 :45 Around the Town 
7 :00 Musical Revelries 

* 7:15 Alexander Woolcott. Town Crier 
7:30 Riders of the Rio Grande 

* 8:00 Andre Kostelanetz Presents 
8:45 Back Home Hour 

* 9:00 Five Spirits of Rhythm 

* 9:15 Columbia News Service 

* 9:20 Little Jack Little's Orchestra 

* 9:45 Dick Messner's Orchestra 
10:00 KVOR PROGRAM NEWS 

THURSDAY, MARCH 15. 1934 
A.M. 

* 8:00 Bill and Ginger 

* 8:45 Ida Bailey Allen 
8:30 Breakfast Club 
9:00 Good Health Hour 
9:15 Homemaker's Hour 

* 9:45 Academy of Medicine Program 
10:00 Gordon Roberts Organ Melodies 

♦10:15 Connie Gates 

♦10:30 George Scherban and Orchestra 
11:00 KVOR PROGRAM NEWS 
1 1 :06 Morning Musicale 
*11:45 The Caplivators 
P. M. 

12:00 Luncheonaires 
♦12:30 American School of the Air 
1.00 Metropolitan Panda 
1:80 National Federation Program 

* 1 :45 Curtis Institute of Music 

* 2:30 Bob Standish 

* 2:45 Artist Recital 

* 3:00 Between the Bookends 

* 3:15 George Hall's Orchestra 

* 3:30 Eddie Copeland's Orchestra 

* 3:45 Clarence Wheeler's Orchestra 
4:00 Thursday Matinee 

* 4:15 Bob Nolan and Norm Sherr 
4:30 KVOR PROGRAM NEWS 

4:36 Tea Time Musicale 



* 4:45 Al and Pete 
5:00 Cecil and Sally 

• 5:15 The Texas Rangers 

5 :30 Protective Diet League 

5 :45 Musical Popourri 

♦ 6:00 Freddie Rich Entertains 
6:30 Visual Health 

• 6 :45 Clarence Wheeler's Orchestra 
7:00 Beauty That Endures 

♦ 7:15 Emery Deutsch and Orchestra 

♦ 7 :30 Fred Waring's Pennsylvanians 
8:00 Paramount Movie Parade 
8:15 Popular Melodies 

* 8 :30 Evan Evans and Concert Orchestra 
8 :45 Back Home Hour 

♦ 9:00 Vera Van 

* 9:15 Columbia News Service 

* 9 :20 Isham Jones and his Orchestra 

* 9 :45 Harry Sosnick and his Orchestra 
10:00 KVOR PROGRAM NEWS 

FRIDAY. MARCH 16, 1934 
A.M. 

* 8 :00 Madison Singers 

8:15 Where They Come To Get Well 

* 8 :30 Columbia News Service 

* 8:35 Round Towners 

* 8 :45 Homemaker's Hour 

* 9:15 The Captivators 

* 9:30 Tony Wons 

* 9:45 Dancing Echoes 

10:00 Gordon Roberts Organ Melodies 
•10:16 Elizabeth Barthell 

10:30 Antennagrams 
♦10:45 George Hall and Orchestra 

11 :00 KVOR PROGRAM NEWS 

11 :00 Morning Musicale 
•11:15 The Hurdy-Gurdy Man 

11 :30 Airevusicale 
♦11 :45 The Plavboys 
P. M. 

12:00 Luncheonaires 

12:15 Friendly Hour 
♦12:30 Philadelphia Orch, Leopold Pro-I 
♦12:30 Phila. Orch.. Leopold Stokowski 

• 2:00 Artist Recital 

♦ 2:30 U. S. Army Band 

♦ 3:00 Between the Bookends 

♦ 3:15 Dick Messner's Orchestra 

* 3:30 Teddy Hayes and Orchestra 

* 3:45 Maurice Sherman's Orchestra 
4:00 Friday Matinee 

* 4:15 Gene and Charlie 

4:30 KVOR PROGRAM NEWS 

♦ 4:35 What's On The Air 

* 4 :45 Dorothy Miller and Organ 
5:00 Cecil and Sallv 

* 5:15 The Texas Rangers 

• 5:30 Clarence Wheeler's Orchestra 
5:45 The Three Boy Friends 

6 :00 Service 

* 6:15 Husk O'Hare's Orchestra 
6:30 Si and Elmer 

6:45 Around the Town 

7 :00 Musical Revelries 
7:15 For-Get-Me-Nots 

7:30 Riders of the Rio Grande 

8 :00 Popular Revue 
8:15 Accordian Airs 

♦ 8 :30 Mary Eastman with Concert Orch. 
8:45 Back Home Hour 

♦ 9:00 Charles Carlile 

♦ 9:15 Columbia News Service 

♦ 9:20 Isham Jones and his Orchestra 

• 9:45 Enoch Light's Orchestra 
10:00 KVOR PROGRAM NEWS 

SATURDAY. MARCH 17. 1934 
A.M. 

♦ 8:00 Paul Mason and Orchestra 

♦ 8:30 Columbia News Service 

♦ 8:35 Adventures of Helen and Mary 
9:00 Good Health Hour 

9:15 Cheer-Up 

♦ 9 :30 Concert Miniatures 

10 :00 Gordon Roberts Organ Melodies 
♦10:15 Vincent Travers and Orchestra 
♦10:30 Abram Chasin's Piano Pointers 
♦10:45 Enoch Light's Orchestra 
♦11:00 Eamon De Valera's "St. Patrick's 
Day's Message" 
11:16 KVOR PROGRAM NEWS 
♦11:20 Savitt String Quartet 
♦11 :30 Harold Knight and Orchestra 

P. M. 
♦12:00 The Band of Erin 
♦12:30 Dancing Echoes 

1 :00 Harvard-U. of Chicago Debate 

♦ :00 Mrs. F. D. Roosevelt. National Busi- 

ness Women's Week Talk 

* 2:15 Earnest Hutcheson 

♦ 2:30 Mischa Raginsky Edison Ensemble 

♦ 2 :45 Syracuse Liederkanrz Chorus 

♦ 3 :00 Pancho and his Orchestra 
3:30 KVOR PROGRAM NEWS 

♦ 3:35 Maurice Sherman's Orchestra 

• 3:45 Dell Campo 

♦ 4 :00 Meet the Artist 

♦ 4:15 Real Life Dramas 
4 :30 Judge Rutherford 

♦ 4:45 George Scherban and Orchestra 

♦ 5:00 Elder Michaux and his Con. 
5:30 Protective Diet League 
5:45 Musical Popourri 

6:00 Around the Town 

6:30 Melodies In The Modern Manner 

• 7:15 Alexander Goolcott, Town Criier 

* 7 :30 George Jessol 

8:00 Riders of the Rio Grande 

♦ 8:30 Columbian Mile 

♦ 8:45 Guy Lombnrdo and his Orchestra 
♦9:15 Columbia News Service 

• 9:20 Ann Leaf with Brad Reynolds 
B BO Catherine the Great 

10:00 KVOR PROGRAM NEWS 
•Columbia Broadcasting System, Inc. 



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Copyright, 19.14. The 
American Tobacco Company 



From the Diamond Horse-Shoe of the 
Metropolitan Obera House.- 

Saturday at 1:50 P. M.. Eastern Stand- 
ard Time, over Red and Blue-. Net- 
works of NBC, LUCKY STRIKE will 
broadcast the Metropolitan Opera Com- 
pany of New York in the complete 
Operas, "Pagliacci" and "Salome". 



THE JOY OF GOOD TASTE 



And good taste is one great pleasure 
you find in every Lucky Strike, for 
only the finest Turkish and Domestic 
tobaccos are used in Lucky Strike . . . 



and only the center leaves. They are the 
mildest leaves, the most tender. Every 
Lucky Strike is fully packed . . . always 
so round, so firm — no loose ends. 



Always the Finest Tobacco 



NO 1 the top leaves — they're under- 
developed— they ore harsh I 



and only the Center Leaves 



The Cream of the Crop 

"The mildest, smoothest tobacco" 



ZL 



NOT the bottom leaves — they're inferior 
in quality — coarse and always san.lv '. 



THE TIGER 



Friday, March 9, 1934 



Junior Prom 

A ten inch loving cup for t h e 
winning couple of the dancing con- 
test . . . the beauty parade of 
nominees for the 1934 Nugget 
Beauty Queen ... a featured 
floor show . . . the coronation 
of the 1934 prom queen .... 
Johnny Metzler's orchestra, all 
combine and lend themselves to 
making this year's Junior Prom the 
most pretentious and gala affair of 
its kind ever before presented bv 
any junior class of COLORADO 
COLLEGE. The place ... The 
Broadmoor, the date . . . Friday, 
March 16. 

The fashion parade, an especial 
feature, will be an attraction of in- 
terest to everyone as it is the usual 
beauty march combined with a 
spring style show presenting t h e 
latest creations from style centers 
with the twelve Nugget beauty 
nominees in the role of manne- 
quins. 

An extraordinary feature also 
presented for the first time this 
year is the phenominally low price, 
establishing a new low for such an 
affair. 



A Lonely Tavern 

on a stormy night with the rum- 
ble and flash of thunder and light- 
ning. A perfect setting for mystery 
and melodrama. And what a sur- 
prise is due for the audience at the 
Koshare of COLORADO COL- 
LEGE production of "The Tavern" 
to be given Wednesday and Thurs- 
day nishts, March 21 and 22 in 
Cosrswell theatre. 

The show has all of the ele- 
ments which combine to make a 
Broadwav production. The fact 
it was written by George Cohan and 
successfully played for over a year 
on Broadwav should alone be worth 
the price of admission. 

The cast of "The Tavern" will 
be announced in next week's edi- 
tion of THE TIGER. 



1917 — Ain't you the berries! 

1919 — Yes, we have no banan- 
as. 

1920 — Good night nurse! 

1921 — Jiminy whiskers! 

1922 — Aw, go peddle your pap- 
ers. 

1923 — So's your Aunt Emma. 

1924 — Some baby. 

1925 — So's your old man. 

1926 — So I took the fifty thou- 
sand. 

1927 — Is zat so? Applesauce! 

1928 — I faw down and go boom. 

1929— And how! 

1930— Oh yeah? 

1931 — Ain't that somethin'? 

1932— How'm I doin? 

1933 — Come up 'n see some 
time. — Any time. 

1934 }■)■)} 

— The Gusher. 



Miss E'izabeth Anderson, Delta 
Gamma pledge, left for her home 

j in Los Angeles, Calif, on Thurs. 
Feb. 15, where she will recuperate 
from the affects of a fractured an- 
kle. She expects to return to 

! COLORADO COLLEGE next se- 
mester. 



THRILLED 
Fashions of 1934 
Warner's 

It is psychologically impossible 
for any sane coed to have disliked 
the Fashions of 1934. Such 
clothes — Filmy negligees, glitter- 
ing evening gowns, tea gowns that 
make you weep, and sport clothes 
that you'd give half your life to 
own. (And they wonder why girls 
swarm into Hollywood by the 
thousands every year). 

But there was no reason why the 
men should have been excluded. 
This picture hit a new high in 
nakedness. A hundred chorus girls 
dressed in two wisps (and I mean 
"wisps") of ostrich feathers apiece 
(paging the Betas). We also ob- 
served that our Colorado cen- 
sors let by several very broad- 
minded remarks (Paging the Fi- 
jis). 

The suave William Powell was 
not at his best in this picture, but 
who noticed? 



Speaking 

on "The Geologic History of the 
Pikes Peak Region", Prof. H. E. 
Mathias gave an illustrated lecture 
before the Kiwanis Club March 7th 
at their regular Wednesday lunch 
eon meeting. 



Because of numerous gate crash 
ers at their athletic contests, Uni 
versity of Kentucky of